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24

the question is more cultural than religious. The notion of mayo and white bread plays to the stereotype of the WASPish cuisine as opposed to the traditional eastern-european influenced foods which would have one expect traditional deli fare of pastrami on rye with mustard and maybe a pickle. the issue of dietary law is not at play here.


14

From what I can tell, either way you accent this word is probably fine. My understanding, based on Biblical grammar My understanding is that the accent in this case goes on the 'mo' syllable1, due to the rule of "nasog achor." This rule says that when multi-syllabic Word A is followed (without disjunctive cantillation) by Word B, and Word B has an ...


13

This is the interpretation of the Shem Mishmuel on the Parsha (5671). His reasoning is that the three 'blessings' of Sarah's tent correspond to three miracles that occurred in the Mishkan, the third of which was that the showbread remained fresh for the entire week. Therefore, he says that the 'blessing in the dough' means the same thing.


12

2 Samuel 15:12 "And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David's counsellor, from his city, from Giloh, as he offered the sacrifices. And the conspiracy was strong, and the people with Absalom were steadily increasing." The "friend" who betrays King David, that is mentioned in Psalms 41:10 (41:9 in Christian Bibles), and Psalms 55:...


10

The Ha'amek Davar offers two explanations: His first answer is that a there was a constant miracle that the bread always stayed fresh for the week between its baking and its consumption. Similarly, the original bread miraculously stayed fresh for many months. His preferred answer is that the original bread was made by Betzalel just to demonstrate what it ...


9

A straightforward answer is provided by the Meiri (Beis HaB'chira, B'rachos 35a) and echoed by the Shita M'kubeztes (Brachos 35a), who write that the phrasing for each is based on verses pertaining to each (as mentioned in Michoel's answer and in Shalom's answer). Further, the Meiri indicates that borei p'ri ha'adama would also be suitable for bread, ...


9

There seems to be no known source for feeding the fish at Tashlich. As already noted, those who mention it then to be opposed to it. But the fact is that it is mentioned - and its origins seem to be almost as old as the Minhag of Tashlich. Regarding feeding the fish at Tashlich we could learn from the Aruch HaShulchan's opinion regarding feeding the birds ...


8

The Bach in O.C. Siman 167 has a nice explanation of this. He starts by pointing out that the word "hamotzi" is the preferred word for the blessing, even though the word "motzi" would suffice, because "hamotzi" implies both past and future tense (Berachos 38a). The intent, he says, is both on this bread which came out of the ground, and on the bread that ...


7

The Shita Mekubetzes to Brochos 35a ask this, and explains that the choice of wording for the two blessings is in accordance with phrases found previously in Tanach - the blessing for bread is based on the verse (Tehillim 104:14) "להוציא לחם מן הארץ", whereas the blessing for vegetables comes from the verse (Devarim 26:2) "מראשית כל פרי האדמה".


7

This question is discussed in Chevel Nachalato 8:13, where a number of contemporary Rabbis' approaches are presented. R. Avigdor Nebenzahl writes that he knows of no good answer to the question, but does note some hints to the shtei halechem, such as Chabad's text of ושני שעירים לכפר as part of musaf. R. Ya'akov Epstein suggests that there is a hesitance ...


6

One who has a bandage on his hand which is not easily removable should wash as much of his hand as possible (even if that amount zero) and take care that any skin which could not be washed not directly touch the bread. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 162:10, Magen Avraham sk 18, Mishna Brurah sk 68 and particularly 69 It would seem that the appropriate blessing ...


6

I checked through the Nitei Gavriel on Nisuin and there is no mention of such a Minhag. I personally have also never heard or seen such a custom. The closest I found is the Rokeach 353 who mentions that after the Brachos of the Chuppa they give the Chassan and Kallah honey and cheese to eat based on the verse (Shir Hashirim 4:11) "Devash Vchalav Tachas ...


5

Tif'eret Yosef OC 14 asks your specific question, concluding that the "bread" would be considered pat habaah bikisanin and not get a hamotzi under ordinary circumstances. (I do not expect this ruling is universally agreed upon. Compare, for instance, his reasoning to Aruch haShulchan OC 158:6 and note the ill-defined boundary in Mishna Berura 168 sk 33. See ...


5

If it is Kosher pastrami and Kosher bread and Kosher mayonnaise there is nothing wrong. It is 100% permissible for one who keeps Kosher to eat.


5

Proper procedure? I don't think there is a preference. Hamotzi does not exempt wine ever (Shulchan Aruch OC 174:1) and if you drank wine before the bread it continues to exempt wine drunk after the bread (:4). Also, the after blessing on the bread exempts the wine, even if wine was only drunk before the bread, and certainly if it was drunk during the meal ...


5

There's an entire chapter of Shulchan Aruch (Yore Dea 112) — sixteen subsections plus all the commentaries and later works — devoted to this, so obviously answers here, including this one, can't do the topic justice. But the Star-K and the OU summarize the main points, qq.v., and I'll briefly summarize the summaries: It's forbidden unless a Jew ...


5

This is subject to a dispute among modern day poskim if the faucet has a din of a kli. Rav Elyashiv and Rav Ovadia Yosef both held it did have a din of a kli; thus, if no cup is available, one can turn the faucet on and off twice (or three if Sephardic) on each hand, since turning on the faucet is considered "koach gavra". This is not to be relied upon ...


5

In the seffer haminhagim of the Maharil, the source of tashlich quoted in the Ramma end of siman 583, he mentions in hilchos Rosh Hashana ois 9 when going to tashlich on Rosh Hashana to be carefull not to take food along so as not to feed the fish, which people would do for fun while they were there. It has been proposed that this seemingly innocent act of ...


5

This is not permitted because one of the restrictions of Pesach is that you are not allowed to derive any benefit from Chametz. See http://www.kosherquest.org/aboutpesach.php


5

In Psalms 104.14 it is written "Lehotzi lechem min ha'aretz" צְמִיחַ חָצִיר, לַבְּהֵמָה, וְעֵשֶׂב, לַעֲבֹדַת הָאָדָם; לְהוֹצִיא לֶחֶם, מִן-הָאָרֶץ. I have always assumed that this was the source of the text, and a shiur from Rav Ya'akov Nagan from Yeshivat Othniel also gives this source.


5

A similar concept is used today, in which a variety of symbols are used from various Rabbinical organizations to mark kosher food (bread included). Read more about hechsherim (singular: hechsher) here.


4

http://jcarrot.org/whats-so-jewish-about-bagels There is more than one answer to this question, the most popular attributing the creation of bagels to a Jewish baker living in 1683 Vienna. According to folklore, this unnamed man invented the bagel as a tribute to King John III Sobieski of Poland.


4

According to this (which includes footnotes to the original sources) the bracha is Mezonot. There are two main instances where the bracha on bread is Mezonot: when small pieces of bread are mixed with other ingredients, to the p[o]int that they are no longer recognizable as bread when small pieces of bread are cooked When bread is 1) broken into pieces ...


4

There is a requirement to eat bread for first two meals of Shabbos, as per the Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim Siman 274:4. However, the Mishna Berura Siman 291:1 Sif Katan 3 notes that Shabbos meals were given for oneg meaning pleasure, not for tzar meaning pain or unpleasantness. The sefer Shemiras Shabbos K'Hilchasa therefore rules in chapter 54 paragraph 35 ...


4

According to this article by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Rav Soloveitchik explained the special nature of bread as relating to the degree of human involvement required to turn G-d's creation (stalks of wheat) into edible bread. Rav Soloveitchik explained as follows: Concerning the Seven Species, the partnership between G-d and humans is limited, with the ...


4

The laws of breaking bread are in O Ch 167 and with the exception of starting the cut are no different as mentioned there between Shabbos and weekday. See the same question asked at Ohr Someach. The use of salt is mentioned in Seif 5 where the expression מלח או לפתן ‏ is used לפתן being something eaten with bread. There are situations in which salt may not ...


4

See: http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/washing-hands-on-go.html One can dip one’s hands into a body of water that would otherwise be suitable as a mikvah. One may wash with other liquids, if necessary, though without a Bracha. (Shulchan Aruch 160:12) While disposable cups are not ideal, one can use them if that’s all one has. Likewise, one may use ...


4

As long as the wheat flour is not used only as a binder (and it probably is not) then the bracha is hamotzi. I deduce this from a similar question asked on the Berachot site: Q20) If I have a bread that the baker made for me special with 3 grains (meals) in the same quantities: oat, rice and buckwheat. What would the beracha rishona and achrona be on ...


4

Challah in chutz la'aretz may be taken after (most of) the bread has been eaten, since it is only mid'rabonon (Shulchan Aruch YD 323:1). However, one must leave over a little more than the shiur challah which he will separate, in order that there should be something leftover from which to separate it (Rema ibid). Why is there no problem that the taste of ...


4

Neither the question, nor the seven answers so far, mention what is probably the most relevant Talmudic passage to this issue. The Talmud, in discussing the blessing for olive oil, states the following (with the key line bolded): Berachot 35b חוץ מן היין וכו': מאי שנא יין אילימא משום דאשתני לעלויא אשתני לברכה והרי שמן דאשתני לעלויא ולא אשתני לברכה דאמר ...


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