18

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


15

I heard once in a recording from R. Y.S. Schorr that Shamai represented a middas hadin, an exacting attitude of strict justice (as is evidenced by those very stories). His measuring stick was a display of just that point - everything had to be measured and exactly according to what was deserved.


15

The second quote is based on the Sermon of the Mount, from the Christian gospel book of Matthew (5:17). As to the first quote, the Soncino writes that "There is no passage in any known Gospel that a son and daughter inherit alike." Modern religious (eg., Steinsaltz) and academic scholars understand the philosopher living near Imma Shalom, who is quoted in ...


13

The Chassam Sofer seen here s.v. על רגל אחד says that Shammai besides being a Talmid Chacham was also a builder by trade, כי הוא היה תלמיד חכם וגם בנאי באמת הבנין. The apikores thought that a person must choose between being a good person who interacts with other people kindly, or one can dedicate their life to Hashem as a religious recluse. Shammai wanted ...


11

It is clear that angels have jealousy towards humans from Tosfiyos Brachos 3a that says that some say that we say certain prayers in Aramaic in order that the angels should not be jealous of us, and Tosfiyos does not say there is no jealousy, only that we say other prayers in Lashon Kodesh so that can not be the reason. Also Rashi Braishis 1:26 indicates ...


11

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


11

Just how many sources do you want? There are so many, like in almost any topic. Here are a few (limited to those specifically that indicate whether or not Chazal thought of drinking as favorable or frowned upon) A bit of Shas: Berachot 40a quotes an opinion that the Etz HaDaas was a grapevine, because we know that grapes cause sorrow to the world. ...


10

Mesechtas Shabbos 3a Shmuel says that every time it says Patur (exempt) by the laws of Shabbos it means Patur Avol Assur (exempt [from Korban/death], but still forbidden [rabbinically]) besides for 3 cases which are listed there. Rashi explains that means that it is 100% not permitted M'Drabanan. The carrying Gemara in the question says Patur.


10

This immediately follows another statement of R. Kahana's, which also quoted an exegesis of R. Nasan b. Minyome's in the name of R. Tanchum. Quoting another statement from the same people is pretty common in the Bavli. But there can be a deeper explanation also: Tora T'mima (ad loc.) shows that the brothers must not have known that the pit had snakes and ...


9

Indeed, the Beit Yosef (OC 36) cites the Gemara you reference and claims that the ש should have a pointed base. The Peri Megadim (EA end of 32) is unsure if this is a necessary component of the letter. The Keset HaSofer (5:2:ש) implies it would be Kosher Bedieved, but one should be very careful to avoid a flat base. The Mishna Berura (Mishnat Sofrim ש) is ...


9

Bartenura Shabbat 1:1: ולהכי נקט הוצאה בלשון עני ועשיר, דאגב אורחיה קמ״ל דמצוה הבאה בעבירה אסורה וחייבין עליה:‏ The reason for discussing carrying between domains in the context of a poor and rich person, is to teach something tangential, namely that a mitzvah performed via an aveirah [i.e. giving charity while carrying on shabbat] is forbidden, ...


8

Perhaps Shabbat 156a-b? The phrase also appears once in Nedarim 32a.


8

Here is what I could dig up about him: He lived sometime in the (late) second century. This is evident from Shabbos 23b which places him at the same time as Rav Huna who passed away in 296 (wikipedia). He had two children named Rav Iddi and Rav Chiya (Gemora there). He lived in Bavel as is evident from the story with Rav Huna. Rav Huna began lecturing in ...


8

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


8

Rabbi S.R. Hirsch writes that the story cannot be understood like this, because then the vote would be meaningless. He explains that Beis Hillel had been refusing a formal vote, and Beis Shammai on that day gathered outside the building and forcefully prevented Beis Hillel from leaving until a vote was held. Beis Hillel were the majority, but Beis Shammai ...


8

There is a book called שער הכולל that aims to explain the choices made in that version of the siddur. The author notes the following in regard to the phrase ובין איש לאשתו (chapter 1, paragraph 19): במשנה שלפנינו לא נמצאו התיבת הללו אבל בסדר היום ובשער השמים משל״ה מביאים הלשון הזה גם בתד״א פי״ג לענין אהרן הכהן מביא זה הלשון בין אדם לחבירו ובין איש ...


8

1) Tosfos to Shabbos 11a (as well as the Ran and others) answers that prayer on 33a refers to Krias Shema specifically. כגון רבי שמעון בן יוחי וחבריו - והא דאמר לקמן (דף לנ:) כי הוה מטי (זמן תפלה) לביש ומכסי ומצלי ההוא מצלי היינו ק"ש: 2) The Sefer Yosef Daas on Shabbos 11a suggests that according to the Rambam he still prayed one Shemonah Esrei a day, so ...


7

There are numerous Talmudic sources which refer to a "Golden Jerusalem", these sources, however, are not referring to the actual city of Jerusalem but to a piece of jewelry which was colloquially referred to as "Golden Jerusalem" or "Golden City". It was probably a tiara which was engraved to resemble a city skyline. That being said, the song Yerushalyim ...


7

Here is Jastrow on Eivara (a limb), and Ivra (to be sure). He says that the latter comes from A-V-R, which is a lashon of strength in Aramaic.


6

Tosfos answer, because a miracle occurred for the sake of his wearing tefillin. Only if he were wearing tefillin properly, i.e. with a clean body, would he merit such a miracle.


6

in chovos halevavos gate 9 ch.5 Do so in your heart and mind if you are unable to free your body to matters of the next world due to being so fully engaged with providing for your livelihood and maintenance, as our Rabbis mentioned on many (great men), who would toil in matters of this world, while being separate from it (in heart and mind), such ...


6

Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata (16:18, cf. footnotes 69, 82) notes that the practice is to be lenient and cites the following from Orchot Chayim (Shabbat 261) to try and justify the practice, though in closing with a reference to the Beiur Halacha (303:18 sv. Ki) he indicates how weak he believes the justification is. וכן האשה לא תצא בדבר שהוא חוצץ בפני ...


6

Yes, the incantation will work today, but only if you are precise in your pronunciation of the Hebrew letters, in the manner that Chazal historically pronounced them. This is the only incantation which is not superstition, because it makes total rational sense that it will work. As I explain here: by holding the same food over his head, he stretches his ...


5

Excellent question! Of course Hashem is everywhere. In some times and places, we perceive His presence more strongly. In those instances, we say that the Shechinah is present. An analogy for this concept is radio waves. They're (pretty much) everywhere, but we can only "tune into" them when we have a receiver (i.e. a radio). Sorry - I don't remember the ...


5

Meshech Chochmah (Parashat Bechukotai) explains the difference between Zechut Avot (s.v. באופן here) and Brit Avot (in the top-left paragraph here) as follows: If one invests in his friend's business, and subsequently sees his friend's children carrying on the business in the same good way as the father, he will be inclined to continue investing in the ...


5

I don't know how these words are said, I'm guessing the vowelization is גַרְעִינִין or גַרְעֵינִין or maybe גַרְעֵינְיָן? Either way, unless you're trying to be particularly makpid on pronunciation, ayin-tsere-malei or ayin-hirik-malei sound a lot like their aleph-based counterparts. Languages also tend to be forgiving when there's no easily-confusable ...


5

The rambam in de'os writes that it is forbidden to drink in the afternon (when you will get drunk) based of the Mishnah in avos (3: 10). The Orchos Chaim is also in the Kol Bo, and their source is the Meoros to Megillah 7b who also writes that there is no greater sin than drunkenness. Rabbeinu Avraham Ben HaRambam writes (p. 556 in English Feldheim ed.) ...


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