12

Where the product is made directly from the whole vegetable as with Kellogg's corn flakes the brocho is Hoadomoh. Where the vegetable has been mashed and reconsituted the brocho is shehakol. (see p 31 of the Handbook for the Halochos of Brochos). You can see this from the different brocho for Kellogg's and Kemach corn flakes at Star-K online and the brocho ...


9

A straightforward answer is provided by the Meiri (Beis HaB'chira, B'rachos 35a) and echoed by the Shita M'kubeztes (Brachos 35a), who write that the phrasing for each is based on verses pertaining to each (as mentioned in Michoel's answer and in Shalom's answer). Further, the Meiri indicates that borei p'ri ha'adama would also be suitable for bread, ...


8

Dose of Halacha explains: The Gemara (Nidda 17a) writes that it is dangerous to leave peeled garlic, onion or egg overnight due to ruach ra’ah, evil spirit. This halacha only applies if the entire onion, garlic or egg is peeled. However, if part of it remains unpeeled, or if it has already been mixed with any other food, it may be eaten (Kaf Hachaim ...


7

The Shita Mekubetzes to Brochos 35a ask this, and explains that the choice of wording for the two blessings is in accordance with phrases found previously in Tanach - the blessing for bread is based on the verse (Tehillim 104:14) "להוציא לחם מן הארץ", whereas the blessing for vegetables comes from the verse (Devarim 26:2) "מראשית כל פרי האדמה".


7

Gemara Eiruvin 40B: Rav Yehuda would say shehecheyanu on a new gourd. A gourd would have the brachah of borei pri ha'adamah. Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 225:6 says that it should be a fruit that is new once (or twice - Rema) a year. Otherwise, the fruit's blessing is not a criteria. In fact, the Rema there allows a shehecheyanu blessing on a new vegetable ...


6

Shulchan Aruch HaRav O.C. 158:3 paskens that any food normally eaten without using ones hands directly does not require washing of hands without a Bracha. Salad, as far as I know, is eaten with cutlery, so it would not require washing according to that.


6

The manure is completely broken down and absorbed by the soil. An analogy can be made using the difference between honey and milk. Manure is actually that which is rejected by the non-kosher animal. It is not created in the animal's body. As a result, it is considered as external chemical that have been separated from the food that the animal ate, broken ...


6

If your potato skins being plain means that they are not cooked, then they are shehakol - Berachos 38b - anything which is normally eaten cooked, if eaten raw is shehakol. Potatoes are normally eaten cooked. If they are cooked, then they would be ha'adama, as potato skins are normal to eat along with the potatoes (as opposed to many fruit peels which are ...


6

There are problems with food from a vegan restaurant. See this Chabad site A vegan restaurant would not have a hard time getting kosher certification. However, as long as there is no such certification one should not eat there. There are many reasons why a strictly vegan establishment requires kosher certification. Here are a few of them: ...


6

You should CYLOR for a final ruling, but it seems (Shach and Taz to YD 84:13, Chochmat Adam 52:9, see also Rama OC 553:3 (however see Shu"t R Akiva Eiger 76)) there should be no problem blending the fruit as the intention is to prepare the food not to nullify the insects. Once the insects are cut up, they are nullified in the mixture (YD 101:6). ...


6

Here is an answer from Rabbi Eli Gersten from a previous issue of Jewish Action (OU): If your co-workers bought a fruit platter from a supermarket, you may partake of the fruit since you can assume the supermarket has a dedicated knife for fruit platters. Additionally, due to the sheer volume of fruit cut at one time in such a scenario, we regard ...


5

This depends on the Hashgacha. Some Hashgachot on broccoli are only signing off on the purposefully present ingredients and processing equipment, but are not addressing the requirement for Bedika (Triangle-K for example on a lot of frozen produce (See here)). Others are signing off that they indeed already performed a Bedika (typically via Chazaka) and ...


5

Rabbi Ribiat discusses this in his sefer (The 39 Melochos), starting on page 333 (vol. 2). There are some fruits that are biblically forbidden, some that are rabbinically forbidden, and some that are allowed to be squeezed for juice. The biblically forbidden fruits are grapes and olives, because they are "distinguished especially for their juice." ...


5

The source for this is a Gemara in Berachos, 39a: אמר רב פפא פשיטא לי מיא דסלקא כסלקא ומיא דלפתא כלפתא ומיא דכולהו שלקי ככולהו שלקי Rav Pappa said "It is evident that beet-liquid is like a beet, radish liquid is like a radish, and liquid of all boiled (produce) is like the produce" There are several interpretations of the Rishonim as to the ...


5

Mefarshim here: Q1) Shadal there (it's a really long piece, worth reading in its entirety) opposes your understanding, as he notes the opinion that animals were prohibited from eating fruit, and disagrees, noting: ‫ ואין להוציא מזה כדעת Grotius שנאסר פרי העץ לב״ח ‬ Ralbag also says clearly that fruit was included in "Yerek Esev", as do ...


4

What you describe is documented in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן נג - דין רטב ומשקה של פרות וירקות: סעיף ב': פֵּרוֹת שֶׁאֵין דַּרְכָּן לְבִשּׁוּל אֶלָּא לְאָכְלָן חַיִּין, אִם בִּשְּׁלָן, מְבָרֵךְ עַל הָרֹטֶב שֶׁהַכֹּל. אֲבָל פֵּרוֹת שֶׁדַּרְכָּן לְיַבְּשָׁן וּלְבַשְּׁלָן וְהֵן שְׁכִיחִים לָרֹב וְנָטְעֵי לְהוּ אַדַּעְתָּא דְּהָכִי, אִם בִּשְּׁלָן ...


4

People I know asked Reb Moshe Feinstein about instant potatoes and he said Ha'adama. His reasoning was that it still lookes like potatoes. Most chassidishe hechsheirim, who print their opinions on the packaging, say to make a shehakol.


4

According to this site, the bracha is ha'adama, no matter what: "There are some fruits and vegetables which even after a thorough mashing are recognizable due to their unique texture. The examples I know for sure are bananas, eggplant, and potatoes. Therefore, finely mashed potatoes are nevertheless Ha’adoma."


4

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he ...


4

According to the cRc of Chicago, iceberg lettuce that is prewashed may be used without hashgacha and without any further washing. But the cRc adds: "It ... still ... can (and must) be checked with a chazaka check."


3

Ginger is a davar charif as you suspected. This is found in Chayei Adam klal 49 siff 4, subsequently brought in Maadanei HaShulchan 96 2 s.v. 38. As far as the heter of cutting many sharp foods in a row, that is found in the Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 96 siff 4 with the explanation of the Ramma. However there are varying degrees on relying on this opinion, ...


2

Chazal do not give a definitive answer to this question. Rishonim do start to discuss it (see above comments, which cite Tos. Pesachim 114b, 115a, credit to Fred and DoubleAA), and I present the opinions of two recent Rabbis that provide summaries of why we do use Haadamah vegetables. According to Rav Eliezer Melamed here (see fn 15, h/t to Gershon) the ...


2

As a contrast to the manna, which was described as "lechem min hashamayim." "Shamayim" goes with "aretz." Not to mention that's how the verse in Psalms (Borchi Nafshi, like we say after davening on Rosh Chodesh) has it -- lehotzee lechem min ha'aretz.


2

Shulchan Aruch 202:16 reads: On dried pepper and ginger… and anything that, like them, is not eaten except in a mixture, one says no b'racha at all. However, this seems not to be quite as broad in practice as it sounds. Mishna B'rura :79, for example, notes that the no-b'racha on dried pepper and ginger is because "there's no pleasure from them at ...


2

The rules of berachos are dependent on the time and place. For example, in earlier times the bracha on carrots was shehakol since they were not eaten raw, whereas today their bracha is ha'adamah since they are eaten raw. Poskim in each generation evaluate the prevalent eating habits in their locale and issue a ruling accordingly. (Mishne Berurah 208: 18 ...


2

I actually had lunch with a mashgiach over Shabbos. I can't cite all of his sources, but we actually discussed this and he told me the following: Because of environmental and health concerns, the pesticides we use are much more benign than those used as little as 25 years ago. We have infestations that would be simple to get rid of, but we don't. Because ...


2

The reason "Daver Shalem" gets priority can be for one of two reasons 1) The food item was created that way ("ברייה") an example could be a apple or even a grape. 2) That by taking the "Daver Shalem" before the other item you are beautifying the mitzvah of making a bracha (Hidur Mitzvah) Thus if you had a large slice of bread and a small roll you would ...


2

Maharil (Minhagim Order of the Haggada 16) writes: הקשה מהר"י סג"ל הא דאמרינן טיבול ראשון למען ישאלו תינוקות, וכששואל מה נשתנה וכו', היאך משיבין לו עבדים היינו והא הטיבול אתא בשביל הנס. ואמר שנראה לו דהכי פי' דאנחנו מדמינן את עצמנו כבני חורין מפני הנס. ועוד טיבול ראשון אתא לגרר לבו לאכול מצה לתיאבון. ואמר מהר"י סג"ל שבנימוקי רבינו שמחה כתב דכך שואל התינוק,...


2

Shmiras Shabbos K’hilchasa (3:35 and note 97): He brings down that it is mutar to remove the stems from tomatoes, plums, apples, pears, peaches, and cherries as long as this is done for immediate use. He brings down two possible rationales for this. a) The stem is just like a peel that is preventing you from eating the entire fruit. According to this ...


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