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Avodah Zarah 75b: ת"ר הלוקח כלי תשמיש מן העובדי כוכבים דברים שלא נשתמש בהן מטבילן והן טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י צונן כגון כוסות וקתוניות וצלוחיות מדיחן ומטבילן והם טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י חמין כגון היורות הקומקמוסון ומחמי חמין מגעילן ומטבילן והן טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י האור כגון השפודין והאסכלאות מלבנן ומטבילן והן טהורין The Rabbis taught ...


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The two issues, as I see it, are -- dipping in the mikvah, and any transfer of non-kosher taste. As for the mikvah -- if it belongs to a non-Jew and the Jew is just borrowing it, there's no obligation to dunk it. The obligation is only on Jewish-owned vessels. If the lender doesn't mind, I suppose you could borrow it and kasher it, which would take care of ...


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It seems from the Sefer Pischei Halacha page 100:25 that a cover of a utensil (non attached) does not require tevila (immersion in a Mikva) even though made out of metal. However, a cover of a pot which many times gets splattered by food will require tevila. See Rama YD 120 seif 5,Biur HaGra 15,and Aruch Hashulchan 32. It would seem that a wine stopper ...


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Yes it does. I have also asked this question over the years, presumably in similar circumstances. Someone goes in vacation, buys pots and pans for the duration of the vacation then wants to leave them behind. Here are the answers I received from two rabbanim. If you are buying regular pots and pans, manufactured by non-Jews, they need tevila. If regular ...


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Gra in his commentary to Yoreh De’ah 120:2 explains that this is in fact a difference of opinion between Rambam and Shulchan Aruch, which hinges on how to explain Mikva’ot 8:4: הָאוֹחֵז בְּאָדָם וּבְכֵלִים וּמַטְבִּילָן, טְמֵאִין. וְאִם הֵדִיחַ אֶת יָדוֹ בַּמַּיִם, טְהוֹרִים. רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן אוֹמֵר, יְרַפֶּה, כְּדֵי שֶׁיָּבֹאוּ בָהֶם מָיִם.‏ If ...


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All opinions exist, as R Michael J Broyde reports in an article in Hakirah vol. 26 p. 146 (Are Converts to Judaism Required to Immerse Their Utensils after Conversion?) Avenei Nezer and Shem MiShmuel rule it is not required as the convert's dishes get immersed with him/her metaphysically once (s)he converts R Ovadia Yosef rules it is not required since the ...


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Both opinions are quoted in Shulchan Arukh YD 121:2. Commentaries there discuss reasons, background and applications.


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Chagigah 27a gives two explanations of the Sages' opinion: They are actually arguing against R. Eliezer. They believe that the altars are susceptible to impurity, and are not viewed like the ground, because they are coated with metal. They are saying the following to R. Eliezer: "Why do you need to compare the altars to the ground in order to render them ...


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Short answer: Likely yes. General Rule: Any utensil that comes in direct contact with food requires tevila. Main Exceptions: Items that are completely made out of unglazed earthenware, wood, or plastic. Disposable items. Utensils that were never owned by a non-jew. Assuming it is not covered by any of the exceptions, whether or not it needs to be ...


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The water heater is connected to the ground by the plumbing (mahuber l'karka) and possibly, bolted down as well.


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The Shulchan Aruch brings down the Beracha in YD 120:3. Be’er HaGolah quotes the Tur ibid. and the Mordechai at the end of Avodah Zarah as his source. The Bi’ur HaGra cites the famous teaching that all mitzvos get a beracha beforehand as the rationale. But it doesn’t seem that the Gemara ever explicitly prescribes a specific beracha for this specific ...


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This article by R. Avi Zakutinsky discusses which kinds of materials need immersion in a mikvah: When describing the obligation to purify and immerse utensils that were owned and used by non-Jews the Torah mentions only six types of metals; Gold, Silver, Copper, Iron, Tin and Lead. These items need immersion on a biblical level. The poskim discuss whether ...


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