Hot answers tagged

7

Yerushalmi Terumot 11:2 states: רבי יוחנן בשם ר"ש בן יוחאי אם יאמר לך אדם שמנה משקין הן אמור לו הרי טל ומים מין אחד הן ומנו אותן חכמים שנים:‏ Rabbi Yochanan [said] in the name of R Shimon ben Yochai: if someone tells you there are 8 liquids [which can cause fruit to be susceptible to impurity], tell him that dew and water which are one thing, yet ...


7

Bzir Aviezer - Rabbi Chaim Aviezer Morgenstern Zatzal explains as follows based on the Gemara in Taanis 10a which says that Hashem gives rain to Eretz Yisrael by himself and other locations through a messenger. Rabbi Yochanan who was in Eretz Yisrael said that rain comes directly from Hashem. Raba who was out of Eretz Yisrael saw the Malach Ridiya who is in ...


7

Rabbeinu Bahya Devarim 11:17: לפעמים המטר יורד מן השמים כלומר ממים העליונים, ולפעמים ממי אוקיאנוס שהן מים תחתונים, ואותו שהוא ממי אוקיאנוס אינו נקרא מטר אלא גשם, מלשון גשמות ודבר גופני, ואותו שהוא ממים העליונים נקרא בשם שניהם בלשון מטר ובלשון גשם‏ [S]ometimes the rain waters originate in the oceans whereas on other occasions they are of celestial ...


6

There is a ma'ala in sitting outside, even if the succah is covered. This is in accordance with the shita of the Rabbeinu Tam on maseches succah 10a SV 'piress'. The Shulchan Aruch (OC 629:19) only brings this down as a yesh omrim, but the MB says to be machmir to sit in the succah (without a brocha), b'shaas ha'd'chak, in other words, if you live in the UK ...


6

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן קלג - הלכות יום הכפורים says: סעיף ח' נְעִילַת הַסַּנְדָּל, יֵשׁ אוֹסְרִין אֲפִלּוּ בְּסַנְדָּל שֶל עֵץ שֶׁאֵינוֹ חָפוּי בְּעוֹר. אֲבָל שֶׁל גֶּמִי אוֹ קַשׁ אוֹ בֶגֶד, מֻתָּר. וְיֵשׁ לְהַחְמִיר בִּנְעִילַת הַסַּנְדָּל אֲפִלוּ בִּמְקוֹם רֶפֶשׁ וְטִיט וּגְשָׁמִים. וַאֲפִלּוּ הוֹלֵךְ בֵּין הַגּוֹיִם, אָסוּר. וְאִם הוּא ...


6

The קרובות for Musaph of Shemini Atzeres is known as a שבעתא and, although many consider the main part to זכור אב (in מנהג פולין) or איום זכור נא (in מנהג אשכנז), the main part was once אף-ברי. This פיוט, written by רבי אלעזר הקליר, was originally split into seven parts (hence, why it is known as a שבעתא). Each part was for a different ברכה in חזרת הש''ץ. ...


6

From Hasofer.com Extremes in temperature, both heat and cold, commonly cause several different types of damage to tefillin: The batim can crack. The paint of the batim and the retzuot, straps, can shatter. Even the ink of the writing can crack or split away from the parchment inside the batim when you're not wearing them, store your tefillin ...


5

According to Devarim 11:13-14 it is a reward from god: יג. וְהָיָה אִם שָׁמֹעַ תִּשְׁמְעוּ אֶל מִצְו‍ֹתַי אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוֶּה אֶתְכֶם הַיּוֹם לְאַהֲבָה אֶת יְהֹוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם וּלְעָבְדוֹ בְּכָל לְבַבְכֶם וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁכֶם: יד. וְנָתַתִּי מְטַר אַרְצְכֶם בְּעִתּוֹ יוֹרֶה וּמַלְקוֹשׁ וְאָסַפְתָּ דְגָנֶךָ וְתִירשְׁךָ וְיִצְהָרֶךָ: (Artscroll) translation: ...


5

I made a sukkah with hard wooden covers like the top of a cardboard box: Either the schach must be wholly within the walls, or the shlak has be affixed to protrusions at each upper corner (yellow) so it covers the entire sukkah. The hinges (yellow) have to be able to rotate 270°. The shlak can be covered with tarp (blue) to improve its water resistance. ...


5

וַיְהִי בָרָד וְאֵשׁ מִתְלַקַּחַת בְּתוֹךְ הַבָּרָד The word בתוך can either mean "inside of", or "among". An example of the former is Genesis (9:21): "And he uncovered himself inside his tent" וַיִּתְגַּל בְּתוֹךְ אָהֳלֹה An example of the latter usage is Genesis (23:10): And Efron sat "inside" (i.e. among) the sons of Ches. וְעֶפְרוֹן יֹשֵׁב ...


5

The Talmud records the following statement in Taanit 2a: אמר ר' יוחנן ג' מפתחות בידו של הקב"ה שלא נמסרו ביד שליח ואלו הן מפתח של גשמים ומפתח של חיה ומפתח של תחיית המתים R. Johanan said: Three keys the Holy One blessed be He has retained in His own hands and not entrusted to the hand of any messenger, namely, the Key of Rain, the Key of Childbirth, and ...


4

The Seforno on Bereishis 9:17 understands the double rainbow as a wakeup call for Noach and his family “to [spiritually] wake up on seeing it, and to awaken the people of the generation to repent, to be wise, and to do good.” The Sages in several places caution against staring at the rainbow, based on a mystical understanding of the rainbow's ...


4

I have never heard of a blessing on either hail or snow. Neither are listed by the Shulchan Aruch OC in the 220's, and according to this answer, absence from that list may well preclude a phenomenon's having its own blessing. In any case, absence from that list is strongly indicative that these phenomena at least don't already have their own traditional ...


4

There is no Bracha on snow since it is only waters that have frozen. (Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky Shlita) Source: http://www.havabooks.co.il/article_ID.asp?id=1300 [ובס' 'הנותן שלג' (עמ' 194), נשאל הגר"ח קניבסקי: אמאי לא תיקנו ברכת הראיה או ברכת השבח על שלג, כשם שתיקנו על ברקים ורעמים, קשת וכיוצ"ב? והשיב: כי אינו אלא מים שנקרשו.]


4

Shu"t Tzitz Eliezer (vol 12 siman 21) writes: אבל גבי ברכת הברק מצינו היפוכו של דבר, דבשום מקום בתלמודין וברמב"ם וטור ושו"ע לא כתוב על זה בלשון הרואה, ומכיון שכן ברור הדבר שלא בעינן בזה שיראה גוף הברק בשמים, וצריך לברך גם כשרואה על הארץ קרני האור של הברק It would appear from this that even if he only saw it in his room he would say the beracha, and not ...


4

I have not built a cover for my sukkah, but I can draw from past experience camping in a yurt. A yurt is designed to support a small fire inside, in the center, for which purpose there is a smoke hole in the top. Because you don't want to get rained on when not burning a fire, the smoke hole has a cover. The best yurt designs have a domed ring in the ...


4

According to Rama 639:7 ("and whoever is exempt from suka and doesn't leave there… that's nothing but laity") as explained by Beur Halacha ("as [the pain of being in the rain] is a violation of yom tov"), if he's going to violate the Rama's injunction and sit in the suka during a rainfall, then I'd say he should sit in the least uncomfortable spot, ...


4

The source of this Halacha is the Mishna (Brachot 9:2) that does not differentiate between comets, earthquakes, lightning, thunder and winds. It's obvious that you only saw the comets and lightning and heard the thunder. You can't touch them. It also doesn't say you have to climb the mountains, swim in the ocean or enter the desert. there too it just says ...


4

Ta’anit 3b אמר רבא מעלי תלגא לטורי כחמשה מטרי לארעא Rava said: Snow is five times as beneficial for the mountains as rain is for the ground. The Gemara doesn’t seem to provide an explanation as to why this should be true (apart from sourcing this idea from a drasha) but maybe it’s for the reason you suggest.


4

According to at least one opinion, yes it is though I don't know exactly how seriously to take this source. What is the earliest time you can make a bracha on your talis/tzitzis? Of course, the zman is Misheyakir, as in OC 18, when you can discern between undyed wool and tcheiles, or when you can recognize a casual acquaintance from a few feet away. When ...


3

From your assessment about the impracticality of observing and experimenting it seems your understanding of ruach meyzuyah is a wind that under normal circumstances can and might eventually blow, I would suggest that this is not the case. Rather, Ruach metzuyah means a wind that does blow. Practically constantly. First of all is the Mechaber in hilchos ...


3

Romamos Kel - Alshich on Sefer Tehilim says that the noise of the Barad were noises from the Olam Ruchni, out of this world. Thus the lack of lightning was not an additional miracle as the thunder was not regular thunder.


3

If you wear a hat, you can use a Shayne Coat, which will cover your clothes and your hat. (there are also shtreimel models of the coat)


3

Ran in his drashos (end of drasha 11) explains that if the Egyptians had realised that there was a miracle going on, they wouldn't have thrown themselves into the sea. This is because the miracle was clearly going to end badly for them. If the splitting was natural, there is no reason to believe that the sea would stay split for the Jews but come crashing ...


3

I have a hard time imagining a situation in which you're being forced to evacuate but there isn't some recognizable threat to life. As A.L. said, in the case of pikuach nefesh, you are clearly allowed to do anything to save yourself or someone else, even travelling outside the techum shabbos. If they is something that would be a pikuach nefesh, but there ...


3

Mishneh Torah Hilkhot Nizqei Mamon 13:18[19] (and Shulchan Arukh Choshen Mishpat 416) says (in Eliyahu Touger's translation): When a wall or a tree falls into the public domain and causes damage, the owner is not required to compensate [for the damages]. [This applies] even when he declared [the tree or the wall] ownerless. [The rationale is that these ...


3

Rabbi Moshe Isserles (Rema) lived most of his life in Krakow, Poland. Rabbi Mordechai ben Hillel Hakohein (whose explanation Rema rejected) lived at the end of his life in Nuremberg, Germany where he was murdered in a pogrom. Sukkot always falls in September or October. The following data is from www.weatherbase.com (degrees Fahrenheit): September: ...


3

I once left my tefillin in my car in the middle of the Summer. I frantically took them to a sofer in Baltimore to get checked. He was very amused at my being worried. He told me that it is much worse to leave them in the cold than in the heat, but that neither are much to worry about with the quality of today's tefillin. (I had him check them anyways, ...


3

I think the common Midrashic interpretation was that each hailstone had fire within it. (That's the way it's illustrated when taught to kids.) Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan translates instead as "hailstorm", and one other tweak: "fire" means lightning. We thus have a phenomenon that ever-so-slightly bends the laws of nature, rather than breaks them: With lightning ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible