9

Tosfot (Gittin 59b) answers (based on a similar case in Tosefta Megilla 3:6) that to distinguish the two sections, the kohen would go sit down back in his seat and then stand up again and go up to the Torah.


8

It does exist and appears precisely once in Tanach, in Mishlei 30:6: אַל־תּ֥וֹסְףְּ עַל־דְּבָרָ֑יו פֶּן־יוֹכִ֖יחַ בְּךָ֣ וְנִכְזָֽבְתָּ׃


7

Per letter from Rabbi Hershel Schachter dated 26 Iyar 5780, although the Minhag is only to say it B'Tzibur, it is similar to a Shabbos songs such as Ko Ribon that one may say without a Minyan.


5

Try https://www.tikkun.io. Full disclosure: I'm the creator of this site. As a software developer and avid Torah reader, I found nothing online that I enjoyed using and that was free. This one will be free forever.


4

While it used to be commonly assumed that they would just repeat the reading as often as necessary, evidence from the Cairo Geizah revealed they would add verses after the "main" sections to have enough room for all 7 readers. While there certainly could have been many variant practices, the evidence we have points to the following end points for ...


4

So firstly to ascertain a source for a Kohein going up in place of a Levi: Rambam in Mishneh Torah in Hilchos Tefillah and Bircas Kohanim 12:19 writes: אֵין שָׁם כֹּהֵן עוֹלֶה יִשְׂרָאֵל. וְלֹא יַעֲלֶה אַחֲרָיו לֵוִי כְּלָל. אֵין שָׁם לֵוִי כֹּהֵן שֶׁקָּרָא רִאשׁוֹן חוֹזֵר וְקוֹרֵא הוּא עַצְמוֹ פַּעַם שְׁנִיָּה בִּמְקוֹם לֵוִי. אֲבָל לֹא יִקְרָא אַחֲרָיו ...


3

In this past week's GSEM, R' Mantel at KAJ said that Akdamut may be said and that further, one should read the 'Aseret haDibrot in ta'am 'elyon.


3

In his book on Tiberian Hebrew (pp. 135ff), Geoffrey Khan suggests that in fact, the dot in the aleph is to be pronounced as a doubling of the consonant, not simply as a sign that the aleph should be read as a consonant. In other words, he suggests that the dot in the aleph is in fact a dagesh hazak, not a mappik. His arguments are based on the following ...


2

I'm not sure if this is helpful since I can't think of sources about the the yad as such. But it does seem to be a long standing principal that removing one's eyes from the words even for a second during a public kriah is an issur because then you are transmitting torah shebitkhav in public from memory and it invalidates the reading. So blocking would be a ...


2

Each approach is endorsed by a posek. R' Moshe Shternbuch permits giving aliyot to those who will remain more than 6 feet away from the torah and compares it to the (Ashkenazik) permissability to give an aliyah to someone who is blind. Rav Asher Weiss disagrees and feels it is better to give all aliyot to the one reading from the torah. See the full, well ...


2

Basically, it is whatever the reading would have been had it been a regular shabbos, so the reading from the next parsha. The reason is that we don't read the Torah by Mincha on holidays (except Yom Kippur) so it is actually a regular Shabbos reading, and not a holiday reading.


2

In order to understand the various answers you may see to this question these days, it's imperative you understand their background. The basic law is to read the Torah sequentially, but occasionally the sequence is interrupted (such as on Yom Tov). All other breaking points are entirely customary. Historically some communities read sequentially to finish the ...


2

I wrote a dvar Torah on this subject for this past Shavuot with some original chidushim, posted here: It All Started With a Little Dot By Alan A. Mazurek, MD First a little grammar lesson (so please bear with me, and don’t fall asleep; it is after all Shavuot night!) It was several years ago and I went to Larry Schiffman’s dikduk (grammar) class after ...


2

The maftir for second day of chanukah which falls on shabbat is Bamidbar 7:18-23. See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 684:1-2 with Mishnah Berurah 684:6.


2

See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 690:14 who brings two opinions. One that simply says that we don’t make a fuss about mistakes, and a yesh omrim which limits this to mistakes which don’t change the meaning. So it would seem that according to both opinions, a mistake in the ta’amim would not be corrected.


2

There are lots of Torah reading tutors, for almost every possible musical tradition. There are CDs, youtubes, and even programs you can buy. I have no idea what tradition you're looking for, but here's some things to keep in mind generally: If you aren't the most musical, then properly learning to read with grammatical rules should be your focus. You can ...


1

Dunno if this is the way, but there is a standard tune for the Ashkenazi trop, running through all the symbols. Munach zarka-aah, munach segol, munach, munach, revii... I've always seen the Bar Mitzvah boys begin by just learning that tune very well. Once you can sing it in your sleep, you can start attaching little pieces of it to what you read.


1

The 1969 edition in my house also has that mistake.


1

This question intrigued me, as in the I Shul I Daven in, they say it after Maftir. Yes, per the Mishna Berura 288:28 one may make a Mi Sheberach for a sick person on Shabbos, so long as you say שבת היא מלזעוק ורפואה קרובה לבוא. Although I have not been able to find a source for doing this after Shishi, I have found a interesting tidbit in Sefer Shaarei Yemei ...


1

Regarding vav, see msh210's answer here. Regarding lamed, Wikipedia has a nice article discussing prefixes in Hebrew. A short summary follows, but see there for all the details: Lamed meaning 'to' normally takes a sheva, although there are exceptions for cases when the next letter of the word has a specific vowel (e.g. before a sheva the lamed instead takes ...


1

See Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 139:3: אפילו ראש הכנסת או חזן לא יקרא עד שיאמרו לו קרא ונהגו ששליח צבור כשרוצה מברך וקורא בלי נטילת רשות משום דהוי כאלו משעה שמינוהו לש"ץ הרשוהו על כך: הגה ובמדינות אלו אין נוהגין כן ואין החזן עולה רק כשהסגן אומר לו לעלות אבל אין קורין לו בשמו כמו שאר העולים שקוראים אותם בשמם פלוני בר פלוני. Even the president of the ...


1

Bevis Marks Synagogue in London used what they called Western Sephardic Ayin. That's a 'Ng' not as guttural as the middle eastern Sephardic. I think maybe Amsterdam Sephardic community is the same.


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