12

A possible reason why we do not name children Yisro. Perhaps the reason we do not name Yisro is due to the fact that Yisro decides to return to Midian and ignores Moshe’s plea to remain with the Jewish people and help guide them into the Land of Israel. http://www.torah.org/learning/rabbiwein/5767/yisro.html


9

Alshich explains that Yisro was worried: Perhaps Moshe would not be interested in a Midyanite woman and would rather marry a Jewess. He therefore emphasized that he brought "her two sons" with him (and not "his two sons"), since a man comes to like his wife because of the children she bears him, and this would persuade Moshe to remarry Tziporah. (See also ...


7

The Gur Aryeh says that all the other miracles Yisro saw were localized, but these miracles affected the whole world. Rashi (Shemot 14:21) previously stated that all the water in the world split when the sea split. Rashi (Shemot 17:12) also says that during the war with Amalek, Moshe stopped the sun from setting. When Yisro saw that all the water split, he ...


6

Per Rashi he converted. According to the Even Ezra he converted after Matan Torah. The Ramban and Abarbanel say prior to Matan Torah. The Ramban says that he returned home afterwards to convert his family.


5

Yisro is not coming against the torah, but speaking of the practical method of governing the people. Moshe did not judge the people in that way on the instructions of Hashem, but based on his own understanding. Indeed. Yisro told Moshe to consult with Hashem and he would see that this practical advice is correct. Rashi explains Yisro 18:19 Now listen to ...


4

Nimukei Rashi (who spends several pages discussing this) understands that it was clear to Rashi already from the sequence of events as they are related in Sefer Devarim that this episode of Yisro's advice happened right after Moshe descended from Har Sinai (which is what "ויהי ממחרת" is referring to). However, it is not entirely clear which descending this ...


4

Mizrachi, on the Rashi to Shemos 18:1, seems to assume that according to the midrashic opinion that Yisro had seven names, which included both Chovav and R'uel, both Yisro and his father had the name R'uel.


4

This is the opinion of Rabbeinu Bachya/Bechayei to Shemos 18:9, who says that Yisro was a grandson of Avraham, through Avraham's son, Midyan: וכשם שהיו עשרה דורות מנח ועד אברהם כך תמצא עשרה דורות מחם בן נח עד מדין בן אברהם ועשרה דורות ממצרים בן חם עד יתרו שהוא מבני מדין Edit: It's also found in a midrash on this same verse. Edit: and here's a source ...


3

I think it's simply that Yisro is the first interesting word in the text. (As Al Berko wrote in his comment.) But we shouldn't underestimate how much his contribution added to the giving of the Torah. We generally discuss his suggestion to have a hierarchy of "sarim" (leaders) in terms of courts and adjudication. But they were there to answer questions in ...


3

First of all The Gemora Bava Bathra 110a says that Pinchas' grandmother who married a man from the Tribe of Yosef was Yisro's daughter, they had a daughter who married Elazar who had a Son Pinchas. אלא אי אבוה דאמיה מיוסף אמה דאמיה מיתרו אי אבוה דאמיה מיתרו אמה דאמיה מיוסף דיקא נמי דכתיב מבנות פוטיאל This marriage between the man from the tribe of Yosef ...


3

Yisro's daughter Tzipora was in Egypt (as explained by the Ramban quoting Midrash Shemos Rabba here Why Moses didn't care for his sons after leaving Egypt? ) with Moshe Rabeinu when he went as an Emmisary on behalf of Hashem to let the Jewish people go. When he arrived in Egypt and was reminded of how he escaped from Pharoh, he called his son Eliezer ...


2

All Mefarshim to 18:21 here: Ibn Ezra in his first Peirush quotes a number of opinions, and defends the calculation that you made, and his conclusion is that approximtely 1/8 of the nation were Sarim. However, in his second Peirush, he rejects this from a Peshat perspective, and gives a different understanding of what Sarei "#" are. Ralbag also rejects ...


2

@mevaqesh cites נתנאל בירב פיומי as having said. “Seven prophets prophesied to the nations of the world before the giving of the Torah: Laban, Jethro, Balaam, Job, Eliphaz, Bildad and Zophar.” The gemara Bava Basra 15b (ArtScroll 15b1 top of the page) gives a different list which does not include Yisro. Seven Prophets prophesied for the nations of ...


2

Artscroll (in their edition of Rashi, p. 206) translates your quote as "because he caused one more passage of the Torah to be written" and comments "He caused one more passage of the Torah to be written" does not mean that there was a change made in the Torah. It is a basic tenet of Judaism that the Torah can never be changed. Rather, this means that ...


1

The Zohar (vol. 2, p. 67b) states that Yisro's recognition of Hashem was a necessary prerequisite for the Torah to be given: רָזָא דְּמִלָּה, בְּשַׁעֲתָא דְּהַאי מֶלֶךְ וְהַאי כֹּהֵן אִתְכַּפְיָין, וְאִתְּבָּרוּ, כְּדֵין כָּל סִטְרִין אַחֲרָנִין אִתְכַּפְיָין, וְאוֹדָן לֵיהּ לְּקוּדְשָׁא בְּרִיךְ הוּא, כְּדֵין קוּדְשָׁא בְּרִיךְ הוּא שָׁלִיט בִּלְחוֹדוֹי ...


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