9

R' Dovid Feinstein rules that chalav stam in the US is permissible me'ikar hadin year-round, so it is not comparable to pas palter and one need not be strict to the same degree of pas palter. However, he does maintain that chalav Yisrael is ideal, so it seems like he might consider it a reasonable optional practice to undertake during the aseres y'mei t'...


5

The Igros Moshe (YD 2:33) writes that the common custom is to consume pas palter even where pas yisrael is easily available.


4

Generally speaking, if the whole process is done only by non-Jewish workers, then this is exactly "bread of a Jew that a non-Jew baked", and it is forbidden. There's however an answer by Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (YD 1:45) who says that if there's no other way, it should be allowed (such as a Jew's factory, where the Jew needs the non-Jewish workers and cannot ...


3

The piece you're quoting says with regards to aseres yemei teshuva. The Shulchan Aruch writes that those are lenient concerning pas paltar year-round should be strict during the Ten Days of Repentance. That's what Rabbi Dovid Feinstein was addressing. There has been a clear halachic preference against pas paltar -- but room for leniency as well -- on the ...


3

To be bread it must have toar lechem, "the appearance of bread". So noodles are definitely out, as are cooked grains, which do not even necessarily require bishul yisrael (to be cooked by a Jew), but batter-based cakes etc. are in. Beyond that things get hard to pin down, and I have not seen any responsa on the subject. Rav Yitzchok Berkovits says they ...


3

The Beis Yosef in O.C. 603 quotes a Tashbet"z quoting R' Shmuel of Burnburk that one shouldn't accept not to eat pas palter during aseres yemei teshuva because if he did he'd have to continue keeping it all year. We don't pasken like that which is where the Aruch HaShulchan is coming from. That being the case I think it's clear from the poskim the way they ...


3

Fortune cookies are made from a batter and baked very thin, so that they can be folded around the paper fortune. (And, I always assumed that the fortune was mixed into the cookie batter!) You can see here a video of how they are made. According to this OU site: The Magen Avrohom (s.k. 40) agrees that if a baked item is made from a liquid batter and is ...


2

I would suggest reaching out to the kosher certifying company. Some of them. The frozen bread products: As of last I checked (December 2017) unless it says they are, they are not. They are not on the KVH pas yisroel list http://kvhkosher.org/certified-pas-yisroel-list-5778/. The ones certified by the chof-k state next to the hechsher that they are pas ...


2

Aruch Hashulchan (603) says: …so he wrote that even someone who is not careful all year with bread of a non-Jew should be careful during the ten days of return, q.v. It seems to me that that's true only of things that have no legal prohibition — like this, which is only a pretty thing to do (hidur), so it's appropriate to prettify thusly ...


2

This would depend on whether or not someone would make hamotzi if eating a meal's worth of breakfast cereal. To paraphrase from http://www.halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Pat_Akum: Breakfast cereals which are Mezonos would be subject to Pas Akum only if they have tzuras hapas, because otherwise one would never make Hamotzi on them (Rama O.C. 168:13, ...


2

Rav Herschel Shechter of YU every year reiterates that cereals are not bread but a cooked food. If Cheerios aren't bishul akum the rest of the year, they aren't bishul akum in the days of repentance.


2

Grain products need "tzuras hapas" to qualify for the takanah of pas yisrael Cereal doesn't have "tzuras hapas" - it doesn't look like a baked food (like bread, pretzels, or bagels.) Likewise, most poskim write that Bran Flakes do not have tzuras hapas; the same would apply to Cheerios. The Source of the above quote also quotes Rashi on Menachot 75b ...


1

In commercial cereal production today, the actual cooking process is usually done through rotary steaming, not baking. After the fully cooked grain or corn is crimped, shredded and cut, it is then passed through a toasting machine, which uses lower heat than in baking to remove moisture after the cooking has already been completed. It is a finishing process,...


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