20

The Gemara in Megilla 6a says Rebbi Yehuda Hanasi went to the bath house on 17 Tammuz. The Shulchan Aruch OC 550:2 rules that bathing is permitted on the 'minor' fasts and is only forbidden on Tisha B'av and Yom Kippur. The Mishna Brura there (sk 6) says that a meticulous person ("baal nefesh") should be stringent on all the 5 afflictions of tisha b'av (...


20

Perhaps they are referring to the idea mentioned here. That is one shouldn't invite anyone to a bris as declining such an invitation would be bad (Rema Yoreh Deah 265:12). But if you don't receive an invitation at all, one can choose not to show up.


16

Pirkei D'Rebbi Eliezer 29 says that Shem Ben Noach performed Avraham's bris. The Medrash Rabba Bereishis 49:2 says that Hashem held Avraham's hand and helped him perform the bris. The verse in Bereishis 17:24 supports that it was performed by someone else, as it uses the passive language בהמולו, when he was circumcised, and Rashi there points out that this ...


15

The Rambam in Mishna Torah Hilchos Milah 1:7 says that someone who has 2 Orlos they make the Bris for both on the 8th day. ומי שיש לו שתי ערלות, מלין את שתיהן בשמיני. The Aruch HaShulchan Yoreh Deah 262:13 and the Sefer Minchas Ani - Hilchos Milah 13 says that although the Bris is done on the 8th day by such a child it would not be done on the 8th day if ...


15

Chizkuni asks this and offers two answers: The reason the Egyptians were circumcised was because of the hunger of the famine. Yosef however was rich and therefore the only reason he would circumcise himself would be if he was Jewish. Although all the Egyptians were in fact circumcised, the brothers were not aware of this this and would recognize Yosef on ...


14

As with all questions of practical halachah, CYLOR (especially since there may be public policy issues involved). However: Responsa Hillel Omer (Yoreh De'ah 144) addresses such a case. He says that the boy is certainly allowed to have an aliyah, considering that it's not his fault that he is uncircumcised; at that age the responsibility still rests on his ...


13

The Shulchan Arukh (YD 268:1) rules (like the Tur, quoting a Gaon; see too Tosfot Yevamot 46b) that a male whose genitals have been removed ("Nikhrat haGid") doesn't need Milah or Hatafat Dam Berit, and can just go to the Mikva directly (like a woman). The Arukh haShulchan there explains this is because there is nothing to circumcise, and the Gra notes that ...


12

According to Talmud (Yevamot 71–72) the reason circumcision was not practiced in the desert is: Because of the hardships of the way - a 40 year journey is no joke. Since is would have been dangerous for someone right after circumcision to get on the road, and they had no choice but to be on the road, they waited until the trek was over. Because there was ...


12

You've already cited the relevant source, but maybe it's worth seeing the Shulchan Arukh (YD 264:1) inside: הכל כשרים למול אפי' עבד אשה וקטן וערל ישראל שמתו אחיו מחמת מילה ואם יש ישראל גדול שיודע למול הוא קודם לכלם (וי"א דאשה לא תמול וכן נוהגין להדר אחר איש).‏ All can circumcise, even a slave or a woman or a child or an uncircumcised Jew. And if ...


11

According to this article, it is from the Medieval German word, Gottvater (godfather).


11

The Mishna Berura says: בימינו נהגו הנשים לומר ג"כ על בריתך שחתמת בבשרנו ועל תורתך שלמדתנו וכו' והכוונה על ברית הזכרים שחתמת בבשרנו וכן תורתך שלמדתנו על למוד הזכרים שבזכות התורה והברית נחלו ישראל את הארץ ועוד שגם הנשים צריכות ללמוד מצות שלהן לידע היאך לעשותן. Loosely translated: "These days the Minhag is that women also say "for the covenant...", and it ...


11

Actually the order for a convert is: first have circumcision, then wait for that to heal, then immerse in the mikvah. The immersion is what finalizes the conversion. The law of "a convert upon conversion is like a newborn" is limited to certain laws, primarily that Torah law regards the convert as no longer related to their prior relatives.


11

after the circumcision, the foreskin is buried (some prepare a dish with dirt in it to "bury" the foreskin immediately). Some bury it in earth that has a new tree planted in it as a symbolic connection but the operative point is respect and burial for the body part. cf Do surgically removed body parts require Kevurah? the comments on the question which ...


11

Bavli, Avoda Zara 27:1: אשה כמאן דמהילא דמיא a woman is like someone circumcised


11

In short, you need a Jewish person to do the circumcision לכתחילה. The basis for this is Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah Siman 264: "Every Jew is eligible to perform circumcision, including someone who is himself uncircumcised because his brothers had dies as a result of circumcision. If an adult Jewish male is present who knows how to circumcise he takes ...


