45

The Rema writes in the first Halacha of Shulchan Aruch (Partial Quote) וְלֹא יִתְבַּיֵּשׁ מִפְּנֵי בְּנֵי אָדָם הַמַּלְעִיגִים עָלָיו בַּעֲבוֹדַת ה' יִתְבָּרַךְ גַּם בְּהֶצְנֵעַ לֶכֶת. And one should not be ashamed because of people who mock him in his service of God, and should also go modestly. Whatever decision you come to, I feel like this is ...


41

There is not such a thing as "too orthodox", no. There can be such a thing as "too pushy" when people are too direct in trying to change others, but that's not the situation you've described. Never feel guilty about following halacha for yourself. There can also be such a thing as "unfamiliar and thus different". The only synagogue in town is the only ...


15

You can come early and get a head start, this way you are holding with the Tzibbur when Shemona Esrei starts. Another option would be to slowly educate them to the beauty of Tefila, and thereby get the speed decreased.


15

You might be a source of inspiration for others that want to be more observant. Keep going.


14

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


13

I have seen some shuls that actually have people sign a formalized contract not to talk during davening and then post that near the entrance to the shul. I think that whatever the approach, the most successful way would be to get wide-spread buy in from everyone first. Any approach that singles people out, even with halachic basis, will have a hard time ...


13

I once visited the Kemp Mill Synagogue and IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY this was the deal they had made: the congregartion agreed not to talk at all during services, and in return the Rabbi agreed to give his sermon after all the prayers had ended (ie after mussaf), thus allowing for those who did not want to stay for the sermon to leave. The vast majority of ...


13

If you find that your questions are not being received as they were intended and they were asked with the proper deference (כבוד רבך ככבוד שמים), perhaps you need to ask your question of authorities who are willing to address it, or are comfortable saying they don't know the answer - but may research it. Or, you can ask your question here where you have a ...


13

Among those Rabbis that I know, if/when they are approached by someone who wasn't raised as a Jew but has a Jewish maternal grandparent, they welcome them with open arms as Jews, albeit Jews who have been estranged from their own religion. I have known this to have occurred on multiple occasions (although I was never personally involved in any). It may be ...


12

Since it includes Reform and Conservative organizations in its roster. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agudath_Israel_of_America#Positions In 1956 for example, the moetzes issued a written ruling forbidding Orthodox rabbis to join with any Reform or Conservative rabbis in rabbinical communal professional organizations that then united the various ...


11

I saw it once at my shul on a Sunday morning. After minyan there is usually some people that learn in the beit midrash afterwards. One time, someone came in and had missed minyan. He put on his tefillin and started davening to himself. When he got to Yishtabach, he klopped on the shulchan and finished it out loud and said barchu. Then he continued to himself....


10

The Shaalos U'tshuvos Afraksa D'Anya - Siman 30 discusses this question and concludes that each mourner may have his own Minyan.


10

Sounds like you have a very complicated situation. This may be a job for a therapist. Again, concepts of "sanctuary for repentance" don't really fit with the vocabulary of Judaism. But for theory's sake: at your average Orthodox Union synagogue, if someone shows up and says "I wasn't raised observant, I was previously married to someone not Jewish and now ...


10

No, the rabbi wouldn't find it strange. & Yes, he would accepted you at the spot as 100% jewish. And I can tell you from my own personal experience they would be even very happy!


10

Orach Chaim 104:7 & Aruch Hahulchan 104:13 say that one who is in middle of Shemona Esrei when the Chazan reaches Kedusha should remain quiet and listen to the Chazan recite the Kedusha and it is as if he responded.


9

When this question was posed to the Lubavitcher Rebbe, he answered as follows (Igerot Kodesh vol 18, letter 6583). I apologize for my translation: נוהגים בכגון דא, להתחיל התפלה עם הצבור, ואחרי כן להתפלל כפי יכולתו, ז.א. בכוונה כפי יכולתו, ובאם מתארך תפלתו יותר מן הצבור, הרי העיקר בתפלה היא השימת לב והכוונה, ובהתחלתו ביחד עם הצבור, הרי גם בזה מעין תפלה ...


9

About the second part of the question: Yalkut Shimoni (to Esther 4:16) says that he limited the fast to those "found in Shushan" because they were the ones who had eaten at Achashverosh's feast. The Jews in the rest of the empire weren't guilty of that. [That they too were in danger is attributed by R. Shimon bar Yochai (Megillah 12a) to their having bowed ...


9

Your second question is easier to answer: The MB 122:4 quotes the Maamar Mordechai that one who is finished with his tefila, but cannot step back because someone behind him is still in the middle of tefilla, "he may say then even baruch hu uvaruch shemo". It sounds to me like you may go on with other prayers as well, but I cannot say that with 100% ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


8

On the verse in Devarim 32:4 הַצּוּר תָּמִים פָּעֳלוֹ, כִּי כָל-דְּרָכָיו מִשְׁפָּט: אֵל אֱמוּנָה וְאֵין עָוֶל, צַדִּיק וְיָשָׁר הוּא, I have heard (do not remember the source) that Hashem is different than a regular ruler. For example - a regular ruler when he punishes a person and puts him in jail for a crime, his wife and children suffer even though they ...


8

Some options: JCCs (Jewish Community Centers) -- these have a wide variety of things going on, everything from lectures to social events to fitness classes; see if there's one where you live. Find the local Jewish newspaper or community web site, which is likely to advertise non-religious events along with the religious ones. My local newspaper announces/...


8

The rule of thumb Rabbi Moshe Feinstein applies is to not be disruptive. In communities where it is clearly the standard practice that all men wear tallitot, I would think that doing otherwise would be disruptive and/or disrespectful. (And what's the downside, really?) As for what text you yourself use, as long as you're not too loud, generally people aren'...


8

The word "Orthodox" is ambiguous. Technically, it is a sociological grouping. Because in practice, that group is of people trying to observe classical notions of halakhah, we think of "Orthodox" as the set of Torah observant people, or sometimes, the community / communities of Torah observant people. (There is a gap there I want to point out: There is more ...


8

The original method (dating back to the Tosefta Berakhot 1:11) which was uniformly practiced in all locations (Ashkenaz, Poland, Spain, North Africa, Yemen, Italy, etc.) is simply the leader recites the entire paragraph out loud and the congregation says the verses from Tanakh along with him (eg. "Kadosh...Kevodo"). This is the version endorsed by ...


7

I would just insist that they slow down or you go elsewhere. If the Tzibbur is not fulfilling their requirement anyway, there's no need for you to sacrifice the quality of your Tefillah in or order to allow them the illusion of fulfilling theirs.


7

The simple answer is two-fold: The Jews already knew that the decree had occurred, and they were quite upset about ("v'hair shushan navocha"). You can imagine they were paying attention to the local news. Mordechai was the head of the Sanhedrin, in addition to being a figure in the king's court, both very visible positions. Given (1), people were probably ...


7

Regarding part A of the question, the Beis Yosef in Orech Chaim 102 s.v. כתב cites the Mahari Abuhav as saying that one needs to wait even if the person behind them started after them. As far as the people in front of you (the person waiting), R' Shlomo Zalman Aurbach (Halichos Shlomo Hilchos Tefillah ch. 8 os 47) writes that the shechina is still "present" ...


7

Rambam is explicit and passionate on this topic (Hilchot Talmud Torah 3:10) . . . NO!!!!: "Anyone who decides to be engaged in Torah [study] and not to work, and will be supported by Tzedaqa - this person desecrates God's name (Chillel et Hashem), degrades the Torah, extinguishes the light of our faith, brings evil upon himself and forfeits life in Olam ...


7

The Magen Avraham in Shuchan Aruch siman 53:4 says that an individual who reaches Yishtabach should say it right away.


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