The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
14

To first clarify, even though lying is usually frowned upon, I'm pretty sure that, at least ethically speaking, there's no reason to frown upon lying to Pharaoh in this situation if it was necessary to save the Jews. The question being dealt with here is why was this deception necessary - couldn't God have saved them without the lie? Thanks to this shiur, I'...


11

You had a number of very good suggestions. Ibn Ezra to Exodus 2:10 suggests 2 possibilities, namely, that Pharaoh's daughter had learned the Hebrew language, or that she asked someone how to say this phrase (and the name was translated from a similar Egyptian name): אולי למדה בת פרעה לשונינו או שאלה. Shadal there (same link) quotes Abarbanel saying that ...


7

The number of people in a generation is (N/2) * x where N is the number of people in the previous generation and x is the number of children each couple has. If N_0 = 70 and x = 6, after 10 generations, there would be over 4 million children. And that's assuming everyone in all previous generations had died.


7

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? So ...


7

My favorite commentator when it comes to understanding the differences of meanings between words (that may seem like synonyms) is the Malbim. He has some wonderful and minute distinctions between such pairs, and he holds to them throughout his commentary on the Tanach. These small differences can open a wide world of new understandings. Luckily, he does ...


6

The Baal Haturim there connects the idea of being armed with the number five; corresponding to the five types of weapons mentioned in Yechezkel. וחמושים. מזויינים על שם חמשה מיני כלי זיין הנזכרים בפסוק מגן וצנה ורומח וחצים ומקל יד דכתיב (יחזקאל לט, ט) ויצאו יושבי ערי ישראל ובערו והשיקו בנשק ומגן וצנה בקשת ובחצים ובמקל יד וברומח.‏


6

Some thoughts from Rabbi Kaplan's Living Torah on that passuk. He writes that moshe means son in Egyptian. He quotes Ibn Ezra & Hadar Zekenim who say this and uses this idea to translate the passuk as "he became to her as a son". Rabbi Kaplan continues and writes: Significantly the suffix moshe is found (and exclusively so) in the names of many ...


6

Rashi to Numbers 10:34: Seven times is the word ענן used in the account of their journeys alluding to four clouds which screened them on all four sides, one that was above them, one beneath their feet, and one in front of them which leveled the elevations and raised the depressions, and killed all serpents and scorpions Translation from Sefaria So,...


5

Side note See mishnayos Zevachim, 14:4-8, where different time periods are mentioned for when "במות" (altars outside of the Temple/Tabernacle) where permitted; you are correct in your assumption that they are currently forbidden (ibid., 8). Real answer The verse you cited in your question, according to Rashi (ibid.), refers to the Altar of the Tabernacle, ...


5

The Ibn Ezra says he is surprised at why there is a new paragraph here. He doesn't answer his question, but he says the one who divided the sections must have had a good reason, because he is much smarter than we are.


5

This is addressed in Brachos 55a. The reason given is that he conducted himself ברבנות. Seemingly an excessive degree of acting in command. דא״ר חמא בר חנינא מפני מה מת יוסף קודם לאחיו מפני שהנהיג עצמו ברבנות This is brought as a proof to Rabbi Yehuda's statement there that all who conduct themselves this way will have their lives shortened.


5

The issue derived from the verse No hand shall touch it, for he shall be stoned or cast down; whether man or beast, he shall not live. When the ram's horn sounds a long, drawn out blast, they may ascend the mountain. Seems to be not one of defense, but of legal culpability as the two methods of death refer to 2 technical types of death penalty. As Rashi ...


5

Sotah 12a: (שמות ב, ב) ותרא אותו כי טוב הוא תניא ר"מ אומר טוב שמו ר' יהודה אומר טוביה שמו רבי נחמיה אומר הגון לנביאות אחרים אומרים נולד כשהוא מהול וחכמים אומרים בשעה שנולד משה נתמלא הבית כולו אור כתיב הכא ותרא אותו כי טוב הוא וכתיב התם (בראשית א, ד) וירא אלהים את האור כי טוב ”And she saw him, that he was ‘tov’ [good]”. It was taught in a Braisa:...


4

Check out http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/tohen.asp?id=676 חלק א . By the way - read the rest of the book too. It is amazing.


4

Both Rash"i and Ramba"n citing Rash"i on this verse say that G-d was speaking to Moses for 7 days in total. The last reference, "since You first spoke to Your servant" refers to the very beginning when G-d first asked Moses to go to Pharaoh. Moses seems to refer to the 1st day.


4

Art Scroll commentaries deal with this question. In Va'eira 9:3 ArtScroll points out that 9:2 uses the phrase that are in the field implying that only the animals in the fields would be in danger. There are also some who say that it affected those types of animals that are normally kept in the fields and not those that are normally kept in the barns. Rashi ...


4

According to the medrash, after Moshe was put into the water, the astrologers (who had warned him before) came and told him that the baby he was worried about had been cast into the Nile. Thus, he did not anticipate that Moshe would be that leader. Note that he only made the decree on the newborns so that he could get away with this for the short period of ...


4

The redemption of every first born child is mandatory as we see in the pesukim that I reference. Shmos Bo 13:13 And every firstborn donkey you shall redeem with a lamb, and if you do not redeem [it], you shall decapitate it, and every firstborn of man among your sons, you shall redeem. Additionally, Bamidbar Korach 18:15 Every first issue of the ...


4

Rabbi Yochanan Zweig asks this very question. He gives a beautiful and simple answer: the worst thing you can do for a person is to label them as a problem. Once they have a negative label placed on them, you can pretty much do whatever you want to them, and the public will view it as “they had it coming.” In this passuk, the Mitzriim do just that to the ...


4

According to Perush Kadmon (printed in Mossaf HaRav Kook's Torat Hayyim Haggada), וירעו means calculated evil. Therefore the citation about deliberation and planning is appropriate. This is quoted by the Shibbolei HaLeket as well in his commentary to the Haggada (found in Shibbolei HaLeket 218). Alternatively, as noted by @Eliyahu, the KolBo (here) that it ...


4

M'tzudas Tziyun on the spot suggests a way to reconcile both descriptions as the same cloud: it led them when they were moving and covered them when they were stationary. The predictability of this behavior could facilitate picturing it, like fog rolling from one position to another. למסך. כן יקרא הסכך אשר ממעל גם המחיצה לפנים כמו ואת מסך הפתח (שמות כז) ...


4

Rashi says: THAT HE WAS GOODLY — When he was born the whole house became filled with light (Sotah 12a). Ramban says: All women love their children, whether they are beautiful or not; and certainly, all the Jewish mothers in Egypt hid their children as long as they could. Consequently, why does the verse need to emphasize that she saw he was ...


4

I am surprised by the question, because the answer is explicate in the Torah text (Exodus 1:9): וַיֹּ֖אמֶר אֶל־עַמּ֑וֹ הִנֵּ֗ה עַ֚ם בְּנֵ֣י יִשְׂרָאֵ֔ל רַ֥ב וְעָצ֖וּם מִמֶּֽנּוּ׃ And he said to his people, “Behold, the people, the Children of Israel are more numerous and stronger than we." (Artscroll translation) As to how a smaller population could ...


3

Ibn Ezra on the Pasuk writes: וימת מלך מצרים. עתה יוכל משה לשוב אל מצרים. וישראל עשו תשובה. כי יחזקאל הזכיר שהיו ישראל עובדים גלולי מצרים. על כן ענם השם ותחת אשר לא עבדוהו עבדו אכזרים And the king of Egypt died- Now Moshe could return to Egypt. And Israel had done repentance. For Yechezkel mentioned* that Bnai Yisrael were worshipers of the egyptian ...


3

The Kli Yakar says that it is to emphasize that the verse stands alone - it is telling us that Hashem spoke to Moshe by day, and not at night, unlike all the other prophets.


3

(No sources; this is my own thinking.) We learn that we must take positive action to affirm our relationship with God and k'lal Yisrael. Yisraelites who merited being spared from this affliction were nonetheless affected if they did not take action. We learn that we sometimes must take public action to affirm our status as Yisraelim. The blood was placed ...


3

For your first question about needing to be told that the bull cannot be eaten, see this answer. Your other question is asks why we care about ownership; we care because there are uses for the carcass besides food. An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They ...


3

Opinion that Moshe and Aron had separate staffs. The Abarbenel Parshas B'shalch 17:1 writes that Moshe Rabbeinu was buried with his staff . This was done because Moshe was the greatest Navi and HaShem didn't want anyone else using this powerful tool. Text: אברבנאל שמות פרק יז ומפני שהיה המטה כלי האלהי יתברך לפעול הנפלאות נמסר לאדון הנביאים ואף יהושע ...


3

I think it's a combination of Midrashim - one that says that Moshe's stick was previously Yaakov's, and the other that saying that this bolt was Yaakov's: The Yalkut Shimoni (168) writes that Moshe's stick had quite some history. It originated with Adam's banishment from Gan Eden, and was used by the Avos, etc. It was Yaakov that took it to Mitzraim, though ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible