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7 votes

Having a mystical or "religious experience"

Here are a few thoughts: Learning Torah deeply, teaches one to switch from seeing nature as natural, to seeing it as miraculous, e.g. the story of R' Chanina Ben Dosa and the vinegar. Once one sees ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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7 votes
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Saying God is Great in Arabic - is a Jew allowed?

The Pri Chadash (Yoreh Deah 19:6) discusses whether a Jew can say this after reciting the brachah on shechitah. He rules that it is prohibited to say this after the brachah because it is a hefsek ...
wfb's user avatar
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4 votes

Having a mystical or "religious experience"

According to Pinchas Ben Yair, in the Talmud (Avodah Zarah 20B and other places), if one wants spiritual revelations they must work on themselves until, after a many step process, they are refined ...
Menachem's user avatar
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4 votes
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What does "אל" mean?

Rav Schwab on Prayer (Artscroll) p.415 when he writes on the opening blessing of the Amida notes on the word הא-ל the following: הא-ל - The Almighty. Hakadosh Baruch hu is not bound by middos, ...
Dov's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why do Rabbis say that HaShem was mistaken and HaShem states that He was defeated and that He must obey the Rabbis?

Let's break it down. Firstly, it seems the question is unaware of something fairly standard in traditional Judaism, which is Hashem gave the authority to make halachic rulings to the Sages of each ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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3 votes

Having a mystical or "religious experience"

As stated in the comment above, Rabbi Tzvi Freeman writes: In our own lives, He remains silent only when we do not know how to listen. If you are waiting for a booming voice from the sky to answer ...
Shmuel's user avatar
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3 votes

Having a mystical or "religious experience"

The other answers are great. Just a small contribution: There is a perception amongst some that having a cataclysmic religious experience will make things religiously better. Or, at least, that having ...
bondonk's user avatar
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3 votes

Does God need us?

A bachur who had just arrived in yeshiva for his first day was speaking to the mashgiach to get settled, and during that conversation he asked the mashgiach “Is there a phone I can use? I need to call ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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3 votes

Why did God reveal himself only before there were recording devices?

Even had God waited until there were cameras and recording devices, there would always be skeptics who would deny it. However, if we define our terms we will find that there is no occasion for God to ...
Turk Hill's user avatar
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3 votes
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Plague of Hails

When Moses performed the miracles of the plagues, he would extend the staff toward whatever would be affected, in this case the sky. Moses spreading his hands to G-d does not necessarily mean a ...
N.T.'s user avatar
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3 votes

Are these verses about Hashem's anger a contradiction?

The Ahavat Yehonatan (on the Haftarah of Behar) explains that "forever" overhere means fifty years, as we find by a Jewish slave who goes free after the fiftieth year, even though it says ...
User123's user avatar
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3 votes

Can God Consider Himself to Be Wrong?

B"H The Bible has at least 2 places where God changes course or even regrets his actions. Does that mean God can consider Himself to be wrong? First of all: no. Second, I'm assuming you're ...
Awtsmoos--עצמות's user avatar
2 votes

Does God love non-Jews?

Another source: Tehillim 107 יודו לה' חסדו ונפלאותיו לבני אדם Let them praise the Lord for his steadfast love, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is being religious a duty if God chose to not have a proof to his existence in this world?

Perhaps it's backwards. Proof of His existence would force us to be religious. Something forced can't be considered a "duty*". Only when we are not forced, are we able to be commanded to use ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why does G-d, blessed be He, say that something did not enter His mind when He is all-knowing?

My understanding is that it did not enter His mind as a valid action. I.e. this is not something that He would ever consider a valid course of action. That's basically correct. Metzudas Dovid ...
shmosel's user avatar
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2 votes

How can we exist?

Interesting question. Let's look at this piece by piece. Positing that G.od is perfect; a change that he makes would mean that he was less or more perfect before the change came about. This does not ...
setszu's user avatar
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2 votes

How can a name exist before anything was Created

I heard this mashal in a shiur recently, which is based on a sicha or maamar in Chabad Chassidus, that helped me get a small handle on this very lofty idea. Firstly, the question of "what is His ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it commendable to be fearful of God's wrath?

R Weinberger is referring to a widely taught idea. We can see it in Tanach. Mishlei (3:11-12): מוסר ה' בני אל־תמאס ואל־תקץ בתוכחתו כי את־אשר יאהב ה' יוכיח וכאב את־בן ירצה Do not hate the scolding of ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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2 votes
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Man like God or separate from God

thanks for being here and asking questions that help you come closer to the God of Israel. I'll happily help you with this one. Generally, we base all our understanding of the Torah on the ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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2 votes

Source that we are inherently deserving

Possibly the famous dictum from Chazal: בשבילי נברא העולם The world was created for me (Sanhedrin 37a) In other words, even if we don't feel worthy, we must know that the world was created for us ...
Dov's user avatar
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2 votes

Source that we are inherently deserving

I think a good example of both sides of the debate is Kiddushin 36a: ״בָּנִים אַתֶּם לַה׳ אֱלֹהֵיכֶם״, בִּזְמַן שֶׁאַתֶּם נוֹהֲגִים מִנְהַג בָּנִים – אַתֶּם קְרוּיִם בָּנִים, אֵין אַתֶּם נוֹהֲגִים ...
chessprogrammer's user avatar
2 votes
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Where do our thoughts come from?

To say simply - yes they come from G-d would be an oversimplification. The Piacezna Rebbe says straight up in his Hachsharas HaAvreichim explains yes for the most part, assuming we are living a ...
Dov's user avatar
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2 votes

Who is THE LORD and who is my lord?

'The LORD' is Adonai. 'My lord' is the psalmist's human master. Rashi gives the traditional interpretation that David was speaking of Abraham: Our Rabbis interpreted it as referring to Abraham our ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
2 votes

Can God Consider Himself to Be Wrong?

This isn't a comprehensive theological answer to your question, but I wanted to expound, from a logical perspective, on something another user mentioned. It's explained that in order for Hashem to ...
Abraham Kahn's user avatar
1 vote

עוֹשֶׂה חֲדָשׁוֹת - what is this referring to?

In the commentary of Rabbi Moshe Cordevero תפלה למשה איש האלהים to the siddur, he explains that the phrase עוֹשֶׂה חֲדָשׁוֹת is referring specifically to the Sefirah of Chesed in seder histashelut as ...
Yaacov Deane's user avatar
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1 vote
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עוֹשֶׂה חֲדָשׁוֹת - what is this referring to?

Rabbi Efrem Goldberg has a great, ongoing series on the siddur. Here (you need to scroll down the list) in Episode 233 - Pesukei D’Zimra – Birchos Shema: L'Kayl Baruch (Part 3) he says the following: ...
Dov's user avatar
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1 vote
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Kabbalah/chasidus explanations of theodicy

One of the big chiddushim* of Kabbalah in theodicy is that both good and evil serve Hashem. When discussing the Yeitzer Hara, Rabbi Shimon tells the Chaveirim something that "they had never heard ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
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1 vote

Kabbalah/chasidus explanations of theodicy

According to Kabbalah the root of all evil is the שבירת הכלים. This the source of the "Husks/Shells" which are called cruel oppressors. You will see this referenced at the beginning of most ...
zunior's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it commendable to be fearful of God's wrath?

Rabbeinu Yonah Pirkei Avot (1:3) ויהא מורא שמים עליכם. לעבוד את ה' מיראה ומאהבה כעבד שעובד רבו מפני גדולתו ומעלה על דעתו שיכול לעונשו ונמצא משמשו מיראה לא מפני יראתו מן העונש אלא מפני גדולת הרב שיש ...
msj121's user avatar
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1 vote

Man like God or separate from God

Refer to the commentaries there. Rashi: היה כאחד ממנו. הֲרֵי הוּא יָחִיד בַּתַּחְתּוֹנִים כְּמוֹ שֶׁאֲנִי יָחִיד בָּעֶלְיוֹנִים, וּמַה הִיא יְחִידוּתוֹ? לָדַעַת טוֹב וָרָע, מַה שֶּׁאֵין כֵּן ...
Dov's user avatar
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