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The elegy "אש תוקד בקרבי", in the 9 Av liturgy, contrasts our exodus from Egypt after enslavement there with our exile from Jerusalem with the Temple's destruction. It comprises 23 couplets, each of which presents a contrast of similar ideas. Sometimes the contrast is literal, as in the fifteenth stanza:

We would wage war and God was there in my exodus from Egypt.
He was far from us and, lo, he is absent, in my exile from Jerusalem.

Other times it's allegorical, as in the fourth stanza:

The sea waves rose and stood like a wall in my exodus from Egypt.
The deliberately evil ones flooded and poured over my head in my exile from Jerusalem.

One stanza, though, doesn't seem to be a contrast of similars. The eighteenth stanza reads:

פארי מגבעות לכבוד נקבעות בצאתי ממצרים.‏
שריקות ותרועות וקולות וזועות בצאתי מירושלים.‏

The splendor of hats, set for honor, in my exodus from Egypt.
Whistles, trumpet blasts, sounds, and tremblings in my exile from Jerusalem.

(The מגבעות, hats, referred to are presumably the כהנים'skohanim's.)

What's the contrast here? How do glorious hats contrast with terrifying sounds?

The elegy "אש תוקד בקרבי" contrasts our exodus from Egypt after enslavement there with our exile from Jerusalem with the Temple's destruction. It comprises 23 couplets, each of which presents a contrast of similar ideas. Sometimes the contrast is literal, as in the fifteenth stanza:

We would wage war and God was there in my exodus from Egypt.
He was far from us and, lo, he is absent, in my exile from Jerusalem.

Other times it's allegorical, as in the fourth stanza:

The sea waves rose and stood like a wall in my exodus from Egypt.
The deliberately evil ones flooded and poured over my head in my exile from Jerusalem.

One stanza, though, doesn't seem to be a contrast of similars. The eighteenth stanza reads:

The splendor of hats, set for honor, in my exodus from Egypt.
Whistles, trumpet blasts, sounds, and tremblings in my exile from Jerusalem.

(The hats referred to are presumably the כהנים's.)

What's the contrast here? How do glorious hats contrast with terrifying sounds?

The elegy "אש תוקד בקרבי", in the 9 Av liturgy, contrasts our exodus from Egypt after enslavement there with our exile from Jerusalem with the Temple's destruction. It comprises 23 couplets, each of which presents a contrast of similar ideas. Sometimes the contrast is literal, as in the fifteenth stanza:

We would wage war and God was there in my exodus from Egypt.
He was far from us and, lo, he is absent, in my exile from Jerusalem.

Other times it's allegorical, as in the fourth stanza:

The sea waves rose and stood like a wall in my exodus from Egypt.
The deliberately evil ones flooded and poured over my head in my exile from Jerusalem.

One stanza, though, doesn't seem to be a contrast of similars. The eighteenth stanza reads:

פארי מגבעות לכבוד נקבעות בצאתי ממצרים.‏
שריקות ותרועות וקולות וזועות בצאתי מירושלים.‏

The splendor of hats, set for honor, in my exodus from Egypt.
Whistles, trumpet blasts, sounds, and tremblings in my exile from Jerusalem.

(The מגבעות, hats, referred to are presumably the kohanim's.)

What's the contrast here? How do glorious hats contrast with terrifying sounds?

1
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How do hats contrast with sounds?

The elegy "אש תוקד בקרבי" contrasts our exodus from Egypt after enslavement there with our exile from Jerusalem with the Temple's destruction. It comprises 23 couplets, each of which presents a contrast of similar ideas. Sometimes the contrast is literal, as in the fifteenth stanza:

We would wage war and God was there in my exodus from Egypt.
He was far from us and, lo, he is absent, in my exile from Jerusalem.

Other times it's allegorical, as in the fourth stanza:

The sea waves rose and stood like a wall in my exodus from Egypt.
The deliberately evil ones flooded and poured over my head in my exile from Jerusalem.

One stanza, though, doesn't seem to be a contrast of similars. The eighteenth stanza reads:

The splendor of hats, set for honor, in my exodus from Egypt.
Whistles, trumpet blasts, sounds, and tremblings in my exile from Jerusalem.

(The hats referred to are presumably the כהנים's.)

What's the contrast here? How do glorious hats contrast with terrifying sounds?