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According to the company website:

Lotus Biscoff Products are not Kosher certified.

From Kosher.com:

Note: Biscoff brand products, including Lotus Cookies, that are made in Belgium and are imported and sold in the US and Europe do not have a hechsher (kosher certification). Biscoff brand products that are produced for Israeli distribution are kosher and do have a hechsher in many kosher food stores around the world as an import from Israel. Please check products carefully for kosher certification before purchase.

The ingredients panel lists only:

Wheat Flour, Sugar, Vegetable Oils (contains one or more of soy bean oil, sunflower oil, palm oil), Brown Sugar, Leavening (sodium bicarbonate), Soy Flour, Salt, Spice (cinnamon)

What would/could be the concern with uncertified packages? What might the kosher-certifying agency be doing different in the "kosher runs" of the cookie?

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    What could be the concern, and What might they be doing, are very different questions from What is the concern, and What do they do. You ask the former in your post. I'm just checking that that's what you really mean to ask. (You may get answers like "the uncertified ones are chadash" or "the uncertified ones have sodium bicarbonate extracted from pork".) – msh210 Apr 29 '18 at 17:22
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    Just please don't put these in your cholent :-) – Joel K Apr 29 '18 at 17:40
  • @msh210 I'm hoping for an informed and inclusive answer (ideally that presents authoritative sources that the porcine bicarbonate is of course less of a concern than the spring wheat;) – Loewian Apr 29 '18 at 18:47
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