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There is a wide variety out there. I'd recommend Googling some synagogues that you might visit post-pandemic, and often there are photos there of its members. That should give you some sense. If you can arrange a socially-distanced outdoors chat with a woman in a prospective community, that could be incredibly helpful. As Alex commented, there's a wide ...


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Well, for starters black matches with everything so its the easiest color to wear.


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The Talmud (Avoda Zara 20a) prohibits intentionally gazing at any woman; even if the gazing is only in order to appreciate her beauty. This is codified in the Ramabam (Issurei Bi'ah 21:2): והמסתכל אפילו באצבע קטנה של אשה ונתכוון להנות כמי שנסתכל במקום התורף Someone who gazes at even a woman's small finger, and intends to derive pleasure from it, is ...


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From @RebbecaBurns answer to this question: Black is always elegant. Always. Simple is best. It is important to remember that the purpose of tznius is not to be ugly or unattractive, but to not stand out or draw attention the eye to one's physique. (This applies to men too.) So a color that is slimming can actually be beneficial for tznius.


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Dinonline speaks about knees here The principle halachah is that the thigh must be covered, up to and including the knee. This is the ruling given by the Mishnah Berurah (75:2), and many follow his ruling. In a practical sense, the skirt must several centimeters lower than the knee, to ensure that it is covered at all times. However, many authorities (...


1

In describing his stay in the city of Messina, R. Ovadia of Bartenura writes as follows: וראיתי בחופה שנעשתה בהיותי שמה שהוציאו את הכלה אחרי ברכו שבע ברכות והרכיבוה על הסוס ברחוב העיר וכל הקהל עוברים לפני' ברגליהם והחתן באמצע הזקנים ולפני הכלה אשר היא לבדה על הסוס At a wedding which took pace near my residence I witnessed the following ceremony. After the ...


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Before one can work out what is considered okay to wear, one needs to be aware of what is incorrect. The famous posek, Rav Pesach Eliyahu Falk zt"l wrote an English sefer called 'Oz Ve-hadar Levusha: Modesty an Adornment for Life' published by Feldheim. He features a whole chapter that deals with sheitels and the potential issues to watch out for (with ...


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In regards to question C, the Ben Yohada on that Gemara states that we would indeed learn the bad behavior as well, which is exactly why we needed to have the Torah and not leave it with just the animal kingdom: אִלְמָלֵי לֹא נִתְּנָה תּוֹרָה לְיִשְׂרָאֵל, לָמַדְנוּ צְנִיעוּת מֵחָתוּל וְכוּ'. הנה מלשון זה יש לדייק דעכשיו דנתנה תורה אין לנו ללמוד מאלו, וקשה ...


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This article asks your very question and answers There is a dispute among the poskim if Hamapil should be said before Shema or just before going to sleep. However, all agree it should be as close as possible. The Mishna Brura (Orach Chaim 239) says that if one is concerned he may fall asleep before saying Hamapil, it should be said before Shema and if one ...


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Just to add what has not yet been mentioned: Bereishis Rabbah 70:12 likewise mentions the three types of kisses that don't come under the banner of 'tiflus' like the Midrash Tanchuma mentioned above, and adds that there is a fourth type - that of a kiss to a relative: רַבִּי תַּנְחוּמָא אָמַר אַף נְשִׁיקָה שֶׁל קְרֵיבוּת, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר: וַיִּשַּׁק יַעֲקֹב ...


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First of all black matches with everything. Second of all, if you have many kids or siblings it's most natural to get your clothes dirty and black covers most of that up. For some people black is a sign that you are elegant and sophisticated. In extreme communities such as the Lev Tahor Jews, wearing all black is modest. This is not true, wearing bright-...


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