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9

The Baal Hatanya, in his Shulchan Aruch (190:4), states that the cup can be passed to a child. (In footnote כז there it is noted that this is by analogy with various other cases where this may be done, such as havdalah on Motzaei Shabbos of the Nine Days, or a bris on Tisha B'Av.) The reason, he says, is: לפי שגם על המברך לא חל החיוב כלל שלא חייבוהו אלא ...


8

R' Shlomo Aviner was asked this question, and his response-- published on his website-- was that this WOULD be permissible for two reasons: 1) The wording isn't an essential part of benching הנוסח הזה הוא לא מעיקר הזימון That wording is not the essence of the zimun. The "birshus" is merely an addition. Sephardim, Ashkenazim, Yemenites, Yiddish-...


6

The nussach comes from the original procedure of Zimun. The Ba'al HaBayit - if he so wishes - honors one of those present with Zimun - so that the latter reciprocates with the Birkat Ore'ach. To acknowledge this permission-granted, in Nussach Ashkenaz, the honoree says "with permission of the Ba'al HaBayit" - Birshut Ba'al HaBayit. So refusing permission ...


6

A similar question is when Rosh Chodesh is on Sunday, do we say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo" in bentching of Shalosh Seudos? There the answer (see Mishna Berura Siman 188 Sif Katan 33) is that it's a sofek (a doubt) and so we don't, unless you would eat at least a kazis of bread after tzeis when it's definitely night and then you would definitely say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo." ...


6

The BT (Ber. 55a) cites R. Yitzhak who stated that one should not be appointed over a community without having the community consulted with first. For precedent, he refers to a communication between God, Moses and Israel on the appointment of Bezalel: אמר רבי יצחק אין מעמידין פרנס על הצבור אלא אם כן נמלכים בצבור שנא' (שמות לה, ל) ראו קרא ה' בשם בצלאל אמר ...


5

Shamayim is acronym of "שומע ומשמיע יחד מכוונים" it means that we all paying attention to the bless


5

I don't think the Magen Avraham says that. It looks like 193 discusses a more complex case of people leaving small groups and the remainder reassembling etc. Shulchan Aruch 195:1 simply says that if groups of people are eating in the same house or even two different houses, if some of the people at each table can see each other then they can combine for ...


5

The various spellings are trying to get at a vowel-less pronunciation of the final syllable: the syllabic n (for example, some English dialects pronounce "button" as "but'n", with a syllabic n at the end). From Uriel Weinreich's dictionary, in the section on non-YIVO-standard orthography: a superfluous ע is sometimes written before final ל or ן to mark ...


5

When there is a Zimmun, what is supposed to happen is the leader recites the entire Bentching aloud on the group's behalf and everyone else listens with the intent to fulfill their obligation and replies Amen at the relevant places. If one is unsure of his ability to pay attention to the leader the whole time (this is common), he should recite in an ...


4

The Talmud (Brachot 20b) debates if women are obligated to bentch biblically or rabbinically. It doesn't come to a clear conclusion. The Rambam (Brachot 5:1) and others rule it is a doubt and this is how the Shulchan Aruch (OC 186:1) concludes. Rashi (ibid. sv. או דרבנן) suggests that the Talmud considered that women might be exempt biblically from bentching ...


3

The Shulchan Arukh (OC 192:2) rules that if the leader forgot to add Eloheinu and the others had yet to respond, then he should go back and say it again with Eloheinu. If they recited the entire Zimmun without Eloheinu they do not repeat the Zimmun. The Baeir Heitev (ibid. sk 5) notes that if the gathered responded with Eloheinu then the leader should ...


3

Berachos 20b says that bentching before one is full is Rabbinic in nature. It brings this Halacha in the context of the following question: אמר ליה רבינא לרבא נשים בברכת המזון דאורייתא או דרבנן למאי נפקא מינה לאפוקי רבים ידי חובתן אי אמרת דאורייתא אתי דאורייתא ומפיק דאורייתא אלא אי אמרת דרבנן הוי שאינו מחוייב בדבר וכל שאינו מחוייב בדבר אינו מוציא את הרבים ...


