45

The Rema writes in the first Halacha of Shulchan Aruch (Partial Quote) וְלֹא יִתְבַּיֵּשׁ מִפְּנֵי בְּנֵי אָדָם הַמַּלְעִיגִים עָלָיו בַּעֲבוֹדַת ה' יִתְבָּרַךְ גַּם בְּהֶצְנֵעַ לֶכֶת. And one should not be ashamed because of people who mock him in his service of God, and should also go modestly. Whatever decision you come to, I feel like this is ...


40

There is not such a thing as "too orthodox", no. There can be such a thing as "too pushy" when people are too direct in trying to change others, but that's not the situation you've described. Never feel guilty about following halacha for yourself. There can also be such a thing as "unfamiliar and thus different". The only synagogue in town is the only ...


15

You might be a source of inspiration for others that want to be more observant. Keep going.


13

If you find that your questions are not being received as they were intended and they were asked with the proper deference (כבוד רבך ככבוד שמים), perhaps you need to ask your question of authorities who are willing to address it, or are comfortable saying they don't know the answer - but may research it. Or, you can ask your question here where you have a ...


13

Among those Rabbis that I know, if/when they are approached by someone who wasn't raised as a Jew but has a Jewish maternal grandparent, they welcome them with open arms as Jews, albeit Jews who have been estranged from their own religion. I have known this to have occurred on multiple occasions (although I was never personally involved in any). It may be ...


10

Sounds like you have a very complicated situation. This may be a job for a therapist. Again, concepts of "sanctuary for repentance" don't really fit with the vocabulary of Judaism. But for theory's sake: at your average Orthodox Union synagogue, if someone shows up and says "I wasn't raised observant, I was previously married to someone not Jewish and now ...


10

No, the rabbi wouldn't find it strange. & Yes, he would accepted you at the spot as 100% jewish. And I can tell you from my own personal experience they would be even very happy!


10

Orach Chaim 104:7 & Aruch Hahulchan 104:13 say that one who is in middle of Shemona Esrei when the Chazan reaches Kedusha should remain quiet and listen to the Chazan recite the Kedusha and it is as if he responded.


9

The rule of thumb Rabbi Moshe Feinstein applies is to not be disruptive. In communities where it is clearly the standard practice that all men wear tallitot, I would think that doing otherwise would be disruptive and/or disrespectful. (And what's the downside, really?) As for what text you yourself use, as long as you're not too loud, generally people aren'...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


8

Rambam is explicit and passionate on this topic (Hilchot Talmud Torah 3:10) . . . NO!!!!: "Anyone who decides to be engaged in Torah [study] and not to work, and will be supported by Tzedaqa - this person desecrates God's name (Chillel et Hashem), degrades the Torah, extinguishes the light of our faith, brings evil upon himself and forfeits life in Olam ...


8

Some options: JCCs (Jewish Community Centers) -- these have a wide variety of things going on, everything from lectures to social events to fitness classes; see if there's one where you live. Find the local Jewish newspaper or community web site, which is likely to advertise non-religious events along with the religious ones. My local newspaper announces/...


8

Regarding part A of the question, the Beis Yosef in Orech Chaim 102 s.v. כתב cites the Mahari Abuhav as saying that one needs to wait even if the person behind them started after them. As far as the people in front of you (the person waiting), R' Shlomo Zalman Aurbach (Halichos Shlomo Hilchos Tefillah ch. 8 os 47) writes that the shechina is still "present" ...


8

The word "Orthodox" is ambiguous. Technically, it is a sociological grouping. Because in practice, that group is of people trying to observe classical notions of halakhah, we think of "Orthodox" as the set of Torah observant people, or sometimes, the community / communities of Torah observant people. (There is a gap there I want to point out: There is more ...


8

The original method (dating back to the Tosefta Berakhot 1:11) which was uniformly practiced in all locations (Ashkenaz, Poland, Spain, North Africa, Yemen, Italy, etc.) is simply the leader recites the entire paragraph out loud and the congregation says the verses from Tanakh along with him (eg. "Kadosh...Kevodo"). This is the version endorsed by ...


7

The Magen Avraham in Shuchan Aruch siman 53:4 says that an individual who reaches Yishtabach should say it right away.


7

Mishchas Shemen volume 2:123 asks this exact question. He concludes that he has to Daven Maariv again.


6

Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe YD 4:61:4) ruled they should not split up because of BeRov Am, and all the more so in a case where the extra group would not be in a Shul or even a room without a Torah scroll. Rav Chaim Kanievsky (Gam Ani Odekha (Shonim) 3:34) says it is better in your situation not to split up into multiple Minyanim. Rav Yehuda Herzl ...


6

There doesn't seem to be that much online, but you probably could find collaborators on this site for potential projects. Below are some Torah projects on Github, they might be open to contributions: Zmanim opensiddur PocketTorah TorahOhr Open-Talmud The Sefaria project looks especially interesting: Torah Texts Interface Torah Texts Data


6

Take a look at this page. This is the summary: In conclusion, you do not recite: Kaddish. Barchu. The additional prayers recited during the chazzan's repetition of the amidah. G d's attributes of mercy. Any of the prayers that are associated with the reading of the Torah. Other than the above mentioned prayers, you can recite ...


6

The way in which The asker claims to have been answered is certainly questionable. I think it depends on who is being asked. With people in general, it probably stems from humans being human. They live by the words of the challenged authority. Their choice of life stye is thus affronted and personally attacked, (in their minds). The appropriate response ...


6

No. You do not have to worry about Marit Ayin. Marit Ayin is when a Jew does something technically permitted, but may cause someone to reason that a different activity is permitted, when in fact, it is forbidden. The classic example of this is hanging wet laundry to dry on shabbat. (Talmud Bavli, Shabbat 146b) Technically, if you washed clothes on Friday,...


6

I was in a similar situation a decade ago. The Rabbi of the orthodox shul looked into my background and accepted me and made me feel welcome. You never know where such things lead and I'm now on the shul's board and am an assistant gabbai. You're halachically Jewish and will be recognised as such. What you do with that is up to you.


6

Rama discusses a similar situation in ShA OC 54:3 where, after reciting Yishtabach, the congregation halted the prayer service for specific Mitzva/communal needs. He recommends in that case for the Chazzan to recite "some verses from Pesukei Dizimra" and say Kaddish "on them". (It seems to me that his specification of "from Pesukei Dizimra" is lav davka and ...


6

The above answer is excellent. One thing many shuls provide are shiurim (classes) on various subjects, and this another excellent way to meet a friendly group of people. If your neighborhood has a JCC, this can be another means to meet people. Besides classes, many have sports, art, or other activities. Volunteering on a Jewish project is another way. My ...


5

My personal experience, as Shaliach tzibur, to silence the Schul talkers has been to stop as soon as I sensed any utterances coming from the congregation. Following a few seconds of showing my "respect" for their private conversations, utter silence would reign. One or two more such treatments allowed me to complete the prayer properly. No rabbi and no ...


5

Rabbi Yaakov Robinson from Chicago gave a shiur on the topic of breakaway minyanim. You can listen to the shiur here. He specifically mentions that he is not discussing the topic of home minyanim (which he says has its own issues), but rather, he is discussing creating a new shul. Here is my summary of the shiur: The RIVaSh, one of the rishonim, says that ...


5

In the sefer Ishei Yisrael pg 423, the author cites the Ketzos Hashulchan siman 25:14 that if one prayed alone then one should read the parsha from a chumash. He then cites in the next halacha (from Mishna Brurah 143:9, and Orach Neman seif 7) that in a place (yishuv) where there is no kosher sefer Torah then one person from the minyan should read from a ...


5

While, as Seth J answered, there's likely nothing wrong with it, anyone signing up to study toward a communal siyum in someone's memory should bear in mind that doing so is partially for the deceased's relatives' peace of mind and comfort. If the relatives are of the sort that would be disturbed by a woman's contributing toward the siyum, it might be better ...


5

Machzor Vitri - page 206 brings a story on Rosh Chodesh which was Chanuka where they took out 2 Sefer Torahs and the person who read the Torah, in error read 4 Aliyos in Rosh Chodesh and the Halacha was determined that had they not taken out a second Sefer Torah they could of just skipped the Chanuka reading, however since the Torah was taken out, if we did ...


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