12

The Bavli, M'gila 10, clarifies that once the temple in Jerusalem was built there is no longer anywhere else we can offer sacrificial offerings. Its holiness is forever and precludes other sites. Rambam (Bes Hab'chira 1:3) rules accordingly.


10

The Ha'amek Davar offers two explanations: His first answer is that a there was a constant miracle that the bread always stayed fresh for the week between its baking and its consumption. Similarly, the original bread miraculously stayed fresh for many months. His preferred answer is that the original bread was made by Betzalel just to demonstrate what it ...


10

This question is addressed by several Acharonim. R. Pinchas Horowitz says that during the 7 days of inauguration Moshe did not erect the Mishkan by himself. Since multiple people did the act together it was not a violation of Shabbat labor. Panim Yafos Parshas Naso ונראה דהקמת כל שבעה ימים לא היה ע"י משה עצמו כמו כל מלאכת המשכן שנעשה ע"י אחרים ונקרא ע"...


9

“Mikdash” is a more generic term for a “holy place” or (following Rav S. R. Hirsch) a “sorce of holiness”. The Mishkan was the specific Mikdash built in the desert. (Note the same root SH-K-N in mishkan and v’shakhanti.) For your second question, God is not promising merely to dwell in the tent built for Him but to be an active Presence within the nation: “...


9

Even if the threads are fairly fine (and we don't know if they were), two colors plied together still looks like two colors, not the combined color. Thread is not like paint. Now even if at the usual viewing distance most people would see it as the combined color, it would not look that way close up, like to the kohein wearing the garment or tending to the ...


9

The Talmud (M'nachos 96a) explains that David and his coterie were in mortal danger of starving at the time, which legally supersedes the prohibition against them eating showbread. Another approach, mentioned by the Radak (ad loc.), is that the loaves were loaves from a korban todah (thanksgiving offering) that a non-priest could consume while in a state ...


9

Here is a YouTube video of someone's actual Minecraft model of the (first) Beit Hamikdash. If building based on that isn't enough, they provide some links in the video description. Disclaimer: I don't do Minecraft and have no idea if these links will help. Map, Skin, Interactive tour Some comments there suggest a few improvements (quartz?) which you may ...


8

The Mishna (Zevachim 3:1) states: כל הפסולין ששחטו שחיטתן כשרה שהשחיטה כשרה בזרים בנשים ובעבדים ובטמאים אפילו בקדשי קדשים Anyone who is invalid for Temple service who slaughtered [a sacrifice], the slaughter is valid, for slaughtering [sacrifices] is valid even for non-priests, women, slaves and even impure people, even for the holiest of sacrifices. ...


8

Rashi says it was the outer, Copper Mizbeach that was covered. This makes sense to me, since it was supposed to be a sign to Bnei Yisroel, and only the Kohanim really see the Gold Mizbeach. However, this certainly raises the question 'how is coating the Copper Mizbeach with more copper is a sign?' It seems like this was a permanent covering, but I can't ...


8

R' Hirsch (e.g. in the long comment at the end of Ex. 25:1-8) takes the four types of thread used in Mishkan construction to represent four basic aspects of life that we humans need to strive to perfect within ourselves and unify in the service of God: Linen, from the flax plant = Vegetative - consumption and reproduction Wool died red with worm blood = ...


8

I'm still hoping someone has a sourced answer, but I came up with a possible answer last night - reverse order. I was learning Shabbos 104a, where the Gemara gives a really nice explaination of the meaning behind the order/shape of the letters in the alef-bet, and how it reflects the actions and reward of a Tzadik. Since the luchot could be read from both ...


7

From Rashi to Shabat 73:1 on the Mishna: ".. and writes one letter in one (plank) and another one in the adjacent". From here we learn that there was only 1 letter in each one. But the letters were written in pairs (one for each plank) that's the reason why the melacha speaks of 2 letters. א-א, ב-ב, ג-ג... Although I didn't find a source for it but the ...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 2A-3B) actually uses this verse to prove that a Mikdash is sometimes called a Mishkan. (Actually, that Gemara actually says that "Mikdash" and "Mishkan" are interchangeable terms). The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that according to Rashi (the simple explanation of the text), one cannot say that "Veshanchanti Besocham" is a result of "Veasu ...


7

With thanks to Danny Schoemann who pointed me at a reference to what I’d remembered without a source. Here is how the Torah describes the tabernacle altar (Shemot 27:8): נְבוּב לֻחֹת תַּעֲשֶׂה אֹתוֹ; כַּאֲשֶׁר הֶרְאָה אֹתְךָ בָּהָר, כֵּן יַעֲשׂוּ׃ Hollow with planks shalt thou make it; as it hath been shown thee in the mount, so shall they make it. ...


7

How about Yoav (Melachim I, 2:29)? He goes into "Ohel Hashem" (literally translated as Tabernacle in some places), and holds onto the "horns of the altar". Yoav was not a cohen (relative of King David), and if I'm not mistaken, neither is the guy who is sent in after him (Binayahu Ben Yehoyada). Also, in similar vein you've got Adoniah (Melachim I 1:50), ...


