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7

Taame Haminhagim (589–590) explains (in free translation): If he remains there, he might say it with them, and there's a covenant made with the lips [that what they say is true comes true]. Another reason is that everyone's busy saying Yizkor and he's silent, and it says in B'rachos that it should not be the case that all are busy etc. There's a ...


6

In most shuls that I daven at, the sifrei torah are placed on the bima during yizkor. That way, the people who were holding them can either go outside, or stand and say yizkor with proper kavana.


4

According to this OU article, Yizkor can be said at home: Why is Shul So Crowded? Can Yizkor be Recited at Home? It’s ironic that shuls become extra crowded because of a prayer that doesn’t need to be said with a minyan! It is not uncommon that people who are not regular synagogue attendees will appear on days when Yizkor is recited. There’s ...


4

The source of this custom is a letter (From Rosh Chodesh Shvat 5711) of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, where he writes what one should do for the first Yahrtzeit (10 Shevat 5711) of the Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe: להדליק נר שידלק כל המעת לעת. אם אפשר בקל - נר של שעוה. A yahrtzeit candle should be lit that will burn for the entire twenty-four hours. If ...


4

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


4

As a convert, I've only asked the question with respect to kaddish and shiva. I've posted the answers I've received on those questions elsewhere (in sum, my rav relying on the Rema said "no kaddish or shiva" but there are other chashuva sources who disagree; I go with my Rav). Since my late Rav, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt'l, said "no" to those questions, it ...


2

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


2

Divrei Torah Volume 3 #61 mentions a reason that I have heard - which he says is inaccurate. The reason he mentions is that Yom Kippur is like the last day of Rosh HaShana and we always say it on the last days of the Yom Tov. He says that is not accurate as they are separate Yomim Tovim. He then says that on Rosh HaShana we are only supposed to think of live ...


2

Chabad on line says that the entire Congregation, even those that do not say Yizkor, say Av Harachamim.


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The ArtScroll Siddur has Keil Maleh for Jewish martyrs and for members of the IDF.


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I haven't been able to locate a definitive source that authoritatively answers your question, so I hope that you'll be fine with what I infer from this source. The article, and the site is comprehensive, and I haven't found any other that delves into the history of tefilot as well. I will summarize some of the key points in the article. There is a ...


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Yom Kippur is a different question, but the others (as heard from my rosh yeshiva) all have the Torah reading that discusses what we're expected to give as sacrifices, "in accordance with what G-d grants you." (Deut. 16:17). Thus a good time to think about charity pledges. And part of Yizkor is about being in the merit of the charity we give.


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