10

Medrash Shochar Tov 9 says that Terach was born circumcised.


10

Normally the circumcision preformed by a physician is sufficient to meet the physical requirements of "milah" (circumcision), nevertheless a process known as "hatafas dam bris" (הטפת דם ברית) is necessary (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 268:1). In this process the Mohel draws a ritual drop of blood from the place of circumcision for the sake of the covenant. It ...


9

The Shearim Metzuyanim B'Halacha brings a Machlokes whether one should wear Tefilin at a Bris. The Shach, Magein Avraham, Chida, Taz and others say you should. However the Aters Tzvi and others say you should not.


9

I couldn't find the source of our Minhag to give the name only after the Bris and when it started, but I have an idea of why it is like this: In the case of Yitzchak the name was already known. Hashem gave it to the newborn even before there was a newborn, so there is no need to postpone it as we do today.


9

The Tashbatz in Siman 397 writes that it is inappropiate for a lady to be the Sandak even if her husband is the Mohel. The Rama in Yore Deah 265:11 writes that if a man is available a lady should not be Sandak as it is Peritzus.


9

A couple of other pertinent sources not cited here: - The Chida (Yosef Ometz 85) allows the MOTHER of the child to be a sandeket; - The Ben Ish Hai (Rav Peilim Helek 4, Sod Yesharim, 11) notes that the Zohar equates being a sandak with the bringing of the ketoret - a job reserved for men – such that, "l'hathila", a man should be the Sandak, but implying ...


9

There is a custom in Ashkenazic communities to have a married couple act as kvatter for newborn sons during the bris. It is their role to carry the boy from the mother to the father before the circumcision takes place. While the term may be a corruption of the German "godfather", I am not aware of any specific responsibility conferred after their role is ...


9

From part of my answer here: The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Volume 5, page 146) gives a very practical reason why Avraham waited to have a bris. Rashi explains that G-d's commandment to Noach after the flood, forbidding spilling a mans blood (Genesis 9:6) applies to spilling ones own blood as well. As such, Avraham was legally unable to circumcise ...


9

In order to convert one has to accept all the commandments, which includes circumcision. If one would clearly not want to accept one of the commandments no Orthodox Rabbi would do such a conversion. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pagefeed/hebrewbooks_org_12136_14.pdf


9

Circumcision is one of the Torah's 613 commandments (#86 of the רמב"ם's list; בראשית יז:י). A convert to Judaism has to accept all of them. If he does not accept even one of those commandments, he is not accepting Judaism, and has not converted. If he accepts that is a valid commandment but doesn't wish to fulfill it, he might as well not convert, so ...


9

No. Halacha requires Jewish males to be circumcised. The Shulchan Aruch states this with unusual strength in Yoreh Deya' 260-261: מִצְוַת עֲשֵׂה לָאָב לָמוּל אֶת בְּנוֹ, וּגְדוֹלָה מִצְוָה זוֹ מִשְּׁאָר מִצְוֹת עֲשֵׂה.‏ אִם לֹא מָל הָאָב אֶת בְּנוֹ, חַיָּבִים בֵּית דִּין לְמוּלוֹ. וְאִם לֹא מָלוּהוּ בֵּית דִּין, חַיָּב הוּא, כְּשֶׁיַּגְדִּיל, ...


9

This custom couldn't have been popular in times of the Amoraim since it is brought (BT Chullin 9a): ואמר רב יהודה אמר רב תלמיד חכם צריך שילמוד ג' דברים כתב שחיטה ומילה Trans. (Soncino): Rab Judah said in the name of Rab: A scholar must learn three things, viz.: writing, shechitah, and circumcision. R. Yitzchak Lampronti (d. 1756) writes in ...


8

The reaoson we do not name children until the Bris is based on the fact that Hashem changed Avraham's name in conjunction with his Bris at age 99. In addition, a boy receives the total Neshama at the Bris, and a person cannot be name until attaining that completion. (See Zohar - Lech Lecha 93a, Ta'amei Minhagim 929) Perhaps, Avraham knew that Yitzchok ...


8

The Divrei Malkiel writes (Vol 4, siman 86) that it is forbidden for a woman to be the sandek because being sandek is tantamount to being the mohel (because both assist in the actual performance of the bris), and a woman cannot be a mohel. see also responsa Mishna Halachos from the recently deceased Rabbi Menashe Klein (Second edition, vol 2, siman 162)


8

No they are not Jewish. Judaism is inherited from the mother. Having or not having a bris has no effect on if a person is Jewish. I'm a little surprised the child had a brit - usually the mohel (person doing the circumcision) checks first if the child is actually Jewish to avoid situations like this. Perhaps it was a medical circumcision not a brit? Also, ...


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