21

From Wikipedia: R' Menachem Mendel Kasher in an article in the periodical Sinai refutes many of [Gershom] Scholem's points (used to argue that Zohar was authored by R. Moshe De Leon). He writes: Many statements in the works of the Rishonim refer to Medrashim that we are not aware of. He writes that these are in fact references to the Zohar. This ...


21

The Sefer Eicha was destroyed by King Yehoyakim who threw it into a fire and rewritten by Yirmiyahu at the command of Hashem. Yirmiyahu 36:23 23: And it came to pass, when Jehudi read three or four verses, he rent it with a scribe's razor, and cast [it] onto the fire which was on the brazier until the entire roll was consumed on the fire that was on ...


13

R. Menachem Mendel Kasher, in Torah Shelaima (vol. 19 pg. 363) quotes several answers: Ein Yaakov (Peirush): this is to tell us that despite not being involved in any of the Bilaam story, Moshe was still told this story in all of its details exactly how it was written in the Chumash, and it has a similar status as Sefer Devarim, in that Moshe wasn't told ...


13

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


11

Regarding the broad question of later additions into the text of the Torah, this has certainly been the view held by various Orthodox Jews historically, including noted rabbis. To quote Dr. Marc Shapiro in Maimonides' Thirteen Principles: The Last Word in Jewish Theology?: Rabbinic sources speak of tikkun soferim, i.e. textual changes introduced by the ...


10

The traditional view: The Jewish Scripture, i.e. Tanakh, is made of 3 parts. The first part is the "Chumash", the five books of Moses. They were dictated word-by-word from G-d, and Moses wrote them down. (Now most of Deuteronomy is a big speech of Moses, but even so, after the fact that's what he was ordered to transcribe.) The last few verses describe ...


10

Hebrewbooks.org has a book with that title by R Shlomo Zalman Mirkash containing the ruling you reference about women and counting the Omer (available here).


10

The Maharal in Or Chadash on Megilas Esther explains that Hashem performs miracles in order to create a Kiddush Hashem. However, if the person involved in the rescue will take the credit then there is no Kiddush Hashem generated from this salvation, and it is therefore aborted. But, one who gives credit to whom it is due will surely make it known that it was ...


10

Two editions of Mishnayot I have on hand1 ascribe this commentary, the עיקר תוספות יום טוב, to R' Meshulam Katz. This Geni page attributes Ikkar Tosafot Yom Tov to R' Meshulam Katz, and identifies him as the Av Beit Din of Lvov, who died there in 1810. The text in the Geni page is apparently copied2 from a pedigree record included by R' Katz' great^3-...


9

Here is a link to Shiras Moshe which contains the poems of the Chasam Sofer.


9

In general, geulah seems to mean restoring something to its proper place (e.g. an enslaved person removed from his family/home or ancestral property removed from its owner). Chazal are perhaps noting that this is even the case with something as seemingly trivial as ascribing proper authorship where due. As such, one could suggest that once an idea/words are ...


9

The consensus of the majority of traditional and modern authorities is that the "Rashi on the Rif" is not written by Rashi, but rather by a different scholar around the 13th and 14th centuries. The following image is taken from the Oz V'hadar edition of Masectha Brachos, from page 3 of the introduction to the Rif. It is referring to a paragraph in which ...


8

According to Midrash Eicha Zuta, it was written by ירמיה (Jeremiah). This is also reflected in the Septuagint (aka LXX aka Targum Shivim), which opens with the line "By Jeremias, in the Captivity." This is probably the oldest tradition. According to Rashi, Midrash Tehillim (aka Midrash Secher Tov), Pesiqta Rabbatti, Ibn Ezra in his introduction to Tehillim,...


8

The discussion as to whether Yeshoshua wrote the last eight lines or Moshe wrote them "bedimah" (either with tears or "confused") applies only to those lines. And Moshe the servant of HaShem died in the land of Moav by the word of HaShem.[Devarim 34:5] On this verse Rashi quotes a famous debate regarding the last eight verses of the Tora; is it possible ...


8

Chida in Shem Hagedolim (page 7 of the file) quotes Seder Hadoros, who says that the commentary on Iyov isn't from Rashi. On that same page he also quotes someone who claims that none of the commentary on Neviim is from Rashi, although he disagrees with that.


