12

There is a teshuva of the Rema in which he writes that if you find a Teshuva of the Gaonim, you could follow its opinion. I asked R' Zvi Berkowitz about this and he said this was restricted specifically to the period of the Gaonim, because the Rishonim themselves (on whom much of our codification is based) would have taken the position of the Gaon into ...


12

It's perfectly plausible that God commanded, for instance, to use designs similar to existing idolatrous ones, and instead turn them on their head by modifying them to build the Tabernacle. Similarly, the Torah quotes the curses that were written by professionals before Sichon went to battle against Moab. They were written by someone else, but for whatever ...


12

ב"ה Hope this helps. http://members.bib-arch.org/publication.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=29&Issue=5&ArticleID=9 The finding: Reed huts more than 3,000 years old belonging to workers—perhaps slaves—and with the same floor plan as ancient Israelite four-room houses have been identified at Medinet Habu, opposite Luxor in Egypt.1 These reed huts ...


9

In the early 19th Century a papyrus, dating from the end of the Middle Kingdom, was found in Egypt. It was taken to the Leiden Museum in Holland and interpreted by A.H. Gardiner in 1909. The complete papyrus can be found in the book Admonitions of an Egyptian from a heiratic papyrus in Leiden. The papyrus describes violent upheavals in Egypt, ...


9

You make a mistake in assuming that in order for something to be divine it must be completely original. To understand the Torah and G-d's intentions and its applicability to modern times does not require cutting off and ignoring the societal backdrop of the Torah's historical time period. This means that although there may be some slight similarities in ...


6

The text of 1QIsaᵃ (The so-called "Great Isiah Scroll") is very close to the masoretic text (M). Most of the differences are orthographic. 1QIsaᵃ usually is fuller, employing more matres lectionis (e.g. כי in M vs. כיא in 1QIsaᵃ in verse 1:2). Other small differences exist due to pronunciation (e.g. עוזיהו in M and עיזיה in 1QIsaᵃ in verse 1:1). Letters or ...


6

Biblical Archaeology Review has a list of 53 people that archaeology has confirmed in the bible. All of these are things that are generally agreed upon by the scientific community (although just as with any community of people, there are always some outliers in every direction). It includes ketuvim too so it's a little broader than your question in that ...


6

I don't know if they address this concern particularly in terms of the expense. However, the knowledge that murex indigo is chemically identical to plant-based indigo is something knowable only in the 20th and 21st century, when we know about atoms, molecules, and chemicals. If plant-based indigo failed the gemara's test for fastness, and this was just a ...


6

The Challenge of Creation by R. Natan Slifkin Torah, Chazal, and Science by R. Moshe Meiselman These two books contain very different approaches; in fact, the latter may be considered largely a rebuttal to the former. Between the two of them, you should be able to cover the main approaches.


5

Depending on what you mean exactly, the answer is yes and no. In terms of the actual canonized text of the TaNa"Ch, no, it is final and closed. There are very few instances of deviation between traditional texts, and they are all documented and accounted for. One example of potential "changes" or "improvements" actually was discovered in the Dead Sea ...


5

I posted my question as a follow-up to the one mentioned in the comments above. Rabbi Dov Lior answered it at http://www.yeshiva.org.il/ask/?id=77609 as follows (translation mine): אין ליהנות מהם, אך לימוד אינו נחשב הנאה – כי קול ומראה וריח אין בהם משום הנאה.‏ One may not derive benefit from them, but study is not considered benefit – since [as a ...


4

I'll give it a try. There are some inaccuracies in your question that should be clarified before considering the question of Ankhmahor as Yosef. This is not "the earliest archeological evidence we have for Bris Milah." It was once thought to be, but that award now goes to a recently discovered relief fragment of two children being circumcised, found in the ...


4

Check out http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/tohen.asp?id=676 חלק א . By the way - read the rest of the book too. It is amazing.


3

The Seder Olam Zuta (the basic Jewish book of chronology, compiled just after the sealing of the Talmud) says in Perek Rishon, Halacha Daled, משנולד יצחק אבינו עד שיצאו ישראל ממצרים ארבה מאות שנה) היא שנת שני אלפים ארבה מאות ארבעים ושמונה ליצירה (From the time Yitzchak was born until the the time the Jews left Egypt was four hundred years,) which was in ...


3

Not a book but otherwise fits exactly what you ask: R Amnon Bazak has a series of written shiurim on Tanakh and Archaeology in English, see shiurim 6a to 6i. He offers a fairly comprehensive review of the archaeological record in regard to Tanakh. He states there is no archaeological evidence that contradicts the Torah - actually he writes there are many ...


3

Rabbi Michael Shelomo Bar-on actually wrote a book on this topic called Oral Torah from Sinai:The case for the authenticity of the Oral Torah relating to this topic. You can also see his works on Acaedemia.edu. Where he specializes in the topic of Archaeology and Tanach. Additionally here is his personal website. Hope this is helpful


3

The Western Wall Heritage Foundation offers the very popular Western Wall Tunnels Tour, which takes tourists under Jerusalem's Muslim Quarter, along the length of the western retaining wall of Herod's expansion of the Temple Mount ("Kotel Hama'aravi"). On this tour, you get to see different shapes and sizes of stones in the wall from different eras, going ...


3

Immortality, Resurrection and the Age of the Universe: A Kabbalistic View by Rabbi Kaplan discusss many of these topics. See the table of contents: The age of the universe Longevity and immortality in Judaic sources On the resurrection Astrology: stars and angles Male and female


2

The Riddle of the Exodus by James Long adheres fairly well to Orthodox religious beliefs (it was recommended to me by an Orthodox Rabbi), and discusses much of the relevant archaeology. The book's focus is, like the title, on the Exodus: showing that the decline of the great empire of Egypt corresponds with the time of the Biblical story of its destruction ...


2

Eretz Chemda 28 says that the Western Wall / Kosel HaMaaravi was originally built by King David. I sent an e-mail to Aish and received the following response. As for the story about the angels saying "This Wall, the work of the poor, shall never be destroyed" -- a book called “Agadot Eretz Yisrael” by Ze’ev Vilnai records and notes that it is "a ...


2

Some books that I suggest that take a more Torah orientated view on Archeology: מקרא מול ארכיאולוגיה by דניאל משה לוי, יוסף רוטשטיין (Reuven Mass Publishing, 2011) cover many psukim of Tanach with archeological findings. Daniel Moshe Levi is an Archeologist expert from Bar-Ilan University. There is an interesting article here in which they deal with some ...


2

According to הרב מאיר הלוי הלמן - לבוש הארון (modern English sefer on Techeiles), on page 21: The color of murex dye was commonly known as “Tyrian Purple”, as the city of Tyre (today in Lebanon) was the leading center for purple dye production. Murex dye had “great brilliance and fastness in comparison with other known dye”. These qualities, as well ...


2

Herod did not build a new temple. The second Temple was standing when he came into power, and Herod did a major renovation on the existing second Temple. He upgraded and beautified the structure, while not moving it at all and leaving the Temple intact. Because of the magnificence of the renovation, the post-renovation second Temple is sometimes called "...


2

R. David Tzvi Hoffman in his commentary to Deuteronomy 3:11 gives a large size for Og based on the bedstead described there. However, he then quotes the opinion of Jean Leclerc (?) that Og deliberately had a bedstead that was larger than necessary, in order for people to think that he was bigger than he really was. R. Hoffman then says that one who finds it ...


2

Here are 3 books not already mentioned which are highly relevant and which I appreciated Gerald Schroeder: The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific and Biblical Wisdom (2009) which "demonstrates the surprising parallels between a variety of Biblical teachings and the findings of biochemists, paleontologists, astrophysicists, and quantum physicists. ...


1

According to Ohr Somayach the Exodus took place in the Jewish year 2448 corresponding to 1312 BCE. Ohr Somayach mentions “Thutmose III?” as the King.


1

Dr. Yehoshua Brand has an essay where he explores the original length(s) of the 'amah' measurement based on critical analyses of Rabbinic texts and archaeological findings (Klei Zchuchit BeSifrut HaTalmud 221ff.).


1

Some fair comments on my last answer were added, so I'll try to improve it. "Are they really egyptian paintings of the exodus?" It's possible, I don't know. It's also possible they are not, I also don't know. Here I can't help. "Are there good reasons to think they're not?" Yes, there are good reasons to think they are not. This is what we call a possible ...


1

Herod was known as a tremendous builder or renovator. According to many, this was trying to compensate for his own doubts about the validity of his monarchy. See this link: http://www.biblearchaeology.org/post/2009/12/08/The-Slaughter-of-the-Innocents-Historical-Fact-or-Legendary-Fiction.aspx He renovated and extended the second Temple. He didn't build it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible