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12

Yeah, especially when a diaspora yom tov is adjacent to Shabbat, it sometimes feels like a long slog. I sometimes feel like I'm fighting an uphill battle because I didn't do this from birth -- it isn't a life-long routine. Here are some things that help me. (Some of these are dependent on your family and community situations, which I don't know.) Board ...


11

The source is the last Mishna in the first chapter of Chullin. Rav Ovadiah of Bartenura explains that indeed we only have a Havdala ceremony when moving from a higher holiness to a lower holiness, and the reason we say "Bein Kodesh leKodesh" generically between Shabbat and Yom Tov and not something like "from a higher holiness to a lower holiness" is so as ...


10

It's based on the Gemara Sukkah top of 45b: א"ר ירמיה משום ר"ש בן יוחי ור' יוחנן משום ר"ש המחוזי משום ר' יוחנן המכותי כל העושה איסור לחג באכילה ושתיה מעלה עליו הכתוב כאילו בנה מזבח והקריב עליו קרבן שנא' אסרו חג בעבותים עד קרנות המזבח anyone who makes a 'binding'/'issur' to the Festival with eating and drinking, the verse credits him as though he ...


9

There are two main Regalim - Pesach and Sukkot. Each one has another one-day mini yom-tov without special mitzvos afterwards. They are each called an "Atzeret" since they have no special mitzvot and are a culmination of the previous holiday. 7 weeks after the beginning of Pesach is Shavuot/Atzeret, and the day after Sukkot is Shemini Atzeret. The ...


9

I will start with the disclaimer that when I became religious, Yom Tov was a highlight for me, so I don't know how you will relate to what makes Yom Tov exciting for me. I am generally more of an intellectually-stimulated person, but something I found exciting about many mitzvos, but perhaps more so by Yom Tov, was understanding the meaning of the theme and ...


8

This is a matter of idiom. "Yom Tov" while literally meaning "Good Day" is the idiom for a day that is "good" because of the spiritual level of that day. Thus, when spoken as a single phrase, the translation is similar to the English original "Holy Day" which we now use as "holiday". The Yiddish "Yumtuf" or "Yuntif" shows that it is used a a single meaning. ...


8

The same people that went to shul at night on Shabbos went at night on Yom Tov. There are various reasons why there was no takana to say birchas me'ein sheva on Yom Tov. According to the Tur/Shulchan Orach in O'Ch 487, we don't say me'ein sheva on Pesach because it is Leil Shimurim, a protected night, so we don't need to worry about the dangers in siman 268....


8

The Maharsham (Daas Torah 444:1) and others (based on the Pri Megadim) allow instructing a gentile to perform hachanah and others allow doing so if necessary for a mitzvah, which would presumably include preparing for a yom tov seudah. See here (including the comment for more sources) and here.


8

You cannot begin to recite Kiddush, drink 4 cups and eat matsa and maror before the night (exit of the stars, later than sunset). The time the Jews left Egypt was at night. And the korban Pesach and matsot were eaten at night. Further eating of pesach dorot was established by Tora as a night mitsva. Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim 472.1 אבל לא יאמר קידוש עד ...


8

While the Arizal does indeed say that A) one should stand for Vayivarech David, and B) that one should give tzedakah standing during Vayivarech David, these customs are not dependent on one another. The Kaf HaChaim (OC 51:43 quotes the Arizal on standing during Vayivarech David as follows: וכ"כ האר"י ז"ל בשער הכוונות בענין תפלת השחר די"ח ע"ג וז"ל צריך ...


7

The Rambam (Hil. Tefilin 4:10) disagrees with you. He says: וכן שבתות וימים טובים, אינן זמן תפילין, שנאמר "והיו לך לאות" (ראה שמות יג,ט), ושבתות וימים טובים הן עצמן אות. The Rambam says clearly that Yom Tov is an אות and therefor does not warrant putting on Tefillin. The Rambam's source is a Gemara (Menachot 36): ר´ עקיבא אומר יכול יניח אדם תפילין ...


7

Great question! This is part of a major machlokes rishonim in maseches beitzah. The Ran in the beginning of the 3rd chapter says that really all melachos are allowed on a Biblical level, but the sages forbade melachos that are generally done for a long time, as harvesting is generally done on an entire field, not just what you need for that meal. ...


7

The reason that we keep 2 days on all festivals outside of Israel is because originally it was a doubt whether the new month had been declared, and word did not reach far enough for them to know by the middle of the month. Even once the calendar was set, they maintained the minhag of their predecessors (Beitza 4b). The Ba'al HaMe'or to Beitza 5a explains ...


7

This Star-K article by Rabbi Tzvi Rosen says: Although induction cooking offers a koshering benefit, the cooktop cannot be used on Shabbos or Yom Yov because the cooking connection is made once the pot is put onto the coil area. Similarly, one would not be able to remove the pot from the cooktop on Shabbos or Yom Tov because one would be “disconnecting” ...


7

R Eliezer Melamed (Peninei Halacha Moadim 9:8) writes indeed If one buys an apartment in Eretz Yisrael and lives there during his visits, he is considered a resident of Eretz Yisrael while there. R Melamed doesn't cite primary sources although he is, on his own, a well-respected and mainstream posek in Israel. His Peninei Halacha has become a standard text ...


6

The Torah mandates "simcha" on Yom Tov. The Talmud understands "simcha" to refer to eating meat and wine. Hence, the obligation to eat meat on Yom Tov. The exact parameters of this obligation are subject to much debate among the Poskim. The fours assumptions you quote are held by some Rabbis and rejected by others. As always, ask your LOR. The obligation ...


6

Yes, Shloshim is cancelled if Shiva ended before the holiday started. ShA YD 399:3


6

My parents were observant from before I was born, and I have been Shabbat- and Yom-Tov-observant my whole life. I can honestly say that I don't believe I have ever intentionally violated either. So no, based on one counterexample from personal testimony, for what that's worth, not everyone cheats. I do find that observance of Shabbat and Yom Tov, especially ...


6

This is indeed in Orchos Rabbeinu. It can be found in Volume II p. 136 of the 2014 edition. Here is an image of it:


5

In brief, no, this is not permissible. Two issues: 1 - See here regarding the problem of bleeding and causing a wound on Shabbat. Some say it is a prohibition of shochet - slaughtering. Others say this is a prohibition of dosh b/c blood is "extracted" from blood vessels and capillaries. The article does specifically mention giving a blood test on Shabbat, ...


5

from Halachipedia: Tosfot (Beitzah 30a s.v. Tenan) writes that the gezerah of Chazal only applied then when they were experts in fixing musical instruments but it wouldn’t apply to us since we’re not experts in that area. The Bet Yosef 339:3 writes that the implication of all the poskim who simply copy the prohibition of the Mishna is that they do not hold ...


5

The idea of Shabbos originated at Ma'asei Bereishis. (Creation). The Jews accepted the Shabbos 2448 years later. The Shmoneh Esrei (actually, the Amidah) of each tefillah represents a different approach to Shabbos. A. Ma'ariv refers to haShem's Creation; therefore, it starts "Atta Kidashta" this is like a heading. then we go on to say " ... Tachlis... ...


5

I sympathize with your story, but let's focus on the questions you stated: Does everyone actually cheat? Absolutely not. Most people who keep Yom Tov follow the normative Halacha. Why don't you hear other complainers? Try looking harder, as there are people willing to complain about anything and everything ; ) What do people actually do? They learn how to ...


5

B"H, I have solved my problem. I will post my experience here in case it could help anyone else. It turns out that what was making Yom Tov impossible for me was the fact that I lived alone and spent most of the time alone, except for going out to shul and perhaps one seudah a day. I would not recommend this to anyone. If you have ever tried it--please don'...


5

Google is your friend! The COR, Chabad, the OU, and the Star-K say you can light a burner from a pilot light on yom tov.


5

Magen Avraham (OC 529:2) writes that ideally one should eat Seudah Shlishit before Mincha Ketanah (9½ halachic hours after sunrise), but if he forgot to eat before, he may eat the meal even after Mincha Ketanah.


5

It seems to be a dispute in the poskim. The position that one is obligated: The Chazon Ish (quoted in Orchos Rabbeinu v.2 p.110, and in טעמא דקרא, הנהגות החזו״א אות י״ח) was mapkid to eat melaveh demalke on Motze Yom Tov. The Brisker Rav was asked (פניני רבינו הגרי״ז, עמ׳ רמ״ב) if there is an obligation for melave dmalka on Motzei Yom Tov, and he ...


5

(adapted from R' Josh Flug's YUTorah article "The Mitzvah of Simchat Yom Tov") The Beit Yosef (Orach Chaim 529:5) questions the Rambam's assertion that one must eat meat on Yom Tov (still leaves in wine though): ויש לתמוה על הרמב"ם למה הצריך שיאכלו בשר וישתו יין דהא בברייתא קתני דבזמן הזה אין שמחה אלא ביין ומשמע דביין סגי בלא בשר: One can ...


5

See Aruch Hashulchan 529:4 that one should have fish and meat on Yom Tov: ולקבוע כל סעודה על דגים ובשר, Mateh Ephraim 625:65/67 says similarly that one should have fish, meat, and wine: עתה נחזור לסדר הסעודה יש לו לענג את היו"ט בדגים ובשר ושאר המטעמים ויינות משובחים כפי עשרו ויכלתו See also Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Yom Tov Volume 2 Chapter 34 number 3 ...


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