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19

On that gemara, artscroll notes Although on the surface this verse discusses the Babylonian exile, which ended long before the time of Rav Yehudah and R Abba, Rav Yehudah understood it as referring to the Jewish people throughout all their various exiles, and as containing a commandment for them to remain in the Diaspora until God gathers them ...


17

Just to clarify the terms: we wouldn't be talking about Herzl's Zionist movement, since that was founded only in 1897, nine years after R. Hirsch's passing. The reference would be to the various "proto-Zionist" groups and ideologies of his time. (As YDK noted, a lot of the leaders of those movements were indeed secular Jews, although it is only fair to note ...


15

The Satmar book, The Rebbe, mentions a different version of that story. The Rebbe is quoted as saying: Had Humphrey spoken to me in support of the Zionist state, it wouldn't have bothered me in the least. We Jews have a Torah which forbids us to have a state during the exile, and therefore we may not ask the Americans to support the state. But a non-...


10

Interesting question and it is true that artscroll's biography of R Moshe Feinstein doesn't address the question explicitly. Here are a few relevant statements showing R Moshe's position. From the statements below I perceive a "positive-neutral attitude", for sure without any virulence against the State but also not proactively recommending alyah. One ...


9

Firstly, the צמח דוד, referred to in another answer, was actually first printed in 1592. Secondly, the first source I've found is מכילתא דרבי ישמעאל; the term can also be found in סמ"ג, in ספר חסידים, in Maharsha, and in numerous other seforim. On the other hand, the incidence of this term is not particularly frequent. If we replace 'Zionism' with 'Modern ...


9

Need to provide sources, but on one foot, I think the best way to describe his position was: "a convenient distance." Zionism wasn't Rav Moshe's raison d'etre; neither was anti-Zionism. When you're thousands of miles away, that's a position you can afford to have. Just for perspective, consider the pragmatic view of his senior peer, R' Yosef Eliyahu Henkin. ...


8

This question is far too broad to answer here but the essence of what they follow is based upon the teachings of Rabbi Yoel Teitelbaum. There are two primary sources that lay out their approach. The first is קונטרס על הגאולה ועל התמורה which is, as best I can tell, not available on the internet. The second is ויואל משה which can be found here. It is ...


8

The Steipler Gaon in his compendium of letters known as the Kreinah D'Igresa letter 739. He was asked whether it is permitted to vote in the Israeli elections, The Steipler responds that “I don't understand the position of the Satmar Rebbe, though I agree with all that was written in his book...nonetheless the people have returned, it is a fact that the ...


7

To further Alex's answer: Many forms of proto-Zionism believed that Judaism could only survive with Jews living on their own in their own country; Hirsch fiercely believed that the Jew could live as a good citizen but a foreigner. Hirsch was opposed to most forms of collaboration with non-observant Jews. The teachers of secular studies in his educational ...


6

There are no explicit biblical proofs for this. However, there is a fairly famous statement in the גמרא in .כתובות קיא: רבי יוסי ברבי חנינא דאמר ג' שבועות הללו למה אחת שלא יעלו ישראל בחומה ואחת שהשביע הקדוש ברוך הוא את ישראל שלא ימרדו באומות העולם ואחת שהשביע הקדוש ברוך הוא את העובדי כוכבים שלא ישתעבדו בהן בישראל יותר מדאי This דרשא from a פסוק in שיר ...


5

As an example as to why Rabbi Akiva is used as the symbol of Bnei Akiva we have History Beginnings in Israel Bnei Akiva was established in Israel in 1929, as the youth movement of the Religious Zionist Mizrachi organisation, by Yechiel Eliash. The official founding date was set for Lag B’Omer 5689 (28th May 1929), a date associated with Rabbi ...


5

According to Rav Kook, and his son, Israel today is considered the quasi kingdom of Israel for many reasons. I list them here in no particular order. With the signing of the Balfour Declaration, the "three oaths" have been fulfilled, and the Nations of the world (like in the time of Cyrus) told the Jewish people that they are to return home and build their ...


4

I will limit my answer to the first oath שלא יעלו בחומה- "they shall not go up by a wall". All, if not most of the commentators interpret this phrase in a manner that makes the oath irrelevant in regards to Zionism. The general gist of these interpretations is that the oath is only violated when an armed force and/or most of the nation immigrates into the ...


4

The phrase 'Shimshon Hagibor' goes back to the 12th century in northern france in the peirush on Genesis 49 17a peirush identified with 'Rabeinu Tam' [Published by Avraham Shoshana 2017]. It appears in Sefer Chasidim 12th century as well. shortly afterwards appears in the Halachic book סמ"ג. Its Known that 'Hagibor' was attached to rabbi Shimshon of Metz, a ...


3

(was originally written by R' Yaakov Shapiro) Besides the slew of poskim and Gedolim from all walks of Torah Judaism who quote the Oaths l'halachah, pick up the Zionist journal "techumin" Vol. 10, and you will see the Oaths quoted l'halachah by none other than Rabbi Ovadiah Yosef. He discusses the issue of "Land for Peace", and mentions the fact that ...


3

The gemara you mention is also quoted in Ketubot (111a) along with "The 3 Oaths" that were made by both Jews and non Jews to God. The Jews would not return to Israel en masse (they would not return "as a wall") The Jews would not rebel against the non Jews The non Jews would not overly oppress the Jews. Rav Aviner wrote a book about various approaches to ...


3

It's orally reported (I heard it on a Rabbi Rakeffet mp3) that when Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was asked by Bnai Akiva about Hallel on Yom Ha'atzmaut, he replied: "nu, if it's a yomtov for you, then say Hallel; personally I don't." That may be the spirit you'll find here.


3

Rabbi Hershel Schachter points to the Gemara's observation that King Cyrus of Persia, the son of Queen Esther and King Achashverosh, has his years on the throne counted in some accounts from 1 Nissan (like Jewish kings), and in others from 1 Tishrei (like non-Jewish kings). Though he was the king of Persia, as long as he was sympathetic to Jewish causes (he ...


3

It is not a Chassidic-Misnagdic issue at all. Far from it. Satmar is Chassidic and Neturei Karta are not. They base much, or perhaps some, of their ideology on the Brisker Rav z"l. The typical, mainstream, approach is simply not to be busy about whether or not they were allowed to fight for a state, but rather to focus on what to do going forward. You can ...


3

The title of this question and the text of the question seem to me to be very different, and all of this would have been a comment until it got too long. I'll address the 'premises' of the question first. I don't really see how these assumptions connect to the question, other than the first (which has been strangely numbered '0'), but here it is: 0) The '...


2

Here is an article about Christian Zionism. With Zionism as you defined it in your question, there is a big difference to being a Zionist and being a Jew. With Wikipedia's definition of Zionism, this is a "movement of Jews and Jewish culture" by definition. Someone could ostensibly be a member of Jewish culture and not a Jew (many children of ...


2

For one perspective on how an anti-Zionist changed perspectives 180 degrees and became a supporter, I would highly recommend Eim HaBanim Semeicha by R Yissachar Shlomo Teichtal From Wikipedia Teichtal grew up as a staunch anti-Zionist Chasid of the Munkatsher Rebbe. However, during the Holocaust, Rabbi Teichtal changed his position from the one he ...


2

In the Torah, Zion is another name for Jerusalem or the Temple Mount, specifically the Chamber of Hewed Stone where the Great Sanhedrin resided. Nowadays, it is a term referring to a political movement based on the settling and building up of the land of Israel by jews. This political movement is divided into two parts, one which is secular, and one which ...


2

The anti-Semites have used the word "Zionist" instead of Jew in order to pretend that they are not anti-Semites (which itself is a way of hiding the original word Judenhass which means Jew hatred). If used as a slur Zionist just shows the ignorance of an anti-Semite. It really means the belief that Jews have the right to return to their homeland of Israel (...


1

Rav Yoel Teitelbaum held that interaction with the government itself may be a yehareig v'al ya'avor, but the Neturei Karta (N"K) seems to hold that for ALL people in Israel. R'Yoel also wrote that it was assur to visit the mekomos kedusha because it brings hana'ah to the government. I'm primarily going to address the opinion of Satmar: But failing to ...


1

This belief can be understood from some of R Hirsch writings where he writes that Eretz Israel is only a "means to an end in fulfilling the Torah" or "a tool to further [the Jewish people]'s mission" For instance in his Nineteen letters, letter eight It was to be a people in the midst of the peoples; as people it was to show the peoples that God is the ...


1

Neither story is accurate; the Satmar Rebbe's remark has been completely misconstrued. The real story was simply that during his visit, Humphrey spoke of his support for Israel and the Rebbe simply smiled. When asked afterwards, the Rebbe said "that's just his way of saying he's not an antisemite". All the other variations of this story are Zionist ...


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