9

To answer the last part of the question that wasn't addressed yet. Is there any significance as to why a specific stone was assigned to a specific tribe? Was it something within the color, or the texture or strength of the stone that made it appropriate? "Hoshen," by ברי"א. Used with permission per CC BY-SA 2.5 This is Rabbeinu Bechaye's explanation. I ...


8

Rav Ovadia Yosef said a great pshat.Moshe Rabbeinu says מחני נא מספרך לב. וְעַתָּה אִם תִּשָּׂא חַטָּאתָם וְאִם אַיִן מְחֵנִי נָא מִסִּפְרְךָ אֲשֶׁר כָּתָבְתָּ: He says one could read it מחני נא מספר כ.which means erase me from sefer kaf which equals 20 and the 20th parsha is tzaveh so Moshes plea was granted.


6

On a peshat level: A parsha (actually a sidra) is the portion set up to read in a particular Shabbat, as set up in Bavel. In Eretz Yisrael, they had a different division, of a third the size (called a parsha). I would therefore assume that in Eretz Yisrael, there were a good many "parshiyot" that did not have Moshe's name, and so, Tetzaveh was in no way ...


5

There are a few opinions about the order of the names on the stones (Rashi says that they were ordered by age, from top-right to bottom-left), while Da'at Zekenim miBa'alei haTosfot think that the order is by their mothers (i.e. first all of Leah's sons, then Bilha, etc.). These two opinions can be found here. As for the connection of each stone to a ...


3

From Wikipedia here: The priestly sash or girdle (Hebrew avnet אַבְנֵט) was part of the ritual garments worn by the Jewish and priests of ancient Israel whenever they served in the Tabernacle or the Temple in Jerusalem. The "sash" or "girdle" worn by the High Priest was of fine linen with "embroidered work" in blue, purple and scarlet (Exodus 28:39, 39:29); ...


3

The historical elision of a vowel preceding ד could explain the absence of a dagesh qal within it. Similar phenomena are seen in words like בִּנְפֹל and מַלְכֵי. The latter probably was pronounced like malak̲e at some point, since the absolute plural form מְלָכִים has an a vowel before k̲. See, for instance, p. 40 from Greenstein's "An Introduction to the ...


3

Radak (Y'sha'ya 28:4) comments that ציץ is the masculine form and ציצית is the feminine form: נזכר בלשון זכר ציץ ובלשון נקבה ציצית The Zohar (Sh'lach 174b) likewise notes this. The Zohar understands this connection as representing a kabbalistic dichotomy where ציצית represents the feminine aspects of Creation and the physical world while the ציץ ...


2

Maimonides (Hil' Klei Mikdash, Ch.9:8-13), describes there being two rings on the Shoham settings, onto which the ends of the cable would be fastened. Kesef Mishnah describes the details in law 11 of Maimonides as being 'explained in the verses'. I do not understand where he finds evidence for the upper rings of the shoulder straps. (Credit sam for source!) ...


2

There are minor pieces subject to tearing (like the techeles strands of the tzitz and the ephod), but those are easily replaced and aren't intrinsic to the remainder of the beged. Most of the other begadim of the Kohen Gadol contain metal strands or are actually made of metal, making them difficult to "tear" - you would have to cut them. The other begadim ...


2

I spoke about this with my friend and he said something that I feel cogently brings together all of Nahmanides' citations, which I will list: The incense stops the plague (Shabbos 89a) The incense is with the attribute of judgement,They shall place incense in your nostrils (Deut. 33:10), and And my nostrils shall flare (31:17). By the foreign incense Before ...


2

There is an institute in Jerusalem that seeks to recreate them to have them ready at some point in the future. Otherwise, using them today is misguided. At the bare minimum, they contained a mix of wool and linen, which is prohibited to wear unless specifically commanded to do so, i.e. by priests in the Temple. Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan notes this in his ...


1

The question is based on a false premise! There is no connection between Tetzave and Moshe Rabbeinu's Yahrzeit as far as setting the calendar is concerned. While it often happens that 7-Adar is during the week of the Tetzave Torah reading, it sometimes happens not that way. E.g. in 1977 2001 7-Adar was on Friday before Terumah. In 2029 and 2032 it will be ...


1

The Ark contained the Tablets and represents the idea of studying and observing Torah. The word “eifod” (אפד) has the numerical value of 85, which spells the word “peh” (פ=80, ה=5) — “mouth” — and is a hint for Torah Sheba’al Peh — the Oral Torah. With the plural expression, Hashem is alluding to the fact that both the Written and Oral Torah belong to Klal ...


1

Keli Yakar to 28:6 says that only the Ephod and the Aron as well were constructed by the entire nation, since they come to atone for Avodah Zarah (Arachin 16), which the whole nation sinned in at the Ma'aseh Ha'egel. However, for the other garments, as well as the other vessels of the Mishkan, it remains in the singular form (presumably aimed at Moshe).


1

Welcome, and great question! This is one of the many questions that Ramban (Shemot 28:31) asks on Rashi (and others), and he therefore rejects their opinion. However, in responding to Ramban, Mizrachi (28:33) asks right back - what's wrong with pomegranates? If it had said another fruit, you would have asked the same question: ואיני רואה מקום לאלה ...


1

The verse in Exodus 27:20 is translated as follows: וְאַתָּ֞ה תְּצַוֶּ֣ה ׀ אֶת־בְּנֵ֣י יִשְׂרָאֵ֗ל וְיִקְח֨וּ אֵלֶ֜יךָ שֶׁ֣מֶן זַ֥יִת זָ֛ךְ כָּתִ֖ית לַמָּא֑וֹר לְהַעֲלֹ֥ת נֵ֖ר תָּמִֽיד׃ You shall further instruct the Israelites to bring you clear oil of beaten olives for lighting, for kindling lamps regularly. The word תָּמִֽיד is translated ...


1

It says in Likutei Sichos for example, parshas Terumah volume 3 section 7: "In parshas Yisro, it speaks about the giving of the Torah, where there was the accomplishment of the connection of spirituality with the physical, the combining of "upper" and "lower". And the same idea (although with a slight addition {see later}), was this also in ...


1

It doesn't apply only to the me'il. Rambam (Hilchos Klei Hamikdash 9:3) says: והקורע פי המעיל לוקה שנאמר לא יקרע והוא הדין לכל בגדי כהונה שהקורען דרך השחתה לוקה One who tears the border of the opening of the cloak is liable for lashes, as [Exodus 28:32] states: "It shall not be torn." This applies to all the priestly garments. One who tears them ...


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