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(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priestscohanim (priests) to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labour of ofPreventing non-cohanim accessing the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?


Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyoneany alien who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labour of of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?


Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as cohanim (priests) to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). Preventing non-cohanim accessing the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?


Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that any alien who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

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source | link

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial laborlabour of of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?

 

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labor of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labour of of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?

 

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

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source | link

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labor of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labor of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle for ritual purposes?

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

(Note: I am posting this more specific follow-up to a previous question based on the recommendation of Isaac Moses here.)

Aaron and his descendants were designated as priests to do the ritual service in the Tabernacle (Exodus 28:1). The more menial labor of the Tabernacle was assigned to the rest of the tribe of Levi (Numbers 1:47-53).

Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the Tabernacle or the Beth Hamikdash for ritual purposes?

Some relevant passages:

Leviticus 1 and subsequent chapters describe the procedures for making various offerings.

In general, a person offering an animal was to bring it to the door of the Tent of Meeting. This seems to mean the entrance to the Holy Place, suggesting that the the person making the offering was to bring it inside the courtyard, but outside of (in front of) the curtain or screen (the מָסָךְ, Exodus 26:36) separating the Holy Place from the courtyard (see related question here).

Also, the descriptions of some of the sacrifices seem to include the person who brings the animal slaughtering it by the altar of burnt offering, which was inside the courtyard. See, for example, Leviticus 1:11.

However, after the events described in Numbers 17, the people say that anyone who comes near to the Tabernacle will die (Numbers 17:27-28). In the aftermath, Numbers 18:22-23 states:

And henceforth the children of Israel shall not come nigh the tent of meeting, lest they bear sin, and die. But the Levites alone shall do the service of the tent of meeting, and they shall bear their iniquity; it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations, and among the children of Israel they shall have no inheritance.

Did this forbid people of other tribes entry only to the Holy Place (and of course to the Holy of Holies), or did it also forbid them entrance to the courtyard? Did people who were not priests or Levites enter the courtyard of the Tabernacle to perform the rituals prescribed in Leviticus and elsewhere in the Torah, and in the Tanakh generally?

I prefer answers based on references to the Tanakh, but also welcome references to ancient or modern Jewish literature and commentary bearing on this question.

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