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21

The "Modim anachnu lach" in davening is a quotation from Divrei Hayamim I 29:13. "L'cha" becomes "lach" because of the etnachta, which is a pause in the pasuk.


21

Emunat Chachamim צomes from Avot 6:6 where a list of 48 ways of achieving Torah wisdom are mentioned. There are many commentatries on Avot in general and this mishna in particular, all saying slightly different things. However.. Traditionally, this phrase is meant to mean that you must trust those people who are wiser than you to give over the tradition ...


21

The Taamei HaMinhagim, in "הנהגות אדם בבוקר" says: ג טעם שתקנו רז״ל לומר על נט״י בנוסח ברכה זו לשון נטילה, מפני שהוא לשון הגבהה מתרגום "ותשאני רוח" "ונטלתני", וכתיב (ישעיה ס"ג) "וינטלם וינשאם כל ימי עולם" - שצריך שיגביה ידיו למעלה (שלחן ארבע) :‏ ד עוד טעם לפי שצריך ליטול מן הכלי והכלי שמו נטלא בלשון תלמוד. אבודרהם:‏ That is, that ...


20

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


19

"L'chatchila" means "from the outset", meaning that before one did action 'x' the halacha was that it was forbidden. However, if one was not familiar with that halacha and did action 'x' without knowing that there was a problem, then "b'di'eved" ("after the fact") the halacha might be different, meaning the consequences of what was done would change. In ...


18

Jastrow says it indicates the subjunctive mood. If so, in Gen. 26:10, כִּזְעֵיר פּוֹן שְׁכֵיב means "he almost had lain" as opposed to "he almost lay"; in Gen. 31:27, וְשַׁלַּחְתָּךְ פּוֹן means "I'd have sent you" as opposed to "I sent you"; in Num. 22:29, אִלּוּ פּוֹן אִית חַרְבָּא means "if there were a sword" as opposed to "if there is a sword"; and in ...


17

Having grown up "heimish" I will do my best to explain. The first thing I tell people that ask me to define Heimish, is "mixed up". From the outside looking in, our accent in davening is typically that of chassidim, yet we (For the most part) are clean shaven (which is a huge no-no in the chassidish world). You might see us wear a gartel on shabbos (...


17

I can't speak for the Jewish community generally, but I, for one, do support the use of "Jew" in non-anti-Semitic contexts, consistent with my experience that this is, in fact, a standard use of the term to which Jews do not take offense and my general aversion to unjustified taboos. I have been an English-speaking observant Jew for over three decades now, ...


17

Ibn Ezra to Genesis (3:6) suggests that Adam had sex with Eve as a result of eating from the Tree of Knowledge. Therefore, sex is euphemistically referred to as knowledge. Additionally, he notes that the sex drive develops as a person becomes aware of good and evil; further reason for the euphemism. Radak to Genesis (4:1 (3:20)) seems to imply this as ...


16

HaSeder Ha'aruch (134:9-13) collects several answers to this question: The wise son says "אתכם" since he did not personally hear the command, and he is referring to the generation which left Egypt. Since he mentions Hashem -"Which the L-rd, our G-d has commanded" he is not excluding himself. However, the wicked son who does not mention Hashem in his words ...


15

This idea, that it's based on a mistaken expansion of 'בשב (meaning 'בשמואל ב) to mean בשבת, comes from R. Baruch Epstein's Mekor Baruch. However, it is demonstrably untrue. The custom of alternating between מגדיל on weekdays and מגדיל on Shabbos is mentioned by Avudraham, who lived in the 14th century. (He doesn't mention the custom of doing so on Yom Tov ...


15

Indeed, a keen observation. This observation is made as well by Abarbanel and Malbim, who both explain that the first time, Shmuel ran to Eli, as he was Eli's servant and he was motivated to serve him properly. However, when he went to Eli, and it turned out Eli had never called him in the first place, he was a bit embarrassed. So the second time, he was ...


15

In his commentary to I Kings 6:7: ומקבות" - דלוט"א בלשון רוסיא" Although it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the ...


15

The literal meaning of דבטש בכספתא is: kicked the money-box - as Rashi says in Shavuos Daf 30b: בטש. בעט And similarly in Eiruvim 54a: בטשה ביה. בעטה בו And in Shabbos 116b: אתא חמרא ובטשא. דחפתו לארץ So the שורש of דבטש is בטש - and I suspect it's Aramaic - and the ד means that, to give us that kicked. כספתא is a money box, as Rashi says in ...


14

The Shach (Yoreh De'ah 179:11) ruled that "God" spelled in a foreign language does NOT have the status of a "shem" and thus may be erased, lehatkhila. For more information, you can read this article: Writing: Why do some people write "G-d" with a hyphen instead of an "o"?.


14

On a simplistic level, Chochmah is Wisdom. It is an ability or attribute of a person. Bina is Understanding. It is the use of Chochmah to understand something. Daas is Knowledge. It is the acquired idea that one has understood with Chochmah through Binah. But this isn't Hebrew.SE! You want a Jewish Theology answer, else you wouldn't have used the term "...


14

From Soncino's intro to Seder Moed: "It might be observed that the designation 'Mo'ed' is in the singular, as distinct from the plural forms used to designate the other Orders, e.g., Nashim, Nezikin, etc. It has been suggested that the singular is here specially used to avoid the confusion that might arise through the employment of the plural Seder Mo'adim (...


14

Based on Footnote 3 of Halachically Speaking Volume 5 Issue 12 (which seems to also be the source of the text in the question): If Mister Jones has two restaurants, one kosher one not-kosher, and I certify the kosher one, I occasionally go into the non-kosher restaurant to make sure that nothing there claims to be certified by me. I never would have ...


14

A FarHer in "Yeshivish" terms means an (usually oral) exam. It is commonly used when referring to the entry exam given to student applicants before accepting them into a Yeshiva. From here: Languages of Origin - Yiddish Etymology פֿאַרהערן farhérn 'to examine'; פֿאַרהער farhér 'interrogation, hearing; audition'


13

Here is every occurrence of the phrase in Tanach: Samuel I 13:19 Kings II 5:2 Kings II 5:4 Kings II 6:23 Ezekiel 27:17 Ezekiel 40:2 Ezekiel 47:18 Chronicles I 22:2 Chronicles II 2:16 Chronicles II 30:25 Chronicles II 34:7


13

The statement of Maimonides to which you refer is from his Yad Hachazaka, Repentence [or: Return] chapter 3. There he writes (in my own loose translation): Everyone has merits and sins. Someone whose merits are more than his sins is a tzadik. Someone whose sins are more than his merits is a rasha. Half and half, he's a benoni [=middle person]. So, ...


13

I'm surprised to read the other answers provided, not to mention the direction of the question leading to those answers. I didn't know what to expect when I clicked on the title, but it wasn't that. I have personally never heard the word in any context other than, simply, "friendly". As in: "This is a Heimish Shul" (not as a denomination, but just ...


13

HaMaor Volume 46 Number 3 Page 26 says that since all the Yomim Tovim are going to be nullified besides Purim when Moshiach comes therefore it is called Moed in singular form as the only Mesechta remaining will be Megila. Otzar Kol Minhagei Yishurin Siman 7 * note says that since the names of the Shisha Sidrei Mishna are based on the Pasuk והיה אמונת עתיך ...


13

No, it does not. "Cursing" someone in a Biblical sense means saying "may G-d strike you." Thus a person would only be liable for cursing their parent if they said "may G-d strike you" to their parent. When someone says "I hit my thumb with this G-ddamn hammer!", an English professor would tell you that means "may G-d damn this hammer because I am mad at it....


13

The term "rabbi" means that the person received semikha (not to be confused with the modern form of semikha which is different). There was no semikha in Bavel, so none of the amoraim who lived there were "rabbi" unless they came to Eretz Yisrael. An easy way to remember this is by looking at the last letter of the word. "Rav" ends with ב which is also the ...


13

According to Wikipedia "Baruch Tehiye" is an acceptable response, but "Chazak Ve'Ematz" is the common one. Among Morrocans it would be "Kulchem Beruchim".


13

Radak in Sefer Hashorashim (page 155 in this copy), explains that it refers to someone who is "young in years", without specifying an age. However, he continues, it can also refer to an attendant (since the young generally serve the elderly), or one who is young in wisdom (i.e. foolish). Thus, there is no definitive age referred to by the word נער, and it ...


12

" my 4-year-old has offhandedly pointed out that "God's not real," or "not a real person."" In response to this exact line of conversation I would suggest the following. Admit to the child that based on how they understand "real", or how you have taught "real" to them in the past, they are correct. Explain to the child that some things are real even if ...


12

The source of this midrash is actually the Talmud in Chagigah 13b -- 14a. The Talmud states: תניא אמר רבי שמעון החסיד אלו תשע מאות ושבעים וארבע דורות שקומטו להיבראות קודם שנברא העולם ולא נבראו עמד הקב"ה ושתלן בכל דור ודור והן הן עזי פנים שבדור which Soncino translates as: It is taught: R. Simeon the Pious said: These are the nine hundred and seventy ...


12

The Torah commands us regarding emotions all the time, e.g.: "Don't bear a grudge", "don't hate your fellow in your heart", "don't harbor resentment when you give [charity] to him", "because you didn't serve Hashem your Lord with happiness and a glad heart", "don't despise the Edomite, for he is your brother; don't despise the Egyptian, for you were a ...


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