18

When the word stands on its own, with its own trup-mark, it's אֵת, with a tzeireh. When it's attached to the next word with a dash and therefore does not have its own trup-mark, it's אֶת, with a segol. I think I learned this in high school; unfortunately, I don't know a more precise source. I'm not sure what would be the underlying reason behind some ...


13

The word is אֵת. When the word is "joined" with the next word with a makaf "־" then they become treated as one long word, and there is no longer an accent on that syllable. Unaccented closed syllables (unlike accented closed syllables) take short vowels, so the vowel shifts to its shorter counterpart: tzere -> segol. You can also see this same phenomenon in ...


10

This question is addressed by several Acharonim. R. Pinchas Horowitz says that during the 7 days of inauguration Moshe did not erect the Mishkan by himself. Since multiple people did the act together it was not a violation of Shabbat labor. Panim Yafos Parshas Naso ונראה דהקמת כל שבעה ימים לא היה ע"י משה עצמו כמו כל מלאכת המשכן שנעשה ע"י אחרים ונקרא ע"...


10

Rashi in his commentary to Devarim 10:1 writes that there were indeed two; the one made by Moshe was the one that the Bnei Yisrael carried with them when they went into battle. At that time: At the end of forty days [which was the first of Elul], God was reconciled with me and said to me, “Hew for yourself [two tablets],” and afterwards, “make for ...


9

While the Karaites interpreted this verse to mean that no flames may be burning on the Sabbath at all, the traditional Rabbinic interpretation (see Mechilta 35:3) is that fire may burn on the Sabbath so long as it was lit beforehand. No fuel may be ignited on the Sabbath (including, for example, pouring more oil into a burning lamp). (See at length Ibn Ezra'...


6

Ralbag at the end of Sefer Shemos gives several thoughts as to why the Torah repeats the details of the vessels in the account of the mishkan's construction. The possibilities he considers are: People at that time told stories like this in a repetitive fashion, and the Torah is merely immitating the expository style of the time. There are plenty of sections ...


5

The Spoken Law recorded in the Talmud gives many more details of prohibited labor on the Sabbath than what you'd see in a strict literal reading of the verse. Moses commands the people to keep the Sabbath, and then to build the Tabernacle. The Talmud concludes that any act of physical creation used to build the Tabernacle is prohibited "work" on the Sabbath. ...


5

במראות (bemar'ot), while it can refer to a vision, also means mirrors -- it is the plural form of the word מראה (mar'ah) -- See Wiktionary's definition. The word הצבאות (hatzov'ot) is a bit ambiguous. Note that not everyone translates it as "enlisted ones" in Bamidbar -- for example, here's Mechon Mamre's translation there: from thirty years old and ...


5

Six additional answers: The Chasam Sofer (Toras Moshe, Vayakhel) explains that Moshe did not really construct the Mishkan by himself; it just looked like he was building it but in reality it was constructed by divine intervention (see Rashi on Shmos 40:18). The Tchebiner Rav (Dovev Meisharim 1:63) writes that since it was only constructed for that day, ...


4

From myjewishlearning.com According to the Mishnah (Sanhedrin 1:4) the death penalty could only be inflicted, after trial, by a court composed of twenty-three judges and there were four types of death penalties (Sanhedrin 7:1): stoning, burning, slaying (by the sword), and strangling. A bare reading of these and the other accounts in the tractate would ...


3

Sifsei Chachamim (s.k. 4) indeed seems to answer your question. His question is that perhaps it's the opposite - it wrote it twice to say that it's the Mishkan that overrides Shabbos! He answers that whatever comes first is what is primary. In Vayakhel, where it comes first, it's to teach that Shabbos comes before Mishkan. In Ki Sisa, where HaShem told ...


3

Darash Moshe in parshas Terumah. 25 8 reads into the psukim there that at the time of collection, Bnei Yisroel were not aware of what the purpose of their donations were for. In this way, their donations were a complete submission to Hashem and recognition of His true ownership of all they owned, as opposed to donating for a given purpose which would have ...


2

According to Binyamin Efrati in his book Sh'ma B'ni, A Treasury of Stories and Lessons from the Weekly Parshah. He says that Hashem chose Betzalel and Oholiav to work on the Mishkan, saying Betzalel made (Perek Lamed Zayin Pasuk Aleph/ Chapter 31 Verse 1). Rashi says that it was because he dedicated himself to the work more than anyone else. Oholiav was ...


2

Ibn Ezra writes (to Shmos 31:6): ובלב כל חכם לב. לעשות מלאכה כי גם זה ימצא בתולדת האדם שיוציא מלבו דברים עמוקים במלאכת המדות והוא לא למד החכמה and all the wise hearted into whose hearts I have instilled wisdom -- to do work; for we find a similar thing among people, who know how to do complicated (lit. deep) things, even as they have not learned that ...


2

I've noticed that a general pattern to many of the differences between Terumah and Vayakhel is that Terumah has a more precise account of the relationship between different parts or descriptions of the Mishkan. I think this indicates a difference between Hashem's understanding of the Mishkan and a human understanding. Betzalel and his workers created the ...


2

I would suggest the following Chiddush, but I welcome feedback as usual. The prohibition of removing the Badim immediately follows in Shemos 25, but not in Shemos 37. I would like to suggest that the word "Bahem" was only present in Shemos 25:14 in order to emphasize that they must be what the Aron is carried with and therefore they may never be removed. ...


2

The root (בער) as listed in Jastrow has several different meanings depending on the context. For example, (בער) meaning to burn is found in Shemot Rabbah 2:5 which says, "since the bush burned..." http://www.sefaria.org/Shemot_Rabbah.2.5/he/Daat_Shemot_Rabbah?qh=הסנה%2Bבוער&lang=he&layout=lines&sidebarLang=all And in Bamidbar Rabbah, parshat ...


2

Rav Hirsch, in his commentary on Pekudei 39:1 states that the individual garments were commanded separately and were considered complete as soon as they were finished and ready to be worn. The mishkan and its utensils, such as the curtains, etc, could only be considered done after the entire mishkan was assembled. כאשר צוה ה וגו, it says this when ...


1

Rashi comments and says that it refers to the women who would crowd at the entrance to bring their contributions to the building of the Mishkan. He also mentions some interesting things about the bronze mirrors mentioned in the same passuk. You can see the whole Rashi here.


1

As noted in Jay's answer, Rashi on 35:2 comments that shabbat is placed first in Vayakhel to teach that shabbat takes precedence over building the mishkan. However, we then have to ask explain why the order is different in Ki Tissa. The Meshech Chochmah (R. Meir Simcha of Dvinsk) asks this question. He offers an answer (more b'derech drush in my opinion) ...


1

It's not teaching the same thing twice. The verse in Chapter 31 is where God spoke to Moses in such a way that Moses could infer that Shabbat supercedes Mishkan. The verse in Chapter 35 is where Moses told the people the laws in a certain order to teach them that Shabbat supercedes Mishkan. If we only had the second instance we would not know how Moses knew ...


1

[This doesn't directly address your specific example, but it is perhaps a general answer to these types of questions. I imagine that those who did not like this answer might also not like this one.] In Parshas Terumah (26:8-9) we have the following verses: אֹרֶךְ הַיְרִיעָה הָאַחַת שְׁלֹשִׁים בָּאַמָּה וְרֹחַב אַרְבַּע בָּאַמָּה הַיְרִיעָה הָאֶחָת ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible