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Found it in R. Yaakov Culi's Me'am Lo'ez Pirkei DeRabbi Eliezer 24 says If a man fell and died they paid no heed to him, but if a brick fell they sat down and wept, and said: Woe is us ! when will another one come in its stead? And Abraham, son of Terah, passed by, and saw them building the city and the tower, and he cursed them in the name of his God, as ...


6

See here for a full explanation of Rav Yonasan Eibeshitz's idea of the generation attempting to build a tower so high it would reach beyond the gravitational pull of the Earth. Then, they planned to have a boat-like vessel atop the tower to be carried up from the Earth's winds to the moon, where they would no longer need to fear torrential rain. (Rav


4

Babel, a New Society? The Tower of Babel (Genesis 11:1–8) was an attempt to reach heaven by the Babylonians. The Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 109a explains as follows: “Let us go up to the heavens and dwell there,” and Let us ascend and wage war against G-d.” They also said, “Let us ascend to heaven and worship our idols.” Talmud (Sandhedrin 109a) says ...


1

Ralbag offers an interesting perspective on this topic: The people wanted to build the tower for two reasons. To make a name for themselves by building a great tower, and to leave a memory of themselves. To help them not stray too far away. With a big tower they could always see it and calibrate their location, and be able to remain all together in the ...


1

I've heard people reference Sanhedrin 106b when mentioning it, although there doesn't seem to be any link between the two. א"ר ארבע מאה בעיי' בעו דואג ואחיתופל במגדל הפורח באויר Rav said, 'Doeg and Achitophel asked four hundred questions about a tower that floats in the air' Rashi gives a number of explanations, among them: במגדל הפורח באויר - לעשות ...


1

Since rocket ships are a modern invention, the concept of "building up to heaven" or "being able to go to heaven" is a spiritual or theoretical idea. It is like "aron haporeich ba-avir" (a flying box) in the talmud. As a result, the meforshim do not deal with this on the level of a rocket ship. a tower whose top shall reach unto heaven is an expression ...


1

Hebrew is a member of the Semitic language family. According to scholars, all Semitic languages evolved from "Proto-Semitic", an unknown language that has traits common to all of the various languages of the family tree. One could argue that the language spoken by G-d, Adam, and the angels was this language, and even that Hebrew in its unadulterated form is ...


1

The Tower of Babel is not discussed in any other Biblical texts, and any discussion and commentary in Jewish sources would have been written centuries after the original story. However, there are Sumerian (Mesopotamian) sources from that approximate era that describe a great temple in Babylon, and it has been suggested that the story is referring to an ...


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