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11

A barayta (Berachot 31a) says (translations edited from link): תנו רבנן אין עומדין להתפלל לא מתוך עצבות ולא מתוך עצלות ולא מתוך שחוק ולא מתוך שיחה ולא מתוך קלות ראש ולא מתוך דברים בטלים אלא מתוך שמחה של מצוה The Sages taught: One may neither stand to pray from sorrow nor from laziness, nor from laughter, nor from conversation, nor from frivolity, nor ...


8

See https://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Putting_On_and_Removing_Tefillin The minhag is to put on Tefillin in the Synagogue after having said Birchot HaShachar and Birchot HaTorah but preferably before the Shema in Korbanot and at least before Parshat HaTamid. Kaf Hachaim 25,3-4 The minimum requirement is to have Tefillin on during Kriyat Shema and ...


8

Two basic answers exist to this question: In reality, when the calendar was decided by testimony of the new moon, this phrase probably did not exist in the prayers. Maseches Sofrim 19:4 writes: בחג שבועות אומר ביום טוב מקרא קודש הזה וביום חג השבועות הזה וערבית שחרית ומנחה שוין בתפלות In fact, the Ritva (to Shabbos 86b) and Rivash (Shut no. 96) imply ...


8

According to this website, the custom in the Jewish Tunisian community is to recite the "Eishet Chayil", after the reading of "Shir Hashirim" (Song of Songs) and in the Djerba community to recite it during the weeks of Sefirat HaOmer. [In many Sefardic communities, "Shir Hashirim" is recited weekly, after "Kabbalat Shabbat", before "Arvit". Some of the ...


8

No, not according to the answer on this site: Although it is preferable to join a minyan where this is possible, both Kol Nidrei and Yizkor can be recited in private. The reason for this is that neither are considered a “davar shebikdusha” that requires a minyan.


8

While the Arizal does indeed say that A) one should stand for Vayivarech David, and B) that one should give tzedakah standing during Vayivarech David, these customs are not dependent on one another. The Kaf HaChaim (OC 51:43 quotes the Arizal on standing during Vayivarech David as follows: וכ"כ האר"י ז"ל בשער הכוונות בענין תפלת השחר די"ח ע"ג וז"ל צריך ...


7

The rules try to keep the date for requesting rain in the late fall. They are not perfect. No rule would be except adding the ever-changing long decimal tropical year length. If we were to take a simple rule and start requesting rain always 365 days after the previous time, we'd end up shifting a day earlier every four years. If we were to do that, but ...


7

Thank you for asking the question and performing this great action. In his book Mourning in Halacha (pp. 29-46), Rabbi Chaim Binyamin Goldberg has a number of recommendations based on Jewish law which would apply to your visits. It is desirable to explain to the patient that illness in this world is a kindness which the Holy One bestowed for mankind. The ...


7

A yeshiva.co article titled "Reciting Brachos in the Presence of Unpleasant Odors" addresses a very similar scenario: Only substances whose malodor results from decomposition prohibit reciting a bracha, but not inherently foul-smelling items, such as pitch (Chayei Odom 3:12; Mishnah Berurah 79:23). According to this ruling, one may recite a bracha in the ...


7

Rav Yehoshua ibn Shu’ib, Rabbi Mordecai ben Abraham Benet, and the Mateh Moshe (Laws of Shavuot 690) explain that for this reason the more general word 'time' is used instead of the more precise 'day' (the term usually used to refer to a one day holiday), because it hasn't always been the exact day, but it always is in the general time frame of Matan Torah. ...


7

This question is discussed in Chevel Nachalato 8:13, where a number of contemporary Rabbis' approaches are presented. R. Avigdor Nebenzahl writes that he knows of no good answer to the question, but does note some hints to the shtei halechem, such as Chabad's text of ושני שעירים לכפר as part of musaf. R. Ya'akov Epstein suggests that there is a hesitance ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch rules (O.C. 294:1) that in general one need not repeat Shemonah Esrei for forgetting Atah Chonantanu. The exception where one does have to repeat it is if he also ate before making havdalah on wine: ואם טעה ולא הבדיל משלים תפלתו ואינו חוזר מפני שצריך להבדיל על הכוס ואם טעם קודם שהבדיל על הכוס צריך לחזור ולהבדיל בתפלה Given that if ...


