Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
34

I graduated from public school. My comments are not a result of the caliber of the education or even the environment - my school won national competitions in academic competitions, and was a very clean and safe environment. But I would never think of sending my child to the best public school. 1) - My school (which ended a bit earlier than the schools ...


23

I write as an Orthodox Jew, a parent and a teacher. The answer is both simple and complex. First, the money. Yes, public school is cheaper. Can't get around that. Next however is the contention that Jewish schools lack "technology and extra curriculars" -- this is not true for a huge chunk of Jewish schools out there. From teams to clubs and from iPads and ...


16

The child attending public school knows that his attendance is compulsory, because his parents and the government consider his education of the utmost importance. Together with this comes the recognition that what is really important and essential to his education is taken care of in the school. The child’s instinctive feeling and inference from ...


15

One of my rabbeim, who was a student of R' Elya Svei explained this to me as follows: The yeshiva curriculum includes masechtos from nashim and nezikin, such as Yevamos, Kesuvos, Gittin, Kiddushin, Bava Kama, Bava Metzia, Bava Basra etc. for two main reasons: There are classic commentaries on Talmud Bavli, and these masechtos include more of the ...


14

A FarHer in "Yeshivish" terms means an (usually oral) exam. It is commonly used when referring to the entry exam given to student applicants before accepting them into a Yeshiva. From here: Languages of Origin - Yiddish Etymology פֿאַרהערן farhérn 'to examine'; פֿאַרהער farhér 'interrogation, hearing; audition'


13

Rabbi Berel Wein has suggested that long ago, there were a certain amount of anti-Sephardic animosity related to the fact that when during the Crusades, the Ashkenazic Jews forced to choose between the cross and the sword went to their deaths; whereas during the Spanish Inquisition, many Spanish (i.e. Sephardic) Jews chose to stay alive and outwardly profess ...


13

In Igros Moshe YD 1:137, R' Moshe Feinstein writes that although at a very young age, the issues of hirhur and yetzer hara that generally rise with co-ed schools facilitating pubescent teenagers mixing with each other do not apply, nevertheless 'אין רוח חכמים נוחה מזה'. He deliberates whether this (for young children) is halachically forbidden due to ...


11

http://halachafortoday.com/QandA4.aspx A: The Chazon Ish ruled that one who made up his mind to give Tzedaka to a certain poor person who was collecting, and then the poor person disappeared (similar to your case of the organization closing down) you can give the money to a different poor person (or in your case a similar institution) The best ...


10

I went to a Chafetz Chaim Yeshiva and here are the basic Hashkafot (to my understanding): Gadlus HaAdom- meaning that the person has a lot of potential and should have self respect for themselves by dressing nicely. The high school system has a very long day to prepare the students for the long day of Bet Midrash (the Yeshiva expects kids to go to Bet ...


10

My father, who grew up orthodox in Brooklyn during the depression era, went to public school for High School. He told me that although there were a few Yeshivas, and most of the children went to Public School in that period. He had a Hebrew tutor in the afternoon, yet he told me that many did not. Although there were some Yeshivos (Chaim Berlin, Torah ...


9

It depends what you mean by semicha -- there is a basic level of "being a rabbi" that is summarized here: There is a new form of semicha which is circulating today, known as the "Rav Umanhig" semicha. This is essentially a semicha which does not necessarily vouch for the recipient's knowledge or competency in halacha, but rather, testifies that the ...


9

A Yo'etzet Halakhah is there to answer questions that are going unasked because some women are understandably embarrassed to raise them with a male rabbi. They can also find answers that wouldn't cross a man's mind simply because the territory is more familiar. The only halachic decisions they give are ones where the questioner's community has a well ...


9

Explanation #1 is a corruption of the real reason it was started in Slabodka by the Alter. The talmidim were so into their learning they couldn't stop talking about it and ended up talking during chazaras hashatz. The Alter felt it was a chillul Hashem (albeit unintentional), so he established the minhag of heicha kedushah. All yeshivos that come from ...


9

Although America is a much more religious country than other developed Western democracies, the typical social atmosphere among young Americans is extremely secular and often anti-religious. Most of American popular culture is devoid of religion and consistently promotes a social liberalism (indeed, often libertinism) that is at odds with the teachings of ...


9

The one high school Yeshiva in North America for the deaf is Yeshivas Nefesh Dovid (http://www.nefeshdovid.com/) located in Toronto. The Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Chaim Tzvi Kakon, himself is deaf and got his S'micha from Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore, MD.


9

In Yeshivat Chachmei Lublin by Dovid Avraham Mandelbaum p. 322 we are given the daily schedule of the yeshiva, from which we can see what texts were studied: My English rendering: 6:00 AM – Wakeup 7:30 AM – Morning Prayer 8:45 AM – Lecture on the Rif in order 9:15 AM – Breakfast/break 10:00 AM – Review of the lectures 11:45 AM – Lecture in Mikvaot on Sun/...


9

I believe most or all Israeli yeshivot targeting English-speaking baalei tshuva will accept people year-round. A few links to get you started: Ohr Somayach Aish HaTorah Shapell/Darchei Noam Machon Meir Good luck on your search !


8

First of all, it's worth noting that, with only certain key exceptions, there weren't really any yeshivas in Eastern Europe before Volozhin, their having been replaced by the beis midrash, and by a system known as kest. This was a phenomenon by which young, married men were supported by their fathers-in-law to learn Torah; they would typically live with him, ...


8

An עסקן is a community activist i.e. someone who is "osek b'tzarchei tzibbur" עוסק בצרכי צבור (cf Mi Shebaurach after Yekum Purkan prayer before Shabbos musaf where this expression is found)


8

As per this article, the Mir is composed of a multitude of study groups, called Chaburot. Each Chabura is subdivided by Shiur (class), with one Maggid Shiur (lecturer) teaching an average of 40 to 60 students. As no two individuals are the same, each Maggid Shiur has his own style of learning and teaching. However, according to this article, the Mir has ...


8

This is indeed a serious issue and has been discussed by many rabbonim. There have been a number of articles on this. Here are a few. Jerusalem - R’ Ovadia Yosef: It Is Forbidden To Expel Children From Yeshiva Rav Ovadiah Yosef explains how he was able to actually turn a boy around before he was expelled. Parshat Vayetzei Vol.10 No.12 Expelling Students ...


8

The Igros Moshe YD 2:103 writes that it is a deplorable act for a Rebbi to ask his student to tell on another student who did something bad,and it will lessen the seriousness of loshen harah. The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Loshen Harah 5 writes that even if a father or rebbi asks him to say lashon harah it is prohibited. However, in a case of to'eles it is ...


7

Rav Moshe Shternbuch writes in Teshuvot VeHanhagot 2:457 that even though the gemara implies one should learn tanach first, this is no longer true as learning tanach can be dangerous for learning it simply (without appropriate commentaries and guidance) can lead one to heresy. As such, one should first learn lots of gemara and only then dabble in tanach with ...


7

It is important to understand that the Semicha of today is not "Traditional Semicha" which was only given in an unbroken chain from Moshe Rabbeinu down, from each teacher to their (worthy) students. That Semicha was lost long ago. (Although it is possible to bring back according to the Rambam, and was attempted by Rav Yaakov Beirav in 1538). What, then, is ...


7

Pilpul is not so much a method of learning as it is a method of applying one's learning. It is thought to have started with R' Yaakov Pollak in the 15-16th century, and involves the linking together of disparate texts on the basis of lexical and thematic similarities. It has its detractors, but chiefly because it has been taken to illogical extremes by those ...


7

Chassidus twice a day - From 7:30 am for 2 hours (but better to start at 7 and learn for 2.5 hours) and 9-11 pm (but those who needed to go to sleep early could come and leave early). See details in Kuntres Etz Hachaim (Written by the rebbe Rashab for the talmidim) pg 51-52 chapter 25


7

HaRav Eliyahu Mansour just touched on this topic in his derashah on Parashat Noahh 5775 (link): The Hazon Ish (Rav Avraham Yeshaya Karelitz, 1878-1953) cautioned that in our times, the decision to expel a student from Yeshiva requires a 23-member Bet Din. According to Halacha, life-and-death cases cannot be brought before a standard, three-member court; ...


7

Generally, the Classic Lithuanian Yeshiva is focused on those tractates that provide ample area for "Lomdus"/"Iyun" - "Analyses: (Shabbos), Sukka, Psachim, Yevamos, Kesubos, Nedarim, Gittin, Kiddushin, the 3 Babas, Sanhedrin. Maakos. They learn these with the commentary's of Rashi, the different Tosfos, Rashba, Ritva, Rif, Rosh, Ran, Ramban, and other ...


7

The Talmud (Bava Batra 21a) presents the following dispute: ואמר רבא האי מקרי ינוקי דגריס ואיכא אחרינא דגריס טפי מיניה לא מסלקינן ליה דלמא אתי לאיתרשולי רב דימי מנהרדעא אמר כ"ש דגריס טפי קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה Raba also said: If we have a teacher who gets on with the children and there is another who can get on better, we do not replace the first by ...


6

Being a follower of Chabad Lubavitch, I will approach this question from my perspective. It appears from your question that your primary concern with the Chabad philosophy is what you term "Chabad Messianism", and how that is perceived by other Orthodox groups. I am assuming you are referring to the belief that the Rebbe is Moshiach. I wish clarify from the ...


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