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In an article I read online: http://www.tosfosinenglish.com/pdf/Shabos/6a7karmlis.pdf I read the following:

כרמל (Karmel) is comprised of two (opposite) terms: רך with the meaning soft and not yet matured (riped), and מלא meaning full and ripe. Together they convey the meaning of כרמל that the grain is neither moist nor dry, but somewhere in between.

הכא נמי כרמלית אינו לא כרשות היחיד ולא כרשות הרבים

Similarly here too by the רשית of a כרמלית is neither like a רה"י nor like a רה"ר but somewhere in between.

Could someone help me to translate these two phrases:

  1. הכא נמי כרמלית אינו לא כרשות היחיד ולא כרשות הרבים

  2. Is neither like a רה"י nor like a רה"ר but somewhere in between

I don't understand them, and I would like to know what the writer is saying here.

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  • perhaps: Somewhat in between, not somewhere
    – kouty
    May 3, 2016 at 10:38
  • 1. Here too, "karmelit" is unlike reshut hayachid (i.e. private domain) and unlike reshut harabim (i.e. public domain). 2. Same as above (using acronyms), unlike either, but somewhere in between the private and public domains.
    – Cauthon
    May 3, 2016 at 10:58
  • Levi, please adjust the term in the title of your question. As it looks right now, the word כרמל connotes a totally different idea and refers to "toasted grains", such as that which is mentioned regarding the Omer offering, that one may not eat "karmel" until the Omer offering has been brought.
    – DanF
    May 3, 2016 at 14:08
  • .......כארמלתא.
    – kouty
    Feb 16, 2020 at 22:37

1 Answer 1

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The gemarah is describing the various types of domains (public domain, private domain, etc). One of them is called a karmelit. A Karmelit is an area which is not completely private but also not completely public - it's somewhere in between.

Tosafot is attempting to explain the word Karmelit by relating it to a similar word. Karmel is grain which is not completely ripe but not completely un-ripe either. So too a Karmelit is a domain which is not completely public and not completely private but rather somewhere in between.

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