7

The beams were made of a type of wood, which has a specific gravity of less than 1 relative to water (therefore wood floats.) see Wikipedia Table of specific gravity in article on Relative Gravity.) The kerashim boards had two pegs which were set into bases ("Addanim") made of one cubit deep by one cubit wide by one cubit high of solid, melted silver made ...


6

Ralbag at the end of Sefer Shemos gives several thoughts as to why the Torah repeats the details of the vessels in the account of the mishkan's construction. The possibilities he considers are: People at that time told stories like this in a repetitive fashion, and the Torah is merely immitating the expository style of the time. There are plenty of sections ...


6

Dafdigest for Eruvin 105. I have extracted parts of the article which speaks about workers working in the Temple on the plating which was fastened on the walls of the Kodesh Kodoshim. The inside walls of this special chamber were plated with gold panels, which were attached to the walls by artisans and workmen (see Mishnah Middos, 4:1,5). If we do ...


6

The Torah is explicit about a rationale for [at least some part of] this command: וְיִֽהְי֥וּ לְא֖וֹת לִבְנֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵֽל let them serve as a symbol to the people of Israel and זִכָּר֞וֹן לִבְנֵ֣י יִשְׂרָאֵ֗ל לְ֠מַעַן אֲשֶׁ֨ר לֹֽא יִקְרַ֜ב אִ֣ישׁ זָ֗ר אֲ֠שֶׁר לֹ֣א מִזֶּ֤רַע אַהֲרֹן֙ ה֔וּא לְהַקְטִ֥יר קְטֹ֖רֶת לִפְנֵ֣י ה' וְלֹֽא יִהְיֶ֤ה ...


6

Rabbi Chaim Kanievski (in Taamah Dkrah) deduces from the Gemarah in Menachot 89a [top of the page] that pure gold is not required when only the term 'זָהָב' is used (without 'טָהוֹר') and points out that only those items located in the Heichal (the Aron, Shulchan, Menorah, and Mizbach Haktores) were required to have pure gold. I think he may be implying that ...


5

The Mishnayot in the last chapter of Zevachim outline the journey of the Tabernacle. When the Jews arrived in Israel: The Tabernacle was in Gilgal for the 14 years of capturing and dividing the land. It then moved to Shiloh for 369 years. When Shiloh was destroyed (I Samuel 4), the Tabernacle was moved to Nov until it too was destroyed (I Samuel 22:19) ...


5

I think I understand your question to be leaning more towards philosophy, however the question works in a broader sense as well, so I'll answer the basic question as worded in the heading, "Why are Melochos based on the construction of the Mishkan?" The simplest answer to this question is that the Mishkan needed to be constructed almost entirely from ...


5

Six additional answers: The Chasam Sofer (Toras Moshe, Vayakhel) explains that Moshe did not really construct the Mishkan by himself; it just looked like he was building it but in reality it was constructed by divine intervention (see Rashi on Shmos 40:18). The Tchebiner Rav (Dovev Meisharim 1:63) writes that since it was only constructed for that day, ...


5

The Smag (Rav Moshe miCoucy 12th century) Mitzva Lo taaseh 309 (Also Sefer Hachinuch Mitzva 390) based on the Gemora in Yoma 24b says that there were 3 "rituals" that a Zor - non Cohen was allowed to do inside the Beis Hamikdash (Temple) or the Mishkan (tabernacle) (Shavuos 16b both Mishkan and Mikadash are equivelant משכן אקרי מקדש ומקדש אקרי משכן), even ...


5

By way of prefatory remarks I will include this Ibn Ezra on the verse mentioned as a precursor to any information below, and by doing so we can then remain level-headed. ומי יוכל לשער כמה זהב צפוי כל כלי המשכן We cannot really properly assess the gold in the Mishkan. Additionally, in the Ralbag cited, he proceeds those statements by saying that we ...


4

God's overarching command to build the Mishkan is Shemot 25:8: וְעָשׂוּ לִי מִקְדָּשׁ וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְּתוֹכָם And they shall make Me a sanctuary and I will dwell in their midst. R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary1 on this verse, explains that its two clauses present two intertwined purposes for this construct, each alluded two by one of ...


4

Rashi says that Hashem set this up in order to honor Moshe. Once he set it up then it became possible for the Leviim to continue setting it up and taking it down. My son said at his son's bris (Yom shlishi Parshas Pekudei) that because of the kedusha of the mishkan, not even Moshe could (physically) put up the walls. Hashem had Moshe act and He caused the ...


4

Ⅱ Chronicles 35:11 describes non-priest levites' slaughtering[1] and skinning sacrificial animals. [1] according to the commentary of M'tzudas David inter alia


4

Inside it will only be seen by Cohanim, and not many of them either. On the outside alter it was seen by Leviim and Yisroelim. Edit: It is supposed to be constant reminder for the generations to see, point to, and learn from. Subtle signs are hardly enough for hotheads. We want to stop them long before they are holding by forcing their way in.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible