15

Kesubos 72a תניא נמי הכי המדיר את אשתו שלא תשאל ושלא תשאיל נפה וכברה ריחים ותנור יוציא ויתן כתובה מפני שמשיאה שם רע בשכינותיה Someone who imposes a vow on his wife that she may not borrow or lend her kitchen utensils like sieve, mill, oven etc. must divorce his wife and pay her Kesuba because he makes a bad name for his wife among her neighbours


7

Excellent question. Back in an agricultural society, people had animals around. So he was thinking it would be a cow, sheep, or goat. Nonetheless, the Talmud said he should not have taken that oath -- what if it was a horse or donkey? (Which can't be used as a sacrifice.) Some Christians took this story as a message "oh, always fulfill your oaths." The ...


7

I finally found the Sefer Lulei Toratcha stories with Rav Shach on the parsha.Parshas Matos 30:4. Rav Shach answered that she should name the child Shmayah since it is similar to the name Shimon and in this way she can be miskayim the neder a little bit.


6

Halichos Shlomo 1 1:7 says that a lady who gets married to someone who holds that it is required to wait 3 hours after eating meat before eating dairy, and until now she always held 6 hours, may change her Minhag to her husbands and is not required to do Hataras Nedarim.


6

The barebone Halacha is in Yoreh De'ah 228 - סימן רכח - דיני התרת נדרים - where it says that all that the 3 people need to say is מֻתָּר לָךְ - preferably thrice. So I'm not sure what the others were saying but as long as they said מֻתָּר לָךְ (or similar, in any language) even once, the hataras nedarim is valid. My guess: They either say it often and ...


6

I found the source I was looking for ,it is from the Chofetz Chaim in his Kuntres Tiferes Adam (on the issur of shaving ). He writes that he remembers that when a Jew took a vow he would do so with his beard and payos.


6

yeshiva.co was posed this question ("Hatarat Nedarim & Kol Nidrei") and responded: 1) The most common answer [...] is that Kol Nidrei refers to the vows of the community, while Hatarat Nedarim takes care of personal vows. 2) On another level, Kol Nidrei (according to one Nusach) frees us from future vows only if the condition is forgotten ...


5

By making the neder to bring a mincha with barley when he knows it is not possible, this person is making a neder in vain – a neder shov. From INSIGHTS INTO THE DAILY DAF Nedarim 15 I see that The RAN (end of Nedarim 14b) writes that there is no Isur of "Neder Shav," a Neder made in vain, as there is an Isur of Shevu'as Shav, a Shevu'ah made in ...


5

At face value, it would seem that the mitzvah of arachin is ‘powered’, so to speak, by nedarim. It is a pledge to pay one’s ‘eirech’ value, not unlike the neder one can make to donate one’s ‘damim’ value, i.e. his worth as a slave, to hekdesh. Despite their similarities, however, there is a fundamental difference. The Chazon Ish, in his introduction to ...


5

Your example is politically loaded. Let's try a simpler one. Joe makes a vow not to eat chocolate. Then he finds himself on a desert island where there is no food other than chocolate, and he will otherwise die of starvation. (Or more simply -- he's having a diabetic emergency and the only available food is chocolate.) The prohibition of violating a vow is ...


5

The Shulchan Arukh in the laws of Nedarim (YD 210:1) rules that if one intended to prohibit wheat bread to himself as a Neder but only said "bread" unmodified, only wheat bread is prohibited to him. (The Shakh there rules this is only so if the omission of the type of bread was an accident, and one cannot rely on this rule Lechatchila.) Your case ("i will ...


5

It appears indeed one should keep his promises in the context of a small gift. The Rambam writes (MT Mechira 7:9) (based on the gemara in Baba Metzia 49a) Similarly, if a person promised to give a colleague a gift and failed to do so, he is considered to be faithless. When does the above apply? With regard to a small gift, because the recipient will ...


4

On a peshat level, Yiftach (see Shofetim 11) was not exactly the most educated or refined of individuals. 1) He was the son of a harlot (pasuk 1) 2) He was a gang leader of a group of no-goodniks (pasuk 3) who was only brought back and promoted because a tough guy was needed (pasuk 8). 3) He is not theologically sophisticated, and in speaking to the king ...


4

Tallis -- this is easy. The halachic default is that everyone 13 and up should be wearing a Tallis; Ashkenazi never-married-men happen to have a custom otherwise. (Rabbi Meiselman, for instance, feels this whole custom is in error and his unmarried sons wear tallisos.) In absence of such a custom, we default to the standard -- wear a Tallis. Hair covering --...


4

Rashi to the cited verse: לא יחיה: ומאותה קללה מתה רחל בדרך Shall not live: and from that curse Rachel died on the road. So it seems that it was a curse.


4

There is nothing special going on here based on the marriage relationship. Anyone can say to anyone else: "Do you swear XYZ?" and if they answer affirmatively, the oath is binding on them. So too if a husband says to his wife "Do you swear to not talk to Ploni-down-the-street?" The relevant rule in this case is that breaking that specific oath is considered ...


4

It depends on the circumstances. Obviously, n'darim in general are a matter of biblical law: they're mentioned in the Tora. Yad, N'darim 1:4. On the other hand, some rules were established by the rabbis as safeguards against violating biblical laws of n'darim. Ibid., :27.


4

Yes In Shulchan Aruch YD 214 is stated that אבל הנוהגים איסור בדברים המותרים מחמת שסוברים שהם אסורים לא הוי כאילו קבלום בנדר ‏ If someone was acustomed to prohibiting something that is permitted by mistake, it is not as it he accepted a neder upon himself. For hatarat nedarim if someone want to stop a minhag (when he was regarding it for himself as a duty,...


4

I believe answers your questions are all found in the Metzudos David. The first thing to note is that based on the explanation of the the commentary. It is to be noted that he is of the opinion that Jepthah did not bring his daughter as an offering in the traditional sense and rather is of the opinion that he did not allow her to be married to another man ([...


4

Source: http://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Hatarat_Nedarim Rabbi Akiva Eiger (comments on Shulchan Aruch YD 228:1) who writes that while relatives can serve as a Bet Din for Hatarat Nedarim, a woman can't serve on such a Bet Din.


4

The OP quotes a verse that has Yoseph saying: "When G-d comes to you..." Yosef planned on being buried in Egypt. He simply wanted to leave when everyone else did. By that time, his brothers had already passed away and were themselves taken out of Egypt by the B'nei Yisroel.


4

As I explain in Vayigash - Why didn't the family go back?, Par'o only allowed Yosef to bury Yaakov in Eretz Yisrael because of the oath Yaakov had made him swear. Even then, he forced the brothers to leave the families behind as hostages. Once Yosef died, the brothers could no longer leave Mitzraim. Thus, they were unable to even take Yosef out for ...


4

From Halachipedia The practice of Talmidei Chachamim is to tell their daughters prior to Kiddushin that all Nedarim they have taken are hereby revoked.[20] In fact, Rav Moshe Shternbuch advises even nowadays this should be practiced prior to one's daughter becoming a bogeret and that she should be informed, because a father who compliments his ...


4

Midrash Bereshis Rabba 60,3 says clearly that Yiftach's daughter did not need to comply as Yiftach's neder was not valid to bring his daughter as a sacrifice and therefore according to Reish Lakish Yiftach also was scot-free, and according to Rabbi Yochanan even though she wasn't a Korban at all and was free, He was obligated to bring her value in money just ...


3

The Shela in the beginning of Mesechtas Yoma - paragraph beginning with וכך הוא המנהג mentions saying דיינים מומחים in the context of saying it in front of a group of Talmidei Chochomim (wise scholars) and Yirei Shomayim (God-fearing people). Orchos Rabeinu 2 page 171 mentions that the Steipler omitted the word "מומחים." However, Rabbi Shlomo Kluger ...


3

I hereby nullify any expression of intent or condition or disclaimer, and disclaimers that result from my disclaimers (lit. that come out from within) ad infinatum, and invalidate any witnesses of my disclaimer against the vow that I am about to make. It is a declaration discounting any attempt to invalidate a vow, in order to make the vow absolutely ...


3

The Beis Yosef in O.C. 603 quotes a Tashbet"z quoting R' Shmuel of Burnburk that one shouldn't accept not to eat pas palter during aseres yemei teshuva because if he did he'd have to continue keeping it all year. We don't pasken like that which is where the Aruch HaShulchan is coming from. That being the case I think it's clear from the poskim the way they ...


3

You can give Tzedakah with Maaser money, as long you don't have an obligation to give that Tzedakah. Example: Someone got an Aliya. The cost of the Aliya was $180. He is not permited to deduct it from Maaser, but he can be Menadev (pledge) $180 from his Maaser when he has an aliya. You can read this and this for more info.


3

The relevant date is the date when he hears who vowed and what they vowed. (Rambam Nedarim 12:21, Shulchan Arukh YD 234:21,31-32)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible