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The Encyclopedia of Jewish Prayer: The Ashkenazic and Sephardic Rites (Macy Nulman) has the following on the beating of the heart during Viduy When saying Ashamnu we stand somewhat bent over, without leaning on any kind of support, just as in reciting Modim (MB, 607:10 ; Magen Avraham 607:4), a position of abject humility and contrition. One should ...


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The phrase, "חפש כל חדרי בטן" comes from Proverbs 20:27: נר ה' נשמת אדם חפש כל חדרי בטן "The spirit of man is the lamp of the LORD, searching all the inward parts." (JPS 1917) The word, בטן, is often used simply to mean "belly" (and is therefore associated with pregnancy), but in this context it means the innermost aspects of ...


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Rabbeinu Yonah in Shaar Teshuva lists 20 principles of Teshuvah, interestingly the last principle he lists is dettering the public from sin, to the extent one is able to do so. להשיב רבים מעון כאשר תשיג ידו Rabbeinu Yonah notes that basic teshuvah has three main components as noted in this other answer, what he adds though is that teshuvah is not just a ...


5

The Rambam answers this in Hilchot Tshuva: there are three stages Confession Regret and commitment not to sin again Not transgressing when facing the same situation again (some say there are four steps and separate the first between acknowledging the sin and confession) (1:1) - Confession If a person transgresses any of the mitzvot of the Torah, ...


4

This is impossible to answer since we do not know where you daven or what kind of speed they daven at. My experience has been that in shuls that are "frummer" i.e. higher percentages of people who are serious about Torah and mitzvos, people take longer to daven, especially on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. Where I daven the silent prayer on Rosh Hashana can ...


4

"מחזור המפורש" (Gefen, Jerusalem 5772 Ashkenaz) explains (a few times, but see page לה) that this confession means that we have lead others astray. תעינו מן הדרך הישרה, והתינו אחרים ממנה. ‏ In a footnote there (טו), they cite another explanation: עשינו מעשי תעתועים ומרמה. ‏ Both of these explanations are confessions, and not accusations.


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Firstly, Seder Rav Amram Gaon (Seder Sheini Vechamishi, page 9) only has תעבנו and תעתענו, so in that version (which is fairly authoritative) it is only doubled and not tripled. Also, in the sefer Ohel Moed (late 1300s, Shaar Reishis Chochmah Derech 8), it contains only תעינו and תעתענו, and includes a second ל word, לוצצנו. See here for a number of ...


3

In several places, pesukim say בַּסֵּתֶר, or at the end of a sentence בַּסָּתֶר, to mean "in private". Examples are Devarim 13:7 and 27:15. (Sometimes it's connected to the next word, like Shir Hashirim 2:14, and in those cases it's with a sheva. But that means more like "in the privacy of" so it's grammatically not comparable to viduy.) I don't see גלוי ...


3

R' Nachman could have been inclined to the Raavad's opinion that sins committed against God may be publicized so the person experiences humiliation. (See Lechem Mishneh Teshuvah 2:5 justifying the opinion of Raavad.) Possibly more in line with R' Nachman's description of confessing to a rabbi is the instruction of Sefer Hasidim (§21) that that which the ...


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As shared with us earlier today by Rabbi Joseph B. Meszler:


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Rambam lists confession as an aspect of t'shuva (Yad, T'shuva chapter 2) and possibly of independent value (chapter 1). He notes that t'shuva is insufficient for interpersonal sins and one must appease the wronged person (end of chapter 2) — but that doesn't mean it's unnecessary! (Note also that Rambam's wording "neither t'shuva nor Yom Kipur atone, ...


3

According to Wikipedia, The last two sins (repetitions of the letter תּ) are "תָּעִינוּ תִּעְתָּעְנוּ" (taw'inu, titawnu) are usually translated as: "We went astray, We led others astray". Occasionally the last word is translated as "You (= the Deity) allowed us to go astray"—the widely used ArtScroll Siddur uses both ...


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Sha'arei Teshuvah (300:1) writes in the name of the Arizal that it is forbidden to say viduy on motzaei shabbos until after chatzos. Chesed La'alafim (131:8) writes the same.


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Praying does not require speed - it requires Kavana - focus, concentration and meaning. I'm not sure why you should feel embarrassed in any way. Contrarily, if the majority finishes a long time before you, it could mean that they were speeding and had no or minimal kavanah. Besides, on Yom Kippur, you have an entire day to be in shul. Where are you and ...


