9

Like many Anglicized versions of biblical names, the name Balaam comes through the Greek language of the Septuagint, which renders בלעם as βαλααμ. The reason the Septuagint spells it so differently from the Hebrew MT may either be due to limitations of the Greek language to accurately represent Hebrew, changes in the way Greek and/or Hebrew vowels were ...


8

The challenge is that there are different ways to pronounce Hebrew. Ashkenazim, Sefaradim, Teimanim, etc. all pronounce words differently. There is a very interesting project called OpenSiddur which developed an open source tool to build your own siddur. As part of this they have incorporated eight(!) different transliteration schemes Rules of ...


7

The name Ἰησοῦς is used consistently for both Joshua and Jesus in the LXX (not Ιησούς, which is the modernized spelling, though accents weren't marked in the oldest texts). To my knowledge, this is the only accepted Greek spelling for Joshua (attested also in Philo, Life of Moses 1.216 and Josephus, Antiquities 5.1.1). יְהוֹשֻׁעַ and יֵשׁוּעַ were variants ...


7

If I'm not mistaken, Dayan Gukovitzky's Targum HaLaaz has a transliteration guide. It seems that Rashi did have a specific set of rules for doing this.


7

The RCA Madrich (rabbi's handbook) by Rabbi Reuven P. Bulka has it vowelized.


6

https://archive.org/details/ReadingKesubah has an mp3 audio recording of it.


5

הער״ט איר ניט = Did you not hear. I have heard some Chasidim who call their wife Her-nor הער-נאר = Listen


5

At lease according to some rishonim, any language other than Ancient Hebrew is not truly a language but rather an agreed upon method of communication (see the Ran in his commentary in the beginning of Masecta Nedarim, as well as the Raavad on the Rambam's hilchot kriyat shema 2, 10). According to the aforementioned opinion, using English letters (or any ...


4

Here is for the 5 books of Moses https://headcoverings-by-devorah.com/HebEngTaNaKhIndex.html


4

The yiddish word bavoren/bavorenin as in: Rashi already bavorened that kasha (question). it would translate to: Rashi preempted that question (by stating something that resolves the potential question, without actually specifying that he intends to answer a question). (In my Yiddish dictionary, it's translated as "a security" - in this context, it means ...


4

There is more than one opinion on this matter. For example: Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik famously wrote GOD on a blackboard and erased it in front of a class to make it clear that it was not a "shem" when it is not Hebrew. I have read this numerous places but you can find it referenced here. That being said, it could be seen as more respectful to write G-...


4

Hebrewbooks has the modern print of the Tehillas Hashem (Chabad) siddur. This siddur has transliterated certain sections of the prayer services, starting from this page. The transliteration of Kaddish and Kedushah on the relevant pages; for example, the Mourner's Kaddish here.


3

Nit'ey Gavriel nesuin part 1 page 344. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=46545&pgnum=344 Has it with nekudot with commentaries (one of the commentaries explains why he decided to put these nekudot)


3

Here is the transliteration for the Hadran: Hadran alach hashishah sidrei mishnah vehadarach alan, datan alach hashishah sidrei mishnah vedatach alan. La nitnashei minach hashishah sidrei mishnah vela titnashei minan, la be'alma hadein vela be'alma de'atei. Yehi ratzon milefanecha eloheinu velohei avoteinu shetehe toratecha umanutenu ba'olam hazeh ...


3

I am currently working on a transliterated Chabad siddur. So far I have the Morning Blessings up until the Akedah. You can see my progress here. The transliteration is in Sefardi / Modern Israeli Hebrew pronunciation. Edit: The section for the Tefillat HaShachar is complete, from Modeh Ani to the beginning of the Korbanot! You can see it here. I will be ...


3

Here's nusach Sefard (or maybe Sephardi?): http://atase-bilbao.blogspot.com/2009/05/amida.html And here's a harder-to-read version with both nusach sephard and Sephardi nusach: http://shalomhaverim.org/conversion10.html For Kabalat Shabbat prayers, check out a this Spanish siddur with translation and transliteration: http://www.scribd.com/doc/82745593/...


3

The review of the Book Frumspeak has a good example of many untranslated words so far: This is a gevaldike sefer, and I got asach hanaa from it. The etzem dictionary is gantz useful for talmidim of the shprach, and it's also geshmak to stam read through, which is a big toeles. The hakdoma, on the metzius of yeshivish, is tief, and the other ...


2

יהי רצון מלפניך,‏ שתמלא רצונך ולא רצוני, ושאהיה מרכבה לרצונך.‏ בפרטות, אבקש ממך אמונה ובטחון בך.‏ ואין ספק שבידך לעזרני.‏


2

Le'maiseh, it's not mistaber. For all practical intents and purposes, it doesn't make sense It's a shver sugya to discuss with my shver. It's a difficult topic to discuss with my father in law. B'kitzur, the whole matzav is nisht poshut. In short, the whole situation is not simple. Altz list question, I think this question is on topic. Ubber, ...


1

Some common ones are: כ as kh while ח is ch. ק is q while כ with a dagesh is k Another is using ḥ for ח and kh for כ. Then there's ṭ for ט and a t for ת Seghol is e, whereas shewa na is just an apostrophe. There are no real published standards. Everyone takes some of these, but not all. It's all a bit of a mess. Another great question is how do you ...


1

Here is the transliteration of the ketubah. I have chosen to use the Modern Israeli pronunciation, as it is very common and somewhat "universal" among Jews of all backgrounds. To those who are more familiar with the ketubah text than me, please check and see if I missed anything or made a mistake. For reference, I used the text that hazoriz provided in his ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible