13

Premarital sexual intercourse is not a kinyan unless it is done with the intention of being koneh. Not only that, but the man must say as much. Rambam Hil Ishus 3:5 (my own translation): ואם קידש בביאה אומר לה הרי את מקודשת לי או הרי את מאורסת לי או הרי את לי לאשה בבעילה זו וכל כיוצא בזה. ומתייחד עמה בפני שני עדים ובועלה If he betroths (mekadesh) with ...


10

Rabbi Reisman in Hilchos Ribis deals with this. If you are going to spend the money, then that is defined as a loan and any fee for that 'rental' is 'ribis'. Renting property means that you return the same property that you rented, such as renting a tractor to plow your field. That is why there is a discussion as to borrowing flour to make a cake and when, ...


10

I would think that the normal assumption for an employee discount would that it would be for the personal use of the employee and not for his friends and not for him to do business with. I am supported in this by this article about the Original Employee Discount. He quotes: “When you come [to work] in your neighbor’s vineyard, then you may eat the ...


9

I got interested in the question because we did once win a sefer Torah at such a raffle during a tsedaka dinner for a school. It was organized by an organization run by a well-respected and very knowledgeable rav and no one raised halachik issues. Your question got me thinking. I found an interesting source on the topic. dinonline writes Panim Me’iros (3:...


9

You could not circumvent the obligation, as an Eved Ivri remains obligated in positive time-bound commandments. (An Eved Kena'ani is not, but to make your plan work you'd have to first become a Kena'ani.)


7

Tosafot in Avoda Zara, 2a s.v. אסור answer this question. (By the way, not every one agrees to the "three days" thing Avodah Zara 7b.) A: because of איבה, i.e. if Jews never did business with Christians before their holidays this would cause undue hatred of Jews. However, the Tosafot reject this, because there is no hatred, because the Jew could just say ...


7

The poskim discuss the case of a person who separated challah with a b'rachah and then did hataras n'darim to nullify the separation (and therefore will have to separate again). Is the person's b'rachah considered l'vatalah? The Chasam Sofer says it was not l'vatalah, possibly based on the S'dei Chemed, Vol. 6, p. 320. But the case of the tallis may be ...


7

It depends on what you mean by "use," because the mode of use (both actual and contractual - see Shach YD 176:1) affects whether the money is considered "loaned" or "rented." In a loan, the money is generally meant to be used financially and may be replaced with equivalent currency. In such a case, the laws prohibiting lending on interest apply. However, if ...


7

בס"ד Ownership In regards to whether you have ownwership with a rental. The entirety of the hotel belongs to the owner of the hotel, including the rooms that we, the guests are renting from the owner, so when I carry around the hotel I am carrying within the property of that owner. The room I rent in the hotel is not my property unless it is a long ...


6

The Maharsham in 3:151 was asked about such a case where someone sold their sins to someone else. He first addresses whether or not a valid act of kinyan could be done - if it was done through קנין סיטומתא (ex. a handshake), then the kinyan may be effective even though there is no "object" to be acquired, just as סיטומתא works on something that has not yet ...


6

This is most certainly "a thing": Shopping Bag One should preferably not put meat and dairy foods in one shopping bag. Meat and dairy foods may drip on one another. The wrappers of packaged meats may be fatty and touch other foods. Cottage cheese and yogurt containers may open and spill. (The Laws of Kashurs, Rabbi Binyomin Forst, page 361) I have ...


6

The auction in this mishnah is dealing with buying from hekdesh. Hekdesh, or the property of the Temple) always has the upper hand in negotiations because stealing from the Temple is the sin of Meila. So these people must repay the difference in case they cause the Temple a loss and thus the mishnah is merely stringent. Ericin deals with giving value to ...


6

If the non-Jew has children who knew about the sale, since according to Torah law a non-Jew inherits his father automatically - they just buy it back from the son. But if he had no children OR they didn't didn't know of the sale in which case the Chometz is Hefker then the Mahrsham permits the Chometz to be eaten after Pesach. All this is a synopsis of ...


6

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 448:5 rules that chometz which is found in your home after Pesach, even if you nullified it, is forbidden. The Tur there (cited by Magen Avraham and Taz) explains that we are worried that a person will say he nullified it even if he didn't. This isn't a problem for those crumbs that you don't want anyways. But for that box of cheerios ...


6

As with many questions of this type, the answer is "it is a machlokes" You would have to consult your specific Rav. The OU actually goes into some details on this. What’s the Truth about . . . the Sale of Chametz on Pesach? The utensils themselves present more of a challenge. The question of what to do with chametzdik, non-kasherable dishes is ...


5

Interesting question! While we can only guess as to what exactly happened, we do find a concept in a number of places (see for example Choshen Mishpat siman 62) of a woman who is נושאת ונותנת בתוך הבית, which means that she runs the household, and thus may use her husband's money to purchase things, to hire workers, etc. Perhaps she had this status, and thus ...


5

(I found all these sources in Nit'ei Gavriel on Aveilus ch. 32 footnote 1.) A "Chanukas HaBayis" is an old custom first mentioned (though not by name) in the midrash (Tanchuma Bereishis 2 et. al.). The Radak (Shorashim, חנך) writes that "it is a minhag to have a meal and happiness at the first eating that they eat in the new house." The Maharshal (Yam ...


5

There are Jewish communities which have the custom that if a tragedy happened in a home, the current owners will move out. This is based on the Rabbinic expression "one who changes his location changes his luck". However, there is no reason for somebody else not to move into such a home. In Jerusalem - and other predominantly Jewish areas - such homes are ...


5

For the general rule, Shulchan Aruch Yore Dei’ah Simon 117 reads like this (parentheses are RaMah): “Anything that is forbidden by Torah law, even if it is something that one may derive pleasure thereof, if it is something specifically for food – it is forbidden to do business with it (or to borrow against it. Even to buy it to feed it to his non-Jewish ...


5

Rockland Kosher calls it Chulent Meat. My butcher told me it is any sort of boneless beef that has been cut off to trim a roast.


5

I've never heard of any issue with it, and Rabbi Kasriel Kaplan has bought used sidurim. So it seems to be fine to do so.


5

I once asked this to Rabbi Dovid Feinstein. He said it is assur to pay cash in this type of situation. Paying taxes is an enforced law which falls in the category of Dina Di'malchusa which one must keep.


5

One may make a kinyan on hefker items on shabbos (R' Akiva Eiger 339:6 s.v. משום מקח וממכר, Aishel Avraham 371:7), provided that he does so in a way that is not evident to people that he's trying to make a kinyan (Shmiras Shabbos Kihilchoso 29:32).


5

Look at the Mishnayot a few after that one: נכסים שיש להם אחריות, נקנין בכסף ובשטר ובחזקה.‏ [Land] is acquired through money, documents and [usage]. Examples (given by Bartenura) of the "usage" technique for land include plowing the land, locking the opening, and building a fence. Additionally, you can find that: עבד כנעני נקנה בכסף ובשטר ...


5

The parallel Chazzal to this is found in Rus Rabba 7 11. There the Eitz Yosef explains that the function of this kinyan was actually a ruse to ensure witnesses. He says the barrel of treats was smashed which brought all the children to come gather them. They in turn would remember what had transpired being that children have good memories, as it says ...


5

This is a complex question and you need to ask a rav if this had practical implications. If this is a theoretical question, one might learn from the laws of lost objects (asheivat aveida), second chapter of Bava Metsia (21a and ff), based on Devarim 22:1-3 If you see your brother's animal, you shall not hide from it; you must return it to the owner. If ...


5

Hazaka only works with the original owner's consent. Rambam, Laws of Sales Chapter 1: א,ז [ח] כיצד בחזקה: מכר לו בית או שדה, או נתן אותן מתנה--כיון שנעל או גדר או פרץ כל שהוא, והוא שיועיל במעשיו--הרי זה קנה. א,ח במה דברים אמורים, בשהחזיק בפני המוכר. אבל שלא בפני המוכר או הנותן, צריך שיאמר לו לך חזק וקנה; ואחר כך אם החזיק--קנה, אף על פי שאינו ...


4

According to the Malbim's commentary, Boaz chose to do Yibum in order to spiritually reincarnate Rus's deceased husband, Machalon, which is the Zohar's approach to what happens in Yibum - the soul of the deceased is reincarnated into the son born of the Yibum union. (See Malbim to 4:14, for example.) Along the same lines, he may have chosen to acquire the ...


4

According to the Mishneh Torah, Avodah Zara ve-Chukot ha-Goyim 9:4, Christians are Ovdei Avodah Zarah( idolaters), Sunday is their Yom Eidam( holyday, festival), and one is forbidden to do business with them, on Thursday till Sunday of every week in the Land of Israel, but only on Sunday itself everywhere else. Same goes for their other holidays.


4

I need to find a specific proof for this presumption, but when I learned retroactive areas, I pictured 2 timelines, 1 that happened but discontinued, and 1 that supplanted the first timeline and continued (Think Back to the Future). In the case of the esrog, the retroactive reality of not owning the esrog supplants the reality of the one where he owns the ...


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