21

I Samuel 16:11 and Psalms 118:22 imply that David was a rejected child in his family. וַיֹּ֨אמֶר שְׁמוּאֵ֣ל אֶל־יִשַׁי֮ הֲתַ֣מּוּ הַנְּעָרִים֒ וַיֹּ֗אמֶר ע֚וֹד שָׁאַ֣ר הַקָּטָ֔ן וְהִנֵּ֥ה רֹעֶ֖ה בַּצֹּ֑אן וַיֹּ֨אמֶר שְׁמוּאֵ֤ל אֶל־יִשַׁי֙ שִׁלְחָ֣ה וְקָחֶ֔נּוּ כִּ֥י לֹא־נָסֹ֖ב עַד־בֹּא֥וֹ פֹֽה׃ Then Samuel asked Jesse, “Are these all the boys you ...


12

2 Samuel 15:12 "And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David's counsellor, from his city, from Giloh, as he offered the sacrifices. And the conspiracy was strong, and the people with Absalom were steadily increasing." The "friend" who betrays King David, that is mentioned in Psalms 41:10 (41:9 in Christian Bibles), and Psalms 55:14-15 (13-14, in ...


9

The Ibn Ezra says that the author is referring to the fact that his parents abandon him in their death, עזבוני במותם, ואתה אספתני תמיד Whereas the Malbim says that it has to do with David's feeling about how hashem has helped him, and he likens himself to an orphan who has been taken in and shown graciousness by God ממשיל א''ע כיתום שעזבוהו אביו ואמו ...


6

Newer editions of the Koren Tanach also mark kamatz katan, and they agree with the siddur and mark this one as kamatz katan as well. Here's what they have to say about it in the back: באותו אופן הבדלנו בין הקמץ הרגיל לקמץ הקטן באמצעות סימן גדול לקמץ הקטן, למשל, חכמה. כידוע, ישנו הבדל בין מסורת הקריאה הספרדית לאופן הקריאה שהמליצה עליו האקדמיה. כל הקמצים ...


5

This verse is referring to a wicked man. If you see a wicked man getting rich, do not wonder how is it so, for he does not take his riches when he dies. And the 'fear' here is that a person may fear that it seems like there is no reward and punishment for good and bad, because he sees a wicked man who is enjoying life. So the Tehillim says "Do not fear", ...


5

While the sources cited by rosends refer to an "abandonment" which might occur at some point during a persons life, but which could possibly be avoided in particular circumstances, Rashi suggests that it refers to an innate element of human existence which is present from the moment of conception: כי אבי ואמי עזבוני - בשעת תשמיש להנאתן נתכוונו כיון שגמרו ...


4

Rashi on Tehillim 81:17 explains and… from a rock: He sated them with honey when they went in His ways, as the matter that is stated (Deut. 32:13): “He suckled them with honey from the rock.” This is part of the analogy in the Torah as to the blessings of fertility given to the land of Israel. Haazinu 32:12 He made them ride upon the high places of ...


4

Nusach Ashkenaz starts the night of 1 Elul as they say it at Maariv & Shacharis. Nusach Sefard starts the morning of 1 Elul as they say it at Shacharis & Mincha.


4

Regarding שִׁיר הַמַּעֲלוֹת: the Mishna Brerua 267:1 connects it to Tachanun, so that even on Erev Shabbat afer Mincha-time (1/2 hour afternoon) on already replaces עַל נַהֲרוֹת בָּבֶל with שִׁיר הַמַּעֲלוֹתת. א) אין נופלין - מפני שהוא סמוך להכנסת שבת כ"כ הלבוש וכתב הפמ"ג ונראה דה"ה כשמתפללים מנחה גדולה אחר חצות נמי אין נופלים ע"פ וכן מי שאוכל פת אחר ...


4

I’d like to propose an answer of my own, which I have not seen anyone say, based on the continuation of the Pesukim: “Hashem is righteous in all His ways...Hashem is close to those who call Him, to those who call Him sincerely. The will (רצון) of those who fear Him He does, and their cries He hears, and He saves them, etc.” Bamidbar Rabbah 11:7: כָּתוּב ...


4

“Umasbi'a lechol chai ratzon – …and cause satisfaction for every living being…” At this point, attempts to parse the grammar falter. “Ratzon” can means desire, as we see in a few verses, “Retzon yerei'av ya'aseh – He performs the desires of those who feel awe for Him.” Or it could mean desirability, as in the end of the Amidah: “Yihyu leratzon imrei fi – May ...


3

In his commentary to Berachot 4b, R. Ezekiel Landau notes that the word רצון used in this verse appears out of place. If the verse was referring to every creature receiving all of its sustenance needs it should have used the word מזון or שובע which would directly mean that. R. Landau therefore argues that the word רצון suggests that it is referring not to ...


3

Actually, the Chomath Anach - חומת אנך quoting the Sefer Eretz Chaim on this verse לְדָוִ֗ד מִ֫זְמ֥וֹר נְאֻ֤ם ה' ׀ לַֽאדֹנִ֗י שֵׁ֥ב לִֽימִינִ֑י עַד־אָשִׁ֥ית אֹ֝יְבֶ֗יךָ הֲדֹ֣ם לְרַגְלֶֽיךָ explains that the qualifying monarchs in each generation - up to and including Mashiach - will be granted the privilege of שֵׁב לִימִינִי. The חומת אנך himself adds that ...


3

Time: Reciting Tehillim at night 1) The Mishne Bruro (Shaar Hatzion §238) brings a machlokes between the באר היטב and מגן אברהם whether it is permitted to read 'מקרא' at night. The MB writes that even according to those who say not to, it isn't prohibited, just that it is preferable to say it during the day. (Those who don't allow it are based on the ...


3

I give some possible translations in my book, Treasure of Shabbat: An Illuminated Guide to the Shabbat Table Experience: Finding Meaning and Inspiration through Shabbat Observance at Home.


3

It's God's name, followed by the word "סַלְעִי". We don't use the correct pronunciation of this one of God's names, substituting something like /ʔadoˈnaj/. "סַלְעִי" is something like /salˈʕi/. But pronunciation varies from person to person, as in any language. (Incidentally, this phrase appears in the third, not the second, verse of that psalm. For some ...


3

There are some interesting explanations to כֹּ֣ל הַ֭נְּשָׁמָה that you will find here. All of them refer to humanity, not to animals: Ibn Ezra views the entire Pslam in terms of its original aspect that it was sung and played on the harp (with probably accompanying instruments such as the ugav, cymbals, etc.) as stated in the words of the Psalm itself. ...


2

Rashi to Iyyov 1:5 writes that when a verse wishes to describe something which is in the present and ongoing, it will sometimes use the past tense (and sometimes the future).


2

Rashi (v. 16) explains: אך אלהים יפדה נפשי. אבל אני שהטיתי למשל אזני, אלהים יפדה נפשי שלא אלך אל שאול כי יקחני בחיי ללכת בדרכיו: “But G-d will redeem my soul” - but I, that I turned my ear to the parable, G-d will redeem my soul; for I will not go to Sheol, for He will take me in my life to go in His ways. In other words: while money can’t redeem ...


2

Maurice has listed a wealth of sources that seem to collude on the idea that for the most part, one may pray in whatever language one understands. So, your question raises a good point. If your more comfortable with English, how do you know that your getting an accurate translation of the Hebrew? There's no 100% guarantee, but, I think you need to ...


2

I heard [myself saying] once: משביע לכל חי רצון can mean (in Hebrew) "providing/making everyone [to] desire]". The very idea that we want things is not trivial as it might seem, some people get so distressed and depressed they totally lose their desires. So G-d provides all with desires (as opposed to "fulfilling those desires").


2

Rambam Hilchot Temidin uMusafim 6:5-8 (translation from chabad.org): וְאַחַר הַחֲבִיתִין מַעֲלִין אֶת הַיַּיִן לְנִסּוּךְ. וּבִשְׁעַת הַנִּסּוּךְ אוֹמְרִין הַלְוִיִּם הַשִּׁיר. וּמַכִּין הַמְשׁוֹרְרִין בְּמִינֵי נִגּוּן שֶׁבַּמִּקְדָּשׁ וְתוֹקְעִין תֵּשַׁע תְּקִיעוֹת עַל פִּרְקֵי הַשִּׁיר:‏ כְּשֶׁהָיוּ נוֹתְנִין הַיַּיִן לַמְנַסֵּךְ. הָיוּ שְׁנֵי ...


2

Rashi explains that it is a reference to the beraita quoted in Rosh HaShanah 32a, which derives the content of the first three blessings of the amidah from the opening words of Tehillim 29.


1

I saw a number of answers among the meforshim. They all translate the Pasuk differently, minimizing the difficulty. 1) Metzudas David: You open Your hand and satisfy all the living according to its desire (as in bread for people, hay for horses, plankton for fish). 2) Malbim: Your [exercise of] Ratzon satisfies all the living. (Or possibly, When You have ...


1

Check out "Max Tawil Tehillim Lesson- I" on this page: http://www.pizmonim.org/section.php?maqam=Tehillim There are other sources that explain the logic of the grammar better, but this is a "real tradition". (The middle eastern communities have 3 separate tunes for Iyyov, Mishlei, and Tehillim by the way. Eshet Hayil is read with the Mishlei tune on Erev ...


1

Being that others seem opposed to posting this for some reason, I wanted to make one more simple note about this Machlokes which answers the question: In footnote 26 of the Koren article linked above, it records Di Lonzano's back and forth with Minchat Shai about this question. Di Lonzano suggests that a reason for the reading of "Kal" here would be that ...


1

The consensus is that public prayer can be in any language, but private prayer must be in Hebrew. Below is a compendium of what various commentators said: Mishnah Sotah 7:1 These are said in any language: The portion of the Sotah, the confession over tithes, the reading of the Shema, tefillah [Amida], the grace after meals, the oath relating to testimony ...


1

The Talmud (Rosh Hashana 8a, 34a) states: תקעו בחדש שופר בכסה ליום חגנו איזהו חג שהחדש מתכסה בו הוי אומר זה ר"ה Which is the Festival day on which the moon is covered, i.e., hidden? You must say that this is Rosh HaShana, which is the only Festival that occurs at the beginning of a month, when the moon cannot be seen. (Sefaria) It refers to Rosh ...


1

'Sforno says that this Psalm is dedicated to the future king Messiah. He is on God’s right hand and the ministering angels are on the left. The armies of Gog and Magog will attack, but HaShem will subdue them until they come crawling to the feet of the Messiah.' (Artscroll Tenach Commentary) See further Avot d'Rav Natan 34:4.


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