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There is a famous Meiri (Rishon) which says that if an individual or a community experienced a salvation, they may recite Hallel every year on that day without a bracha. This is why some people say Hallel without a Bracha on Yom Hatzmaut. מאירי פסחים קיז.‏ כל יחיד שאירעתהו צרה ונגאל הימנה רשאי לקבוע הלל לעצמו באותו יום בכל שנה אלא שאינו מברך ...


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A Chosson fasts on Yom Yerushalaim


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Rabbi Eliezer Melamed rules in Peninei Halachah that one must say Halel. Hallel with a bracha He says elsewhere that Rabbi Shlomoh Goren (and Rabbi Gershoni, quoted in the footnote) ruled to say it with a blessing, and this is how Rabbi Tzvi Yehudah Kook acted. He also quotes Rabbi Meshulam Rata (Kol Mevaser 1:21) to say it with a blessing. Rabbi Sharki (...


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As far as I'm aware, there are two sources for the quote. The first source for this is the book קול התור, allegedly written by Rav Hillel Rivlin M'shklov (one of the Goan's students), some 200 years ago. The thing is that the published book is an "abridged version", as the initial writings were deemed too complicated. There are actually two published ...


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Originally the Chief Rabbinate of Israel ruled that one should say Hallel without a bracha on Yom Haatzmaut ("The Chief Rabbinate ruled to recite Hallel without a blessing." http://hirhurim.blogspot.co.il/2007/04/hallel-on-yom-ha-atzmaut.html?m=1; "Because of all, or some, of these concerns, the Chief Rabbinate’s Council originally prescribed that one recite ...


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While this is far from a "mainstream" concept, as far as I know, a number of yeshivot and Orthodox shuls in my mainly Orthodox neighborhood follow exactly this custom. (Do you live in NYC area, BTW?) The reasoning is that they don't support the current Israeli secular government, and feel that the founding of what is now Israel was based on mainly secular ...


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I have seen a number of Orthodox places / yeshivot (a few in my neighborhood) that are more inclined to say Hallel on Yom Yerushalayim and not on Yom Ha'atzma'ut. Part of it is a "political" statement. They don't "believe" in the current state of Israel with its secular government and philosophy. But, they agree on the importance, significance and holiness ...


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Not saying tachanun is not necessarily a reason to not fast on the wedding day... see here http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/481616/jewish/Fasting-On-the-Wedding-Day.htm gives examples when one would fast despite those days not having tachanun. All the more so on an unestablished holiday with little halachic support that one should fast on the ...


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Explicit instructions are given in the Rinat Yisrael siddur, widely used in Israel: במנחה שלפניו אין אומרים תחנון, ואם חל בשבת אין אומרים צדקתך. At mincha before it tachanun is not said, and if it is Shabbat, tzidkatcha is not said. (translation mine) You can view this on Hebrewbooks.


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