7

Rabinu Bachya in Kad HaKemach Here writes that ברוך means the source of blessings, מקור הברכה - all blessing come from him. While מבורך means he is blessed by all, מבורך בפי כל - all his creations recognize that blessing is received through him.


7

Actually there is a debate in Orach Chayim 622:1 between the Sefardi and the Ashkenazi practice (as pointed out by DoubleAA in comment): למנחה אומר אשרי ובא לציון ואין אומרים ואני תפלתי אפילו אם חל להיות בשבת:‏ הגה: ואין אנו נוהגין לומר אשרי ובא לציון קודם מנחה רק קודם נעילה וכן כתבו קצת רבוותא (מרדכי והגהות מיימוני סוף ספר אהבה וסוף הלכות יום ...


7

While not precisely the same case, I believe this is included in this halacha (O.C. 268:6): הטועה בתפל' שבת והחליף של זו בזו אינו חוזר One who makes a mistake in the Shabbos prayers and switches one for the other (e.g. shacharis for mincha), he does not go back. The Mishna Brura there (14) explains: (יד) אינו חוזר - שעיקר ברכה רביעית היא רצה ...


6

tl;dr - it's kabbalah (likely), or it's to reject karaites (highly unlikely), it's coincidental because the evening prayer is optional (very likely). To me, the most likely option is that this is based on Kabbalah, although for the opposite reason of what you suggest (not because angels only say it during the day, but because they only say it at night). ...


6

Riva on Torah, Shemos 8:26: ויעתר אל ה'. כאן במכת ערוב ובמכת ארבה נאמ' ויעתר שהוא לשון רבוי תפלה כמו שפרש"י בפרשת תולדות מה שאין כן בשאר המכות כגון מכת ברד וצפרדעים שנא' בברד ויפרש כפיו אל ה' וצפרדעים ויצעק משה והטעם לפי שאמרו רבותינו גמירי מיהב יהיב משקל לא שקיל ומשה היה חפץ שלא ישאר אחד מהם כדי שלא יהנו המצרים לא בעור ולא בבשר. ועל כן הוצרך משה להרבות ...


6

Mishnah Brurah 93 s.k. 2 writes: האר"י ז"ל היה מתפלל מתוך הסידור כדי שיכוין מאוד גם שלא להבליע נקודה והכל לפי מה שמרגיש האדם בנפשו Loosely translated: The Arizal would pray using a siddur in order to aid in concentration and pronunciation, but generally speaking whether or not to use a siddur depends on what the individual feels will benefit his ...


6

Newer editions of the Koren Tanach also mark kamatz katan, and they agree with the siddur and mark this one as kamatz katan as well. Here's what they have to say about it in the back: באותו אופן הבדלנו בין הקמץ הרגיל לקמץ הקטן באמצעות סימן גדול לקמץ הקטן, למשל, חכמה. כידוע, ישנו הבדל בין מסורת הקריאה הספרדית לאופן הקריאה שהמליצה עליו האקדמיה. כל הקמצים ...


6

You asked elsewhere regarding the moments before death so I understand this question to apply right after death. The traditional Jewish practices right after death have been described here by Rabbi Maurice Lamm. Relevant to your question on blessings and songs, the traditional approach is not to touch the corpse until one is truly sure of the death to close ...


6

Historically a non-shomer Shabbat Jew did not count as part of a minyan, however in recent generations, a number of halachic decisors taught that the status of Shabbat-desecrators is different today. They do not desecrate Shabbat to defy God but as part of a general movement of non-observance. As such many prominent poskim agree they can be counted. See R ...


