8

Very short answer: Hashem wants creative beings in His own "Image" more than He wants any particular event.* So far that's just a paraphrase of Loewian's answer. We can go one step closer to the ineffable "Mind" of G-d and explore why that would be. First, the Greatest Good is G-d Himself. Your person who cannot sin isn't receiving that Good, because who ...


6

Rambam Hilchot Teshuvah 5:4 ואל תתמה ותאמר היאך יהיה האדם עושה כל מה שיחפוץ ויהיו מעשיו מסורים לו וכי יעשה בעולם דבר שלא ברשות קונו ולא חפצו והכתוב אומר כל אשר חפץ ה' עשה בשמים ובארץ דע שהכל כחפצו יעשה ואף על פי שמעשינו מסורין לנו כיצד כשם שהיוצר חפץ להיות האש והרוח עולים למעלה והמים והארץ יורדים למטה והגלגל סובב בעיגול וכן שאר בריות העולם להיות כמנהגן ...


5

Some of the disagreements in earlier answers seem to stem from different understandings of peer review. From the definition stated in the question, it seems totally reasonable to think of disagreements in the mishna and gemarah, or in the rishonim, achronim, and later works, as constituting peer review. Those who disagree are typically "people with similar ...


4

Artscroll (introduction to Selichot) quotes the Maharal of Prague as writing strongly against supplications addressed to angelic advocates. Why may one seek the intercession of human intermediaries [the avot and imaot], yet be prohibited from beseeching the angels to advocate his case? Man is commanded to perform acts of kindness with his fellow ...


4

If you have laboured in תורה, that itself is success, you have had a successful life (day, week whatever). merriam-webster.com defines success as a "favorable or desired outcome".The mitzvah is לימוד התורה not ידיעת התורה. Furthermore חז"ל tell us לפום צערא אגרא. If you have toiled you have been successful.


3

I didn't want to go to work this morning. I was tired and wanted to go back to sleep. Yet I put myself in the car and drove here, to work. Let's try the question with my name rather than Hashem: -- I did nothing today against my will. Ergo, when I drive to work, that's also my will. Yet we know that I did not want to go to work, so it's against my will. ...


3

Just being published in the Talmud is a form of Peer Review. Not everything that Rabbi Akiva ever said has been written & published, only the things that his peers felt were valuable. And everyone who publishes a Sefer gets an Haskamah / approbation from their mentors & peers. Jews have been practicing peer review for millennia.


2

From Rabbi Uri Sherqi: In the words of Rabbi Tzvi Yehudah Kook, “Hashem needs their to be evil in the world. But, there’s no mizwah to volunteer.” If someone were to commit a sin absolutely Leshem Shamayim, it may be considered a mizwah. The problem is that there is a hazaqah on mankind that sins Leshem Shamayim are incredibly rare. And, if you commit the ...


2

Assumptions 1, and therefore 2, are at least partly false. That nothing happens against the divine will is only true when one looks at the contextual greater picture. But without context i.e. at the "micro" level, choices are made against His will all the time, whenever people sin. He allows this for the same reason that He allows suffering - as part of a ...


2

More than 50% of mishnayos have multiple tanaim disagreeing. That's peer review. R' Meir says something, R' Yehuda reviews it and says something else. When nobody disagrees explicitly, the assumption is they reviewed it and agreed (הלכה כסתם משנה). It's exactly the same in the Gemara.


2

Sefer HaChinuch 343 says: So why did the verse divide them?" [That is] meaning to say, why did it divide them and not write, "Give neither your money nor your food with interest." "To cause the transgression of two prohibitions" - meaning to say, to give multiple warnings about it (Bava Metzia 61a). And this matter is what I have said above (Sefer ...


1

Peer-review as we know it today was quite impossible in the past. Also in science is is very recent. For Halachic decisions, the basic "peer-review" in Judaism is the Beis Din, and in the past all Rabbis who wrote responsa either wrote them as part of sitting in a Beis Din, or expected them to be approved by a responsible Beis Din. For theoretical ...


1

Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that he skipped it -- Orach Chaim 5, #43. (Though it sounds like he followed the Chasam Sofer -- skip it yourself, but say it if you're chazan at a shul that does.)


1

אם יאמר לך אדם: יש חכמה בגוים - תאמן... (ואם יאמר לך אדם) יש תורה בגוים - אל תאמן מדרש איכה רבה פרשה ב סימן יג If someone tells you there is wisdom among the nations - believe them. (If someone tells you) there is Torah among the nations - do not believe them. The Midrash draws the distinction between Torah and Chachma (wisdom), in that wisdom ...


1

I'll try an answer as well - I think the other answers have been converging on the same idea. Short answer: #3 is a false statement. Longer answer : The premise ("Hashem wants us not to sin") does not imply the conclusion ("sinning is against His will"). This is because, as has been alluded to by the other answers, the "wants not to sin" refers to the ...


1

Rashi means exactly as he says:do not inquire of the future. Science and natural law do not tell us of the future, they are extrapolations of the present, and that's allowed.


1

Heard from רב פדר... A person by nature is insecure about the future. It is scary. Who knows what will happen? He gets worried. He has great fears. So what does he do? He often seeks out a certain method to get a sneak peak at the future. He seeks out a fortune teller or the stars to tell the future. But the point is that those concerns about the ...


1

In Emunot V'Deiot 2:13 R. Saadia Gaon writes: It will not, therefore, praise Him for being able to cause five to be more than ten without adding anything to the former, nor for being able to put the world through the hollow of a signet ring without making the one narrower and the other wider, nor for being able to bring back the day gone by in its ...


1

Isaiah (45:1) refers to Cyrus as the Messiah because of his role in returning Jews from exile (source) but it would seem that the general populace's concept of a personal Moshiach developed closer to the end of the second temple period Rise of Popular Belief in a Personal Messiah: Not until after the fall of the Maccabean dynasty, when the despotic ...


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