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25

The Shulchan Aruch was written by Rabbi Yosef Karo in the mid-sixteenth century. That is the reference to #1 ("stam" means plain, without any additional qualifications. Since then, others have appropriated the name or made names that have allusions to it, when writing books which have a similar purpose - to structure and organize Jewish Law into a relatively ...


12

Even Ha'Ezer contains halachot about "דיני אישות", so it would seem that the name is a play on words from "אעשה לו עזר כנגדו" which describes Hashem's creation of Chava (and women in general). The phrase itself is mentioned twice in Shmuel 1 (4, 1 and 7, 12). It is indeed a "stone of help" - that's how Shmuel called it to signify "עד הנה עזרנו ה'", "until ...


8

In the introduction to טור חושן משפט (Tur Choshen Mishpat), it says: והטור השלישי אבן העזר שם עשיתי לאדם עזר כנגדו גם כשלחה גרש איך יגרשנה מנגדו וקראתיו אבן העזר יען כי הוא להועיל גם לעזר:‏ In my translation: And the third column 'Even ha-'Ezer, there I made for man a help opposite him (based on Bereshit 2:18), and as he might send her, how he may ...


8

The Beit Yosef there is referring to חלק י״ח, section 18, of Rabbeinu Yerocham's discussion of the laws of Shabbat in his Sefer Toledot Adam veChavah, Adam, Netiv 12. Thus, בחי״ח stands for בחלק י״ח.


6

R. Jacob Reischer addresses this in a responsum: Shu"t Shevut Yaakov 1:159 גם על הטור אין תימא כל כך דאף דלאו בפירוש אתמר מכללא אתמר כיון דאיסור לקצוץ אילנות הוא לאו דוקא אלא ה"ה כל המאבד דרך השחתה עובר בלא תשחית כלשון הרמב"ם ואיסורא דבל תשחית מוזכר כמה פעמים בטור וכמבואר בי"ד הל' אבילות סי' שמ"ט וסי' ש"ן ע"ש והיתרא דמותר לקוץ במקום דמזיק לאחריני מבואר ...


5

The way I understood the Tur is that its not about the weather. The weather in Tishrai and Nissan are around the same. The issue is the BUILDING of the Sukka. People generally do not buy patio furniture to sit outside in the fall. You generally build your outdoor huts in the spring because the spring is the start of good weather. The fall is the end of it ...


5

According to what I've been taught, philosophy was the essence of Judaism to the Rambam, so it makes sense that he would treat philosophical issues (practical ones) in the Yad. Indeed quite a bit of Yesode haTorah is metaphysics! Perhaps other Rishonim saw these areas as less intrinsic to halachah.


4

Different strokes for different folks. I personally prefer SD. I've used both but the HaMaor only when I don't have the SD. Some differences: SD sticks to basic textual corrections and critical (and sometime classical) glosses on Tur & commentaries; very "non-crowded" pages; doesn't carry itself like an encyclopedia. On the other hand, I find HaMaor to ...


3

Observing the 7 Mitzvos does not change their status as Gentiles. The prohibitions of marrying gentiles (just like all other illicit relations) do not differentiate between righteous and wicked ones. The relations are forbidden in any way. PS I feel very uncomfortable discussing the details of the Jewish Halachah with a Noachide as it is not endorsed by ...


3

I didn't find pictures unfortunately, but sharp heads are just that - like in sharks, while kosher fish have a more rounded head, as their mouths are in the front. The spine means actual bones, as opposed to no bones, or cartilage. Kosher fish will always be from the bony fish family. Some more here and here. But the main point I think, as mentioned in the ...


3

He (they) may not have felt the need, as he was writing for a fully observant audience that may need to reference laws for practical purposes and learning. RaMBa"M may have intended to reach a broader audience. Compare the different Hakdamoth for clues.


3

The Rashba (Berachot 11a) proves that different nuschaot are ok because the Talmud does not give numbers of words for each bracha thereby implying that any text that says the right general idea works. See this article for more about different nuschaot.


2

Here is an image (from a late 14th century - early 15th century manuscript of the Tur) of the beginning of Siman 89 (although this manuscript seems to be from before the simanim were labeled, but you can compare it to siman 89 here), where the heading for הלכות תפילה should appear. Here is the beginning of Siman 61, where the heading for הלכות קריאת שמע ...


2

The old print of the sefer is available here on HebrewBooks. A newer print of it was published in the 1980's by Machon HaKtav, I'm not sure if you can buy printed copies anymore (my yeshiva has it in their library), but this new print (as well as the old one) is available on Otzar HaChochma.


2

While most of the editions of Shulchan Aruch that I checked do not have Hilchos Tevillah as a new section, I did find two editions that do have it (images below). Interestingly, both of these editions do not have a title in the middle of the page stating that Hilchos Tevillah has now begun; it's only at the top of the page where the heading changes from ...


1

According to my Oz V’hadar extended Mesivta Haggadah, page 725, Tosfos (Berachos 14a DH “yamim”), among other Rishonim, write that the meal is considered an interruption of the Mitzvah. In this vein, the Ra’avya (§525) writes that one shouldn’t make two Berachos on two halves of a Mitzvah. This seems to be the rationale for the opinion cited by the Tur. ...


1

The standard Baal HaTurim in the Mikraot Gedolot Chumash is just the Gematriot the he wrote of, but he actually did write much more. I've heard that the publishers had room for an additional small commentary so they just put the extra parts of the Tur's commentary in and not the whole thing. See here. I've seen it on many a Beit Midrash bookshelf. The ...


1

You're right. "tending toward tseirei" is exactly equivalent to the shva that you already heard about. When a shva is in the beginning of a word, it sounds very similar to a tseirei, just quicker. That's probably what the Bach meant by "tending toward tseirei". A semi-proof for this we see in Mishna Berura (same place) where he says: ... וגם בנקודת אדנ"י,...


1

As far as I know the Beth Yosef was published while Rabbi Moshe Isserles was at work on the Darkhei Moshe (Haaroch), when he recognized that Rabbi Yosef Karo's commentary to the Tur largely met his objectives, Rabbi Moshe Isserles published the Darkhei Moshe in a modified form- Darkhei Moshe Hakatsar, Only things that the Beth Yosef didn't already commented ...


1

You can still buy the machon haktav one, I saw them selling it at one of there sales contact them at Jerusalem it is absolutely huge though, like 23 volumes, they sell them individually


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