3

Perhaps by Zimmun you are referring to the concern that the group will not hear the leader. Recall that Zimmun originally meant that the leader said all the blessings out loud and everyone fulfilled their obligation by listening. Thus if you couldn't hear the leader in a big room then you did not fulfill the biblical obligation of bentching. (Note also that ...


3

Ba'al HaTania (Shulchan Aruch Harav OC 193:10) states that חרש ואלם if they are not shote can be added to a zimun of 10, if they are not rov but not to zimun of 3 because there you need every one to answer. However, ביאור הלכה in OC 193 brings a ברכת אברהם saying that one can not be motzi another in birkat hamazon if the listener does not understand. In a ...


3

Shulchan Aruch (200:1) [based on Brachos 45b] discuses a case where three people were eating together, and two of them finished and wished to bench, while the third still wished to continue eating. The Halacha is that the third person is obligated to interrupt his eating in order to participate in the zimun, and then afterwards continues eating. In the event ...


3

Dan's answer addresses the salutation. The invitation to bless, however, might also do well to be adjusted. While in modern Hebrew (and, indeed, for a very long time, historically) the feminine, plural, first person call to bless is the same as the masculine (נברך), a more archaic form of the word (and thus, perhaps, a more correspondingly appropriate ...


2

Rabbi Dr. Ari Zivotofsky, in his article on women's zimmun (published in the OU's Jewish Action Magazine, Fall 5760/1999 issue (link)), suggests gevirotai or chaverotai.


2

A mixed-gender group can form a zimun if they're family. Details can be found in an article published in this journal. A news article about it can be found here, an English translation is here, and a discussion about it is here. I'll summarize it later.


2

Tosafot Yom Tov to Berachot 7:3 explains (based on Rif, based on a Yerushalmi) that adding the word ‘hamevorach’ to barechu said by one getting an aliyah (or, presumably, during tefillah) obviates the appearance of exclusion from the blessing. He suggests that we don’t add ‘hamevorach’ to birchat hamazon because it’s long enough already, but want to add it ...


1

As we see in Leading a zimun It is considered an honour to lead the zimun; there is a system of priority as to how to select the leader. It is usual to ask a guest to lead; when there is no guest present, the wisest diner is prioritised; it is also appropriate to offer the honour to a Kohen, although the host is entitled to lead whenever he wishes....


1

The 'eating together' that binds a group together for Zimmun would have to be eating. Preparing for the meal together, or performing any pre-meal prerequisites/rituals (such as washing hands) is not any form of kvius. Two groups of people who eat even in the same house (which two cars do not fit that description), can only be mitztaref for Zimmun if they ...


1

Shulchan Arukh, Orach Chayyim 200:1: שלשה שאכלו כאחד אחד מפסיק על כרחו לשנים ועונה עמהם ברכת זימון ואפילו לא רצה להפסיק מזמנין עליו בין עונה בין אינו עונה כל שהוא עומד שם אבל שנים אין חייבים להפסיק לאחד והלכך אין חיוב זימון חל עד שיתרצו להפסיק ולברך ואם לא רצו להפסיק וזימן הוא עליהם לא עשה כלום ואם לא רצו להפסיק אף הוא אינו רשאי לברך ולצאת לשוק עד ...


1

The ביאור הלכה in סימן קצט ד"ה ויוצאות says from the יד קטנה that a woman may not lead the zimun on behalf of men who are מחויב. Moreover he writes that the women must hear the zimun from a man, implying that three women at such a meal could not form their own zimun, following the rules of division of zimun found in סימן קצג סעיף א. However the מ"ב ס"ק יח ...


1

There's a Yorah Dai'oh 195 (13) type of issue in some cases.


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