10

My Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Ahron Lopiansky, who is particularly well read in history, in a shiur titled Why So Much Iyun 5774 spoke out that (my memory of the shiur is not that sharp, so I may be misquoting him or leaving out a detail and suggest you see the shiur) the chachamim of that generation saw that although the method you described was the proper way to ...


5

See https://www.halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Halachot_Related_to_Coronavirus#Laid_off_Workers_Because_of_Corona Rabbi Zylberman on yutorah. Mordechai b"m 343 writes that if there's a decree in the town that the teachers can't teach the teachers should still be paid. Rama C.M. 321:1 cites this Mordechai and applies it to any worker in 334:1. Netivot ...


5

Slabodka Yeshiva was originally in Lithuania and after the ravages of WWI and enforced military conscription in the years that followed, they established a branch in Chevron in 1924. Following the Chevron Massacre they then moved again to Yerushalayim. Ponovezh Yeshiva was founded in 1908 and was also originally located in Lithuania. It moved to Bnei Brak ...


4

I understand your question, but at the same time I need you to understand that it's basically impossible to know since I don't know you. Though, it's always a good idea to look at what Chazal (Sages) have to say about the matter... Make sure that your Chavrusah (Teacher I presume) is a pure fellow - Moed Katan 17a The use of Mnemonics is important, it ...


3

There are many yeshivot geared specifically to both Israeli and foreign balei teshuva in Jerusalem. Admissions criteria vary, but in general their mission is to educate Jews and they are not selective. It would certainly help to have a command of the aleph-bet (Hebrew alphabet) and some knowledge of Chumsh (the five books of Moses) before entering a yeshiva, ...


3

It seems Ashkenazi Jews of the time - including the Tosafists - lacked formal secular knowledge. Rabbi Prof. Ephraim Kanarfogel wrote in the essay "The Tosafist Oeuvre and Torah u-Madda": "The Ba'alei ha-Tosafot flourished in northern France and Germany (Ashkenaz) during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. While the Jewish communities of ...


2

Really interesting thread. I think it does illustrate at least one reason why Chabad is "controversial": You can see from the comments that Chabad people have their traditions about the attitudes of the rest of the Orthodox world, and the rest of the Orthodox world sees those traditions as being inaccurate, out of touch. "Everyone else ...


2

Your premise is stated as follows: There is a Tosafot in Sanhedrin 24a that says that by learning Gemara one does not fulfill what the Gemara (Kidushin 30a, Avoda Zara 19a) says: one should split his learning into three --- Tanach, Mikra, and Gemara. I know he answers this question saying that we fulfill this obligation by reading the Korbanot and prayers ...


2

Most yeshivos have such a learning schedule. Some "american" yeshivos in Eretz Yisroel follow mostly what you wrote but will shorten the "29 day break until RC Iyar" break either by continuing the zman closer to pesach or starting soon afterwards to enable students to leave and go to american camps which tend to span 8-9 weeks beginning ...


1

Sam's answer is probably the main point, but I would like to add that in Volozhin, the yeshiva pace was a daf a day, so they covered all of Shas over a seven year cycle. So their iyun pace would be today's bekius pace. If you look at Meromei Sadeh, which is the Netziv's shiurim on Gemara, you see he covered all of Shas. R' Chayim Soloveichik used to learn ...


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