14

Shevet HaLevi 6:245:2 rules that he would have to tovel them with a bracha. He doesn't distinguish if they were toveled already beforehand and I fail to see why that would make a difference. Tzitz Eliezer 22:49 rules that they should be toveled without a bracha, reasoning that perhaps the tevillah of the person works to 'elevate' him along with all his ...


14

In Hilchos Tevilas Keilim by Rav Dov Cohen, he brings sources which permit eating using untoveled keilim in someone else's house, although, if memory serves, R. Moshe Feinstein forbade it. It should be noted, that according to Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky and others, one is not obligated to tovel glazed crockery at all, as noted here. Rav Eliezer Melamed notes ...


13

Tevilath Kelim (by R. Zvi Cohen) 8:6 says that you shouldn't immerse it. In the footnote there he cites Mekor Chaim 14, who says that this is because the giver didn't buy the utensil with the intent to use it for food preparation. (CYLOR, of course.)


11

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


9

Only kelim (vessels) which absorbed issur (forbidden substances) need to be kashered. A kli which may have issur stuck to the surface, but not absorbed should be scrubbed. Keilim which were only used with kosher are clear to be toiveled. See Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 121. Another point concerning old keilim is to make sure there is nothing on the surface ...


8

What obligates something for immersion is that it is a utensil for eating with or preparing food with "כלי סעודה" Anything else has no obligation. See Shulchan Yoreh Deah 120:1, Aruch HaShulchan 120:30. Example. A mohel needs to peel a orange and the only knife he has to use is his mila knife. So while yes it's a metal utensil, and yes it can be used for ...


8

Only vessels owned by Jews have to be toiveled. Since the Glenfidich owners are probably non-Jews they don't have to toivel their machinery - and even if they did it would be meaningless.


8

The Kof-K list of tevila instructions says that, according to the OU, Star-K and CRC, a corkscrew does not require tevilah because it does not touch the food. The Star-K confirms. And so does R Forst on behalf of OU. Not clear why it would need to be kashered. The prohibition is on drinking non-kosher wine. If (1) the corkscrew is clean and (2) it was cold ...


7

There is a machloket Rishonim if one can dip straight into 40 se'ah of snow. The Mordechai (Mo'ed 332) quotes 3 opinions on the matter: Rabbeinu Shemarya says its perfectly fine, Rabbeinu Eliezer says it's no good, and Rabbeinu Simcha says you shouldn't do it because since it is not a liquid, you can't ensure that every part of the object is touching the ...


7

Yechave Da'as 4-44 based on the Bais Yosef – a person may dine in a restaurant or hotel where the dishes were not Toiveled. The reason is since the dishes were initially purchased for commercial purposes – to earn a profit – rather than for private use, therefore they do not have to be Toiveled. However a guest in a private home, where the dishes have not ...


7

Another possibility might just be to use a local pond or lake. (Rivers or streams are a possibility too, but there are more halachic issues with those, involving issues of how much groundwater vs. rainwater they contain.) Those generally aren't usable for human mikvaos because of the lack of privacy, but that wouldn't apply to dishes.


6

What you are asking - whether smoking can be considered eating/drinking - is actually the subject of a disagreement in the Rishonim. Tosafos (AZ 66b) directly imply that smoking is considered drinking. The Rif (Chullin 32 [in Rif pages]) directly implies otherwise. This all comes to the fore in the Halachic question of ריחא מלתא - whether 'scent is a thing', ...


6

TL;DR: Consult your LOR. The CRC's website has a convenient chart of items that need toiveling, and for those that can't be toiveled, what should be done. For example: Coffee Maker - Glass parts - Tevilla. Machine - "clean well, do not use for 24 hours, and then run through one cycle" (Note that the CRC includes this paragraph:) Under no circumstances ...


6

Rule #7 on the list at the top half of this article from the Star-K, identifying what types of items do not require Tevillah, seems to answer my question. "Utensils used exclusively with raw, non-edible food, for instance cookie cutters or a metal tenderizer hammer do not need tevila."


6

R' Usher Weiss shlita (Minchas Osher) argues that he doesn't have to, based on the Chazon Ish's principle (Shvi'is 7) that if there's a halacha that comes up all the time and is not a fringe case, and nobody (mishna, gemoro, rishonim, poskim) mentions it, that is an indication that there is no such halacha. This is such a case, since it's relevant every time ...


6

In terms of the dipping itself: You should make sure that the entire vessel, as it is intended to be used, is immersed. That means that if pieces are meant to come apart, you should separate them, and you should make sure that the water gets into everywhere that it needs to get. This sometimes involves turning things upside down to release air-bubble ...


6

This is a machloket in Chulin 31a. נדה שנאנסה וטבלה אמר רב יהודה אמר רב טהורה לביתה ואסורה לאכול בתרומה ור' יוחנן אמר אף לביתה לא טהרה A nidah who did not intend to tovel (will be explained later): Rav Yehudah said in the name of Rav that she is pure for "her house" (i.e. to be with her husband), but still isn't able to eat trumah. Rabi Yochanan said ...


6

From the Star-K website: Utensils require tevila without a brocha when the dishes or vessels are made from glazed china, bone china, stoneware, corning ware, or porcelain enamel. Other vessels requiring tevila without a brocha include: Utensils made from a combination of materials, e.g. metal pots coated with teflon or enamel... From the Kof-K ...


6

As with many questions of this type, the answer is "it is a machlokes" You would have to consult your specific Rav. The OU actually goes into some details on this. What’s the Truth about . . . the Sale of Chametz on Pesach? The utensils themselves present more of a challenge. The question of what to do with chametzdik, non-kasherable dishes is ...


6

I just called Washington Heights Keilim mikvah. Located on Bennet Ave. between W. 185 St and W. 186 St. Manhattan. Phone: 212 923 3582 The woman told me that the entrance is to the right of the shul. There is a black gate. The gate requires a code which is written in Hebrew on the gate (Thanks Monica, for confirming this), with the Hebrew letters ...


6

First Kasher them and then dunk them in the Mikva. (ShA YD 121:2) If you did it the wrong way some say you have to dunk them again.


6

Avodah Zarah 75b: ת"ר הלוקח כלי תשמיש מן העובדי כוכבים דברים שלא נשתמש בהן מטבילן והן טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י צונן כגון כוסות וקתוניות וצלוחיות מדיחן ומטבילן והם טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י חמין כגון היורות הקומקמוסון ומחמי חמין מגעילן ומטבילן והן טהורין דברים שנשתמש בהן ע"י האור כגון השפודין והאסכלאות מלבנן ומטבילן והן טהורין The Rabbis taught ...


5

See this article by R. Aryeh Lebowitz, discussing the very similar case of purchasing a dish which has been pre-filled with candies to give as a gift, which I think addresses most of your questions. I am going to answer the questions in reverse order, as I think the logic is easier to see this way. If I don't immerse the dish, may the recipient use the ...


5

CYLOR regarding following R' Dovid Miller's instructions. If I remember correcty, he allows the use of tap water through a rubber connection. Nowadays, most do not rely on this, but may be lenient for rabbinic or keli use.


5

Practically speaking, no food is ever placed directly on the oven rack save for bread to be warmed or toasted. As such one can rely on Rabbi Moshe Feinstein who says in his Igros Moshe Yoreh Deah 3 siman 24 that toasters don't need tevila being that you are not cooking or preparing the bread, but rather just drying it. And while its true that this drying is ...


4

As a child, when my parents would buy a sandwich maker or something of the sorts, we would give the ownership to our Non-Jewish friend and use it in our house. Our friend always gave us permission to use it ;)


4

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Chapter 162 (translation here) talks about ritual immersion in a river, and cautions that according to many Rabbis, if the river's water is from rainwater (and not a spring) it is not valid. See there for more details.


4

The OU has the following on their website. Secondly, the determination of tevilah depends on the owner's designated use for the object: a utensil purchased for non-food purposes and occasionally used to hold food (such as a screwdriver which might be used in a pinch in the absence of a fork) does not require tevilah (Aruch Hashulchan, Y.D. 120:40) ...


4

According to the Orthodox Union, kashrut.com, and askmoses.com, a saltshaker needs immersion, and that need is definite enough that we say the b'racha on the immersion. However, that's assuming it's of metal (or glass). According to those pages, unglazed ceramic/earthenware does not require immersion and glazed ceramic (porcelain) requires immersion, but ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible