11

These eggs are cooked by boilers that run constantly. The OU ensures that when the boiler needs to be restarted, it is done with a Mashgiach. Source: I heard it from a Rabbi who asked the OU and got that answer. Of course we may not be talking about the same company, but the point being that the OU requires the Bishul Yisroel and makes arrangements for it. ...


10

The OU uses a system where they remotely light an oven in order for the product to be Bishul Yisrael. From the OU website Rabbi Yehuda Shain has recently developed an ingenious system whereby the mashgiach can monitor the production from an off-site location. By installing a special device, it is possible to turn the oven on and off through the use ...


8

שולחן ערוך יורה דעה הלכות תערובות סימן קיג:טז ‏כלים שבשל בהם העובד כוכבים לפנינו דברים שיש בהם משום בישולי עובדי כוכבים, צריכים הכשר. ויש אומרים שאינם צריכים. ואף לדברי המצריכים הכשר, אם הוא כלי חרס מגעילו שלש פעמים, ודיו, מפני שאין לאיסור זה עיקר מדאורייתא.‏ My rough translation: Dishes that a non-Jew cooked food with (in our ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 113:16) quotes two opinions on the matter, but his language (סתם ויש אומרים הלכה כסתם) seems to indicate that he sides the first opinion, namely that the vessels do require kashering. However, he notes that since Bishul Akum is a rabbinic prohibition, we allow you to kasher some things that you normally could not kasher, such as ...


6

In Igros Moshe yoreh deah 4 siman 48 ois 5 he says potato chips should be bishul yisroel, because it is not so clear that they don't need to be. He also adds that "it is like many foods made in factories that people say reasons to be lenient and most people are lenient and with this issur dirabanan one cannot chastise the people who are lenient." The ...


6

In general there is no prohibition of bishul akum with water since its form and taste do not change through cooking. Star-K for instance writes Foods whose form and taste do not change through cooking. This applies even to food that would normally not be eaten without cooking (e.g. pasteurized milk or distilled water). However, if all people would ...


5

There's an entire chapter of Shulchan Aruch (Yore Dea 112) — sixteen subsections plus all the commentaries and later works — devoted to this, so obviously answers here, including this one, can't do the topic justice. But the Star-K and the OU summarize the main points, qq.v., and I'll briefly summarize the summaries: It's forbidden unless a Jew ...


5

Halachically Speaking (7:2) has a great overview of this question: There is a discussion in the poskim regarding the status of a Jew who is not observant. The Rambam states that a Jew who is mechalel Shabbos (openly) is considered like a non-Jew for all mitzvos. The Pischei Teshuva debates the status of a mechalel Shabbos (mumar) in regard to bishul akum,...


4

To my understanding, the food which would be subject to the concern of bishul akum must be of a level of "importance" that it would be served "at the table of a king" (oleh al shulchan malachim). For example, this site says that hummus would not qualify. This site from the Star-K quantifies it as "Any food that would not be served at a wedding feast ...


4

This is the response I received to my query from the OU. Dear Gershon, Thank you for contacting the OU. They are bishul yisroel. Please do not hesitate to contact us again should you have any further questions. Sincerely, The Web(be) Rebbe Orthodox Union Kashruth Division So there is no Bishul Akum Heter being used with supervised hard ...


4

This is from the crcweb questions to Rav Belsky: Remote Lighting & Timers Submitted by: Rabbi Eli Gersten Some factories are located in remote areas and it is difficult for Mashgichim to visit frequently or on short notice. If such a factory requires bishul Yisroel, it may be impossible to send a Mashgiach every time the boiler ...


4

Kashrus is a business where the certifier has to balance between the companies and consumers. The certifier determines whether consumers are looking for a higher or lower standard relative to the income they make from the certified company. Most likely the certifier determined that the loss of certifying this company is less than the gain of consumers that ...


4

As you pointed out from Rabbi Heinemann, it would only apply if this was served at a state dinner, which this was certainly not. According to other Poskim, who take "Oleh al Shulchan Melachim" literally, if we assume that a president has the status of a king, it would now be prohibited. If we assume that a Melech refers only to a king, and not to a ...


3

Without knowing any context or the underlying reasoning behind the policy change, it's difficult to know why the standard was changed. Certainly it is possible that politics and/or customer satisfaction played a role, for better or for worse. It is also quite possible that halachic decisors genuinely changed there view independently. There is no rule that a ...


3

From siff 4 in Orach Chaim 318 we see that there is a problem to cook something which has been salted. Being so, there is a siman in Yoreh Deah which should suffice to answer your question. In siman 113 siff 12 the Mechaber writes: Small fish which were salted ether by a Jew or non-Jew (it wouldn't matter as salting is not subject to bishul akum, Taz #12)...


3

This is what it says in Shulchan Aruch Yore Deah 113:5: If a non-Jew cooks but he did not intend to cook -it's permissible (e.g. he lit a fire in a field to get rid of the grass/hay and Chagavim were cooked -they are permitted).. But if his intention was to cook -it's prohibited (e.g. he lit a fire to bake bread and he didn't have any knowledge that there ...


3

You can ask the OU to confirm, but yes, they have a Jew present constantly when the cheese is being made. They may have some days where the cheese is not Kosher and they have arrangements to have that sold as non-Kosher. Yes, that is expensive. Next to meat, it is the most expensive form of Kosher certification. See here: The supervision provided by ...


3

According to Rabbi Yitzchak Abadi, there is no issue with Maarith Ayin. Here are some quoted examples and responsa. Some of these responsa are from his son A Abadi. Example 1: Questioner: How can you compare a treif restaurant where people go to eat treif to an airplane that serves kosher meals, also the kosher meal is clearly distinct to those who ...


3

I think you're missing the most important issue: The pots been used to cook the food may have recently been used to cook unkosher food - and thus render the food unkosher. While we normally assume that pots are not ben-Yoma (i.e. have not been used in the past 24 hours and hence don't make the food unkosher) in a restaurant that assumption is clearly ...


3

Without intent: As you pointed out in the question, the Shach (10) and Taz (8) both argue with the רמ"א, which is what we would follow. This is true the other way as well, if a non-Jew turned on the fire without intent. Even that case won't be considered Bishul Akum. (חיי הלוי חלק ד' סי' נ"ב אות ג). Intent means "intent to help the cooking with adjusting ...


2

If the stove/oven has a pilot light, then your relative, or another Jew, could extinguish and relight the pilot light, and then the non-Jewish aid could cook without violating bishul akum, if the following leniency is permitted under her circumstances. Of course, you should consult your local Orthodox rabbi. "The Rama cites a very lenient ruling that even ...


2

According to R' Moshe Heinemann, the Star-K's chief authority, the use such remote-control devices does not grant bishul Yisrael status, as it is not sufficiently direct: If the action that is done by the Yehudi (Jew) causes an indirect lighting of the oven, that action would not qualify for bishul Yisroel. Hence, dialing a number that in turn trips a ...


2

Edit: The Rivash at the end of his tshuva #28 mentions a food called זיבליה which is made of flour and honey. He writes that he thinks it is not subject to the prohibition of bishul akum, because the honey is the main ingredient, כי אומרים שהדבש עקר, and that is not subject to the prohibition as it is eaten raw. End edit There is an argument between the ...


2

Practically today, there are enough complications in the process and ingredients (e.g. the release agent on the baking sheets) that you really want a kosher-certifying agency who knows what they're doing to go in and look around the place. There are rumors about what sorts of bread are okay in France -- are they baked at a bread-only boulongerie or a cakes-...


2

“Daily Halachah” by Rabbi Eli Mansour states: The Ben Ish Hai lists a number of common foods that are subject to this prohibition, including rice, truffles and eggs. Even though one could drink an egg yolk without cooking it, nevertheless, since people normally cook eggs, it is included in this prohibition. Thus, one may not allow his non-Jewish ...


2

The late Rabbi Salzer of the Adath Jeshurun community in Johannesburg (paying attention Danny Schoeman?) gave a strange ruling. He paskened that potato chips were bishul akum and he advised members of his kehillah to cover them with ketchup and reheat them in the oven. I never understood this. If the chips were bishul akum then putting them into the oven ...


2

no, because there would be no way to verify such a claim in a non kosher kitchen. We don't rely on the word of non-Jews for koshrus.


2

I just emailed this question to a friend of mine and I received the following response: בפתחי תשובה (יו״ד רסי׳ קיב וסקי״ג) בשם התפלה למשה, ובפרי מגדים (שם סקי״ב בשפ״ד סק״ב) – פסקו לאיסור. וכן בקצור שולחן ערוך (סימן ע״ב ס״ב) סתם ג״כ לאיסור. וראה כה״ח סקי״ב סקי״א וסקי״ג סק״א שבפת״ש לא ראה מש״כ בערך השולחן לאיסור. Pische Teshuva YD 112 in the name of Tefila ...


2

First of all Bishul Akum Food cooked by a gentile applies even if there is no worry of intermarriage Rema Yore Dea 112,1: אסרו חכמים לאכול פת של עובדי כוכבים, משום חתנות. (ואפילו במקום דליכא משום חתנות, אסור) (רשב"א סימן רמ"ח) Secondly, since a Gentile according to Halacha is allowed to marry a sibling who shares a common father but not a common mother ...


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