10

The context of that passage does not refer to Biblical corruption. The general chapter in Jeremiah concerns God's expressed frustration at the people for not listening to Jeremiah's prophesies. It is in this context that the scriptural passage appears, which is: אֵיכָה תֹאמְרוּ חֲכָמִים אֲנַחְנוּ וְתוֹרַת יְהֹוָה אִתָּנוּ אָכֵן הִנֵּה לַשֶּׁקֶר עָשָׂה עֵט ...


7

Radak says that the verse (except the initial "tell them thus") is what Jeremiah was telling the Jews outside Israel to tell the Gentiles there — which would of course be in Aramaic. And the "tell them thus" is in Aramaic to keep the entire verse one language. He doesn't comment on the issue of 25:27.


7

The Rambam knew the pasuk in Yirmeyahu. Just because one has a question based on a plain-text interpretation of a verse, that doesn't mean that people should stop teaching the Rambam. There are many Biblical verses, and many Mishnayot that are interpreted in ways other than what the plain-text meaning seems to be. Rambam designed his framework based on ...


7

Apparently (according to Wikipedia) the date & place of Jeremiah's death is not documented in classical sources. However, we are taught that the 2nd temple was built with the guidance of the Anshei Knesset HaGedola - an institution that included - at the time - prophets such as Chagai, Malachi & Zecharia. Source: Talmud, Zevachim 62a: אמר רבה בר בר ...


7

The following is based on Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's understanding of the history as presented in his introduction to: The Torah Anthology - Book of Esther (translation of Yalkut Me'am Loez by Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan). It is based in part on Megila 11b-12a. Versions of Yirmiyahu's prophecy: (said in 3331 - 460 BCE) וְהָיְתָה כָּל הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת לְחָרְבָּה ...


7

Shalshelet HaKabbalah writes that ‘they’ say that Yirmeyahu was stoned to death in Egypt, by the Jewish refugees who had brought him there against his will. [I think it’s safe to assume that this event took place long before the rebuilding of the Temple.]


6

The Haftorah is very moving and probably hold the record for the most Jewish songs from one Haftorah! It especially relates to the Rosh Hashanah theme of Zichronos ("Memories"). First, (verses 1-13), the Haftorah discusses God bringing the redemption, which may connect to the theme of Zichronos, as it involves God "remembering" the Jews. ...


5

The following is a verse from Isaiah (50:1) which helps us in our understanding this verse: כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה, אֵי זֶה סֵפֶר כְּרִיתוּת אִמְּכֶם אֲשֶׁר שִׁלַּחְתִּיהָ, אוֹ מִי מִנּוֹשַׁי, אֲשֶׁר-מָכַרְתִּי אֶתְכֶם לוֹ; הֵן בַּעֲו‍ֹנֹתֵיכֶם נִמְכַּרְתֶּם, וּבְפִשְׁעֵיכֶם שֻׁלְּחָה אִמְּכֶם. Thus says God: Where is the the bill of your mother's divorce with ...


4

The verse separates clearly between Israel and Judah -- the standard language referring to the Northern and Southern (Davidic) kingdoms: Israel had committed adultery, I had put her away and given her a bill of divorcement that yet treacherous Judah her sister feared not; but she also went and played the harlot So it seems Israel ends up with a divorce (...


4

God takes the children of Israel back. No other nation replaces them: http://ohr.edu/tw/5756/devarim/haazinu.tw In times to come, when Israel is redeemed from among the nations and Hashem gathers us to Him, Israel will say "Master of the Universe, it's written in Your Torah that when a man divorces his wife and banishes her from his life, should ...


4

It means the Bais Hamikdash (the holy temple). As an example, Yirmiyahu is referring to King Menashe who placed idols within the temple. II King 21:4-5. 4 And he built altars in the house of the Lord, concerning which the Lord had said, "In Jerusalem I will establish My Name." 5 And he built altars for the entire host of Heaven in the two courts ...


3

The text does not say that the Moshiach will be Hashem Tzidkeinu, but that the (characteristic of) righteousness and (the holiness of) G-d’s name will be in Moshiach's name. The midrash itself say that this refers to Hashem's name not to Hashem himself: דְּאָמַר רַבִּי לֵוִי טָבָא לִמְדִינְתָּא דִּשְׁמָהּ כְּשֵׁם מַלְכָּהּ וְשֵׁם מַלְכָּהּ כְּשֵׁם ...


3

No. If you read that wiki article you linked to, you'll see the word Magi doesn't appear anywhere until the century after Jeremiah. The meaning of the word magor is given on those verses as meaning fear, or possibly gathering. Also, I don't know why you state Magi was a deity. They were sorcerers.


3

Judaica Press explains in Yirmiyahu 18:9 that there is a machlokes between Rambam on the one hand and Abarbene and Ibn Nachmiash on the other hand about this matter. Rambam holds that the prophesy (by a true prophet) will come about but if the people sin, it will not last. I have also seen referenced (about the decree at Rosh Hashana for the coming year) ...


3

Keep in mind the appearance of a Navi was fearsome. Samson's mother thought the awe-inspiring angel that came to see her was a human prophet (Judges 13). Hence, there was no need to teach on the greatness of the torah, they could see it manifestly. The Chovos Halevavos talks about this in Gate 6 ch.5: When one fixes his mind on this great theme and ...


3

The bolded section is the commentary on the second part of the verse. I added some punctuation and separated it into sections to make it clear which part of the verse he is commenting on. מֵֽרָעַ֣ת יֹֽשְׁבֵי־בָ֗הּ בסבת רשעת יושבי בה (paraphrasing "from" as "because of") סָֽפְתָ֤ה בְהֵמוֹת֙ וָע֔וֹף וכלתה בהמות ועוף, כי לא תרבינה בארצם ...


2

Yirmiyahu - Jeremiah - Chapter 8 How do you say, "We are wise, and the Law of the Lord is with us"? Verily, behold it is in vain, he made a false scribes' pen. ח. אֵיכָה תֹאמְרוּ חֲכָמִים אֲנַחְנוּ וְתוֹרַת יְהֹוָה אִתָּנוּ אָכֵן הִנֵּה לַשֶּׁקֶר עָשָׂה עֵט שֶׁקֶר סֹפְרִים: (Rashi translation) Verily, behold it is in vain: Behold your wisdom is in vain ...


2

According to this site you can download a german translation of the Tanach by (Reform Rabbi[1]) Dr. Ludwig Philippson from here.


2

Note that this is not predicting Israel's "darkest day" but it is predicting the massive downfall of the oppressing power which will lead to the salvation of Bnai Yisrael. However, during that time it will appear to be a time of tribulation. Reading the next pesukim Yirmiyah 30:8-9 we see that it can be the coming of the mashiach (which is why Rashi refers ...


2

How do you see a hint at intermarriage? Yirmiyahu is encouraging the Jewish people to keep building Klal Yisrael through marriage, even though they are in exile. Don't despair, since eventually they'll come back to israel. (This would seem to be in contrast to what Amram [Moshe's father] initially held, when he decided that it was better to divorce his wife ...


2

In terms of the description in chapter 6:20-23, Yirmiyahu is most likely describing the Scythians. The mention of where they originate from, the North, meaning the Ukraine, and their distinctive, characteristic weaponry, a unique bow and spear, and that they ride on horseback and part of their cultural/religious behavior is the use of marijuana (קנה בוסם) ...


2

Regarding the ability to carry out a mission, the term נַ֣עַר would usually not mean child (under bar mitzvah). For example, Avaraham took Eliezer and Yishmael with him to the Akodah and both of them are referred to as נַ֣עַר. However, Yitzchak was 37 years old at the Akeidah and Yishmael was 50 (13 years old when Yitzchak was born). Eliezer had already ...


1

The Hebrew word משא literally means a 'burden', but is often used in the Prophets to mean a prophecy, and specifically a negative prophecy of a burden some nation will be made to bear. The classical commentator Rashi explains on Jeremiah 23:33 (link is Hebrew, this is a loose translation) 'What is the burden of the Lord' - This was said as a jest, since ...


1

No connection to drunkenness, but this Malbim seems to say that he made an effort to not become happy, to avoid "bad" prophecy. מלבים ירמיה פרק ט"ו פסוק י"ז לא ישבתי בסוד וחברת משחקים שאעלז ואשמח למען תחול עלי הנבואה על ידי השממה כי מפני ידך ונבואתך בדד ישבתי תמיד כי מלאת אותי בנבואה של זעם ופורעניות


1

The Navi (Yirmiyahu) and the Eicha Rabbati you quote are understood by looking at the posuk which precedes, namely, Yirmiyahu 23:5. הִנֵּ֨ה יָמִ֤ים בָּאִים֙ נְאֻם־יְהוָ֔ה וַהֲקִמֹתִ֥י לְדָוִ֖ד צֶ֣מַח צַדִּ֑יק וּמָ֤לַךְ מֶ֙לֶךְ֙ וְהִשְׂכִּ֔יל וְעָשָׂ֛ה מִשְׁפָּ֥ט וּצְדָקָ֖ה בָּאָֽרֶץ׃ The reference is to the righteous one which G-d will make sprout from ...


1

The important details to understand from this quote is that this covenant is only with the Jewish people, not with non-Jews. Additionally, it is important to include the 35th through 39th posukim from the chapter which emphasizes that the Torah of Moshe, 'these ordinances', shall always be. They shall not be 'plucked out' or 'thrown out' even by a false ...


1

The one aspect of this quote which I can point to in Chazzal is the fact that Hashem will punish the child for his fathers sins when the child continues in his fathers ways. This is found in Brachos 7a and Sanhedrin 27b. The explenation given כי עוון של דורות חמור יותר מעוון של פרט אחד does not appear there. In fact by reading the gemara in Sanhedrin and ...


1

I will establish based on hebrew grammar from Jacob Wiengreen


1

The Malbin always explains that שָׂשׂוֹן is the external manifestation of happiness, and שִׂמְחָה is feeling happy. See, for example, the Malbim on ישעיה Posuk 22:13 וְהִנֵּה שָׂשׂוֹן וְשִׂמְחָה הָרֹג בָּקָר וְשָׁחֹט צֹאן אָכֹל בָּשָׂר וְשָׁתוֹת יָיִן אָכוֹל וְשָׁתוֹ כִּי מָחָר נָמוּת: שמחה היא שמחת הלב הפנימית, וששון היא המחול והריקוד והמשתה אשר יעשו להרים ...


1

The Mahari Kara also says all three t'rumos are called "reshis". I think they're probably t'ruma g'dola (called "reshis" in Bamidbar 18:12 and D'varim 18:4), t'rumas maaser (never explicitly called "reshis" that I know of, but it's called "t'ruma" in Bamidbar 18:26 and compared to t'ruma g'dola in Bamidbar 18:27), and chala (called "reshis" and "t'ruma" in ...


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