8

The Babylonian Talmud (BB 14b) writes that the prophet Samuel wrote his eponymous book, the Book of Judges, and the Book of Ruth. For a likely Tiberian perspective, the Masorah in the back of the Leningrad Codex (here) concurs.


7

According to Avraham Grossman, in an article published by Encyclopedia Judaica ("Rashi"), there is more than one source for these various parenthetical notations. Some of them were composed by Rashi's students and some were composed by other scholars, but all were "later interpolated into the text by copyists". They can be identified by aid of manuscripts, "...


7

Halakha First of all, the question of authorship doesn't necessarily affect the Zohar's importance in halakha; I'm not sure why you think that this it would "obviously affect the way of poskining". The question of how Kabbalah affects Halacha is not a simple one, and does not really depend on the Zohar's authorship, because even if it were written by a ...


7

The author of בכור שור is Rabbi Alexander Sender Schor (1673-1737), author of Simlah Chadasha. He wrote בכור שור on many masechtos of Shas, including Kiddushin. All of בכור שור may be found in this sefer; the commentary to Kiddushin starts on page 444. I checked the first comment on דף ב, and it seems to match the commentary quoted in the ילקוט מפרשים (in ...


7

Apparently it is quoted by one of the Chasam Sofer's students, Rabbi Eliezer Lipman Naizatts, in his sefer Mei Menuchot, page 43a, as having been said by the Chasam Sofer in front of many of his students. Follow the link: http://parsha.blogspot.com/2011/06/chasam-sofers-position-that-zohar-is.html


7

According to the Talmud (Bava Basra 14b-15a), the authors were the following (order based on the Gemara there): Torah (Pentateuch) - Moshe (Perhaps Yehoshua wrote the last 8 Pesukim) Yehoshua (Joshua) - Yehoshua (Finished by Elazar Ben Aharon and Pinchas) Shoftim (Judges) - Shemuel Shemuel (Samuel) - Shemuel (Finished by Gad Hachozeh and Nasan Hanavi) ...


7

Below are a bunch of "controversial" statements from the Moreh Nevuchim. All quotes are from the Friedlander translation, with links to an online version of this translation. Similar to the disclaimer in this answer, not all controversial statements are equal. Some are very controversial, while others have other rishonim who agree with them. Because the ...


7

I don't believe there is a single set one, but a few with minor variations. Some of the classic Tenaim texts were collected in Sefer Nachalas Shiv'a, and another version was drafted by Rav Moshe Feinstein more recently. To the best of my knowledge, Rav Moshe's is the most commonly used in non-Hassidic Ashkenazi communities. (There are of course earlier ...


6

In Yeshurin 21 Page 65 Rabbi Ezra Shaivet says that there are those who attribute it to רבי עובדיה בן דוד, however it is still unclear whether this is accurate. He does not indicate who it is that attributes this to the רבי עובדיה בן דוד.


6

Parashath Bilaam is written with stories that Mosha Rabbeinu never experienced, for example the story with the donkey, no one was there but the donkey bilaam and the maloch. Also the sacrifices and such is from the perspective of bilaam and not Mosha Rabbeinu. Therefore, the gamoro in BB is saying that Mosha Rabbeinu did write it even though the perspective ...


6

If you look at the evidence used in that article about Elephantine etc., it is very poor; the assumptions being made seem ridiculous to me. The fact that someone wants you to write to them at Pesach time doesn't mean they don't know what date you will celebrate it. The fact that people weren't keeping the Shabbat day doesn't mean no one knew about it. ...


6

The Sha'ar Hatziyun is footnotes to his Mishna Berura as written by Rabbi Yisroel Meir Hakohen Kagan, author of the Chafetz Chaim. Other than to reference citations, the purpose of these footnotes is to typically bring short notes of interest that are tangentially related to the core topic.


6

Well, you wanted scholarly sources, so here is one in "Seventeenth Century Hebrew Books Volume 2" by Marvin J. Heller 2011 p. 665: Caro's authorship of Maggid Mesharim has been disputed. A number of writers, particularly those who did not wish to attribute a mystical work to a leading halakhic authority, questioned Caro's authorship, an attribution that ...


6

Firstly, another scholarly resource that confirms this is R. J. Ẕevi Werblowsky in The Character of R. Joseph Qaro's "Maggid" /לדמותו של המגיד של ר' יוסף קארו He states (fn 1, my rough translation) that all of the suspicions and claims that have been heard are null and void. (He also notes another book written on this topic, read the review here if you dare....


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