2

This is really a question on a specific translation/interpretation of the word. The OU published an explanatory translation of Viduy. On this translation they comment: You have let us go astray (we lost the merit to benefit from Your help); This reminds me of the statement in the Talmud (several places, including Yoma 38b): בא לטמא פותחין לו One who ...


2

Many acrostic piyutim interchange ס with שׂ because of their sound being the same. I suppose it is because the author could not find a fitting word that began with ס. One example of this would be in the prayer "L'chai Olamim", in which the line for ס goes: .הַסִּגּוּי וְהַשֶּֽׂגֶב לְחַי עוֹלָמִים Also in the prayer "Kel Adon" on ...


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Rabbeinu Yona in chapter 4 explains that after getting the mechila you still need vidduy, but that vidduy prior to getting forgiveness doesn’t work ואמרו רבותינו זכרונם לברכה מכל חטאתיכם לפני ה' תטהרו עבירות שבין אדם למקום יום הכפורים מכפר. עברות שבין אדם לחברו אין יום הכפורים מכפר עד שירצה את חברו. לכן מי שגזל את חברו. ישיב את הגזלה ואחרי כן יתודה. ואם ...


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I suggest that one of the blessings of the weekday Amidah (page 120) covers confession without the need to say Tachanun: Forgive us, O our Father, for we have sinned; pardon us, O our King, for we have transgressed; for thou dost pardon and forgive. Blessed art thou, O L-rd, who art gracious, and dost abundantly forgive. This covers the general ...


1

Probably a more useful and more specific source is the first Perek of Maseches Shevuos which deals with a massive argument amongst the Tannaim as to which karbanos atone for which sins exactly.


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It sounds like what you are looking for is all found in the ten chapters of Mishnah Torah, Hilchot Teshuvah. It seems to cover everything you are inquiring about in the last paragraph of your question. In particular, the first three chapters deal with the different elements of Yom Kippur and the different categories of sin.


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The following nusach ashkenaz siddurim have vidui as the first item in the bedtime shema: Siddur Otzar Hatefillos The Koren Sacks siddur Siddur Rinas Yisrael p 189 Artscroll Siddur so that seems to be a good place.


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The "Viduy-Hamashlim" was writen by my. Binyamin holtzman, Rav Kibutz Ma'ale gilbo'a. את "הוידוי המשלים" אני כתבתי. בנימין הולצמן, רב קיבוץ מעלה גלבוע look for בנימין הולצמן at facebook


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The Mechaber says (507:3) that one should stand for Vidui, and the Rama there adds that the main part of Vidui is the phrase "אבל אנחנו חטאנו" "...but we have sinned". So it seems that this is the minimal requirement for bending. See Mishnah Brurah commentary 12 that states that even though you should say all the paragraphs standing, it is suggested to bend ...


1

I've heard of a case where somebody in a coma was aware of things happening around him, but couldn't respond in any way. This person eventually recovered and thanked the chaplain for sending someone to read the Megillah for him on Purim. Other people saying the viduy probably does nothing by itself, but if the patient can hear and say it together with them ...


1

"Better a small number of prayers with concentration, than many without concentration." (Shulchan Aruch OH 1:4) "If... one estimates that he will not be able to concentrate for a large number of prayers, and [therefore] says only a few but with concentration, Hashem considers it as if he... said many prayers with concentration" (Mishna Brurah there) In ...


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I heard it is related to ס being the first letter of ס"מ (the evil inclination) and we don't mention that letter (sources needed). However, earlier in אשמנו בגדנו it does appear as סררנו. It seems that the reasons stay and the author of אשמנו בגדנו did not hold of that. Many offer an easier solution of similar pronunciation, but I'd say anyone who knows ...


1

Many acrostic piyutim interchange ס with שׂ because of their sound being the same. I suppose it is because the author could not find a fitting word that began with ס. One example of this would be in the prayer "L'chai Olamim", in which the line for ס goes: .הַסִּגּוּי וְהַשֶּֽׂגֶב לְחַי עוֹלָמִים Also in the prayer "Kel Adon" on Shabbat, the line for ס ...


1

On Yom Kippur itself it is said 8 times: [in parentheses I have placed the page numbers from the Artscroll Machzor Zichron Yosef] In the amida for ma'ariv (94) Slichot after the amida in ma'ariv (132) Silent shacharit amida (360) Chazarat hashatz for shacharit (422) Silent musaf amida (496) Chazarat hashatz for musaf (600) Silent mincha amida (660) Chazarat ...


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