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I heard that when one moves into a new house that the first thing he should bring into the house is bread and salt, it's supposed to be a Segulah for something. Does anyone know a source for this ''minhag''?

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    See footnote 4: chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/472142/jewish/… It is an ancient custom, called hachnasat orchim.
    – Shmuel
    Jul 10, 2022 at 16:47
  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread_and_salt "Bread and salt is a welcome greeting ceremony in some Slavic, Nordic, Baltic, Balkan and other European cultures as well as in Middle Eastern cultures"
    – Al Berko
    Jul 12, 2022 at 11:02

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אוצר כל מנהגי ישורון:

מדוע ולמה כשנכנסין לדור בבית מכניסין לתוכו קודם הכניסה לחם ומלח. הטעם שכן מצינו כשרצה הקב"ה להניחהו לאדם הראשון בגן עדן הכין מקודם בגן עדן כל עץ וגו' וטוב למאכל ומלח בכלל אכילה כי היאכל תפל בלי מלח וכן נח כשנכנס אל התיבה הכניס תחלה מכל מיני מאכל

Why and for what when living in a new home do we first bring bread and salt into it? The reason is that we see that when God wanted to place Adam within Eden that he first prepared for him within it every tree, etc. and all that is good to it, and salt is because of the food, for the food has no flavor without it, and also Noah when he entered the ark he first brought in all types of food.

נוהג בחכמה:

מנהג כשנוסעים לדור בבית מכניסים לתוכו קמח ושמן זית. ויש טעם לדבר, כשרצה הקב"ה להניח לאדם הראשון הכין לו מקודם כל עץ נחמד למראה וטוב למאכל. וכן נח כשנכנס לתיבה הכניס תחילה מכל מיני מאכל, כן עושים ג"כ לסימן שאל יחסר לנו בבית הזה.

There is a custom to bring flour and olive oil when going to live in a new home. And there is a reason for this, when God wanted to place Adam within Eden that he first prepared for him within it every tree, etc. and all that is good to it, and also Noah when he entered the ark he first brought in all types of food, and this is also done to symbolize [the aspiration] that the home never be lacking

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  • Nice try, +1, about the source - just an attempt to posteriourly justify a goyish tradition.
    – Al Berko
    Jul 12, 2022 at 11:06
  • @AlBerko many customs/practices may very well have a gentile origin. I do not know if this is one such occasion, you may well be right. Either way, the OP is seeking Jewish sources that discuss this practice, which is all that I've provided. They're not my words, nor are they a personal endorsement. Jul 12, 2022 at 22:40
  • You did a good job, and that's why I upvoted your answer. I also tried to warn the OP not to see the sources as the sources of the tradition.
    – Al Berko
    Jul 13, 2022 at 12:22

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