6

The general attitude towards prayers of non-Jews is from Isiah 57.7: כי ביתי בית תפילה יקרא לכל העמים -- For My House shall be called a House of Prayer for all the nations. Brachos The Rema paskens that one should respond 'Amen' to the blessings of a non-Jew, providing one heard the entire blessing. A non-Jew should not say anything false in his ...


6

The simple answer to the question in your title is yes. As Rambam explains in Mishnah Torah, Hilchot Tefillah v'Birchat Kohanim, Chapter 1, halacha 2: וּלְפִיכָךְ נָשִׁים וַעֲבָדִים חַיָּבִין בִּתְפִלָּה לְפִי שֶׁהִיא מִצְוַת עֲשֵׂה שֶׁלֹּא הַזְּמַן גְּרָמָא אֶלָּא חִיּוּב מִצְוָה זוֹ כָּךְ הוּא שֶׁיְּהֵא אָדָם מִתְחַנֵּן וּמִתְפַּלֵּל בְּכָל יוֹם ...


5

I don't know about responsa, but it's an entire Siman in Shulchan Aruch - and it's called Pores Al Shma - Orach Chaim 69 - דין פורס על שמע. In short: Once the tenth man arrives, one says Kadish, Borchu, (the bracha of Yotzer according to the Mechaber, but not the Remo) and then Chazarat Hashatz. In the original: אם יש בני אדם שהתפללו כל אחד בפ"ע ביחיד ...


5

“Umasbi'a lechol chai ratzon – …and cause satisfaction for every living being…” At this point, attempts to parse the grammar falter. “Ratzon” can means desire, as we see in a few verses, “Retzon yerei'av ya'aseh – He performs the desires of those who feel awe for Him.” Or it could mean desirability, as in the end of the Amidah: “Yihyu leratzon imrei fi – May ...


5

The Halocho is to be found in Sh O, O Ch 53 (12) who paskens like the gemoro אין ממנין מי שקור' לאלפי"ן עייני"ן ולעייני"ן אלפי"ן: One should not appoint a person [to be leader] who reads "aleph"s like "ayin"s and "ayin"s like "aleph"s. The Mishna Beruro (37) says {excerpt} ואם כולם מדברים כך מותר להיות ש"ץ [מ"א בשם הרדב"ז] And if ...


5

The Aruch Hashulchan, when discussing birchat hamazon (ערוך השולחן אורח חיים סימן קפז) writes in se'if 4: ולי נראה שנוסחתינו מכוונת יותר דהכוונה של חן חסד רחמים נ"ל דהנה ג' מדרגות יש בבני אדם יש עשירים גדולים וזהו בחן על דרך ונח מצא חן כלומר השפעה יתירה ויש בעלי בתים ממוצעים שכל מה שצריכים משיגים בנקל ואין להם מותרות וזהו בחסד שהש"י משפיע לו חסדו שכל מה ...


5

It has been said that a Jew may visit the graves of righteous gentiles to arouse one to do Teshuvah when the graves of Jews are not available in one’s vicinity, but if the cemetery you wish to enter contains statues of idols (such as Christian crosses, etc.) then you should not enter such a cemetery let alone pray or learn there. M”B 579:14; Kaf Hachaim ...


5

This question is in fact dealt with by Rashi on the spot, who says that the first ה is redundant, and this has the same meaning as מלך המשפט, citing scriptural precedents for this phrasing. Basically - this is an unusual, anomalous usage which חז"ל chose for some reason, but the normative way of saying this would be מלך המשפט - king of justice. Thanks to @...


4

Nit'ei Gavriel, Hilchot Bein HaMetzarim 62 fn 7 quotes an explanation from Responsa Zera Emet as to the common custom to omit shir shel yom and ein kelokeinu from shacharit and instead to recite them at mincha. Essentially, one would be permitted to recite them at shacharit, despite the prohibition of learning Torah on Tisha B'Av, as they fall under the ...


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