6

In general, If there is a halachic doubt as to whether to say a bracha it is better to answer Amen to someone else's bracha then to say it yourself. This way you avoid the possibility of making a bracha levatala. This is done Shavuos morning: someone who slept will be motzi those who stayed awake with birchos hatorah, elokai netzor and ha'maavir shaina. (...


6

Abudarham (here, left column) quotes such reasoning in the name of R. Asher of Lunel, but the nuance of his reasoning is not so much that the miracle is “hidden”, rather it’s when the miracle is ostensibly natural/ordinary one does not consider it a miracle (vis-a-vis the blessing “... a miracle was done for me...” and, by extension, Hallel). (Cf. R. Ovadiah ...


6

There is a famous Meiri (Rishon) which says that if an individual or a community experienced a salvation, they may recite Hallel every year on that day without a bracha. This is why some people say Hallel without a Bracha on Yom Hatzmaut. מאירי פסחים קיז.‏ כל יחיד שאירעתהו צרה ונגאל הימנה רשאי לקבוע הלל לעצמו באותו יום בכל שנה אלא שאינו מברך ...


5

[Collected from the writings of Ha-Rav Aviner] Tachanun on Erev Yom Ha-Atzmaut It is proper to recite Tachanun at Minchah of Erev Yom Ha-Atzamaut, as the Chief Rabbinate of Israel has decreed this day "Remembrance Day for the Fallen Soldiers of Tzahal," which is a day of mourning.[1] [1]Iturei Cohanim #97, Shut She'eilat Shlomo 3:147, Sichot Ha-Rav Tzvi ...


5

Rabbi Eliezer Melamed rules in Peninei Halachah that one must say Halel. Hallel with a bracha He says elsewhere that Rabbi Shlomoh Goren (and Rabbi Gershoni, quoted in the footnote) ruled to say it with a blessing, and this is how Rabbi Tzvi Yehudah Kook acted. He also quotes Rabbi Meshulam Rata (Kol Mevaser 1:21) to say it with a blessing. Rabbi Sharki (...


4

As far as I'm aware, there are two sources for the quote. The first source for this is the book קול התור, allegedly written by Rav Hillel Rivlin M'shklov (one of the Goan's students), some 200 years ago. The thing is that the published book is an "abridged version", as the initial writings were deemed too complicated. There are actually two published ...


4

In this essay by R' Alan Haber of MMY, he makes an argument along the lines of: For those who do so, saying Hallel, and therefore rejoicing, on Yom Ha'atzma'ut is either a mitzva (e.g. according to R' Meshulem Roth) or at least a minhag. Mourning during the Omer is a minhag. The aspect of it that prohibits music generally, as opposed to weddings ...


3

In the Sefer Halachos Yom Ha'Atzmaus V'Yom Yerushalayim page 334-340 the Rishon L'Tziyon HaRav Yitzchak Nissim says that all Minhagim of Aveilus are suspended for the day. Per Rav Shmuel Katz from the Rabanut Hareishis L'Yisroel it is permissible. ‏'יום המדינה' ה' אייר שחל בימי הספירה, שלפי דיני ישראל נוהגים בהם אבילות, יהא דינו כיום ל"ג בעומר, ולפי ...


2

R' Eliezer Melamed discusses this in the Zmanim volume of פניני הלכה. He writes that the generally accepted approach to all of the minhagim of avielut of the omer is to be lenient with those things which would actually reduce the simcha of the day. For example, forbidding music and dancing would reduce the simcha so those are muttar but not allowing ...


2

R Eliezer Melamed in Peninei Halacha (Tefila 21:7) writes we do not say Tachanun on Erev Yom Haatzmaut Today, ever since Hashem began to bring forth our redemption, Tachanun is not recited on Yom HaAtzma’ut (Israel’s Independence Day), and on the 28th of Iyar, Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Liberation Day), nor at Minchah before each of them This is ...


2

The Koren Yom Haatzmaut Machzor says to say tachanun at mincha of erev yom haatzmaut if you daven during mincha gedola, but that one skips tachanun during mincha ketana.


2

Kehillat Shaarei Yonah Menachem, an Ashkenazic synagogue in Modiin, Israel, said הלל with a ברכה before and after, and also קל מלא, but skipped תחנון, on יום העצמאות‎ 5779/2019. I know because I was present at the time.


1

According to R' Mordechai Greenberg, head of Yeshivat Kerem B'Yavneh, in his essay "The Significance of Yom Ha'atzmaut", the holiday celebrates a turning point in history, inaugurating a process of redemption that continues to this day. R' Greenberg cites R' Avraham Yitzchak Kook as explaining that the Midrashic "Three Oaths" apparently preventing the Jews ...


1

Originally the Chief Rabbinate of Israel ruled that one should say Hallel without a bracha on Yom Haatzmaut ("The Chief Rabbinate ruled to recite Hallel without a blessing." http://hirhurim.blogspot.co.il/2007/04/hallel-on-yom-ha-atzmaut.html?m=1; "Because of all, or some, of these concerns, the Chief Rabbinate’s Council originally prescribed that one recite ...


1

While this is far from a "mainstream" concept, as far as I know, a number of yeshivot and Orthodox shuls in my mainly Orthodox neighborhood follow exactly this custom. (Do you live in NYC area, BTW?) The reasoning is that they don't support the current Israeli secular government, and feel that the founding of what is now Israel was based on mainly secular ...


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