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37

In this interview with Terry Gross (around 5:08), those lyrics' author, Sheldon Harnick, says that he basically made up syllables that he thought would "give the effect" of "Chassidic chanting," despite not being familiar with such chanting from his own background. The first person to play Tevye, Zero Mostel, then replaced the syllables Harnick had written ...


36

Yes, there is a history of Jewish communities in Arab countries relying on the Muslim call to prayer for their own praying times. For one such example, here is the Ben Ish Hai, (Hacham Yosef Haim) who lived from 1832-1909 in Baghdad, and who refers to the maghrab (an Islamic prayer-time called after sunset) in various places: Ben Ish Hai, Year 1, Vayakhel ...


33

Obligatory Summary The Jewish day starts at night, but V'sein Tal Umatar is based on solar calendar, so it can sometimes be a day later. Plus the date was established in Julian Calendar, so there's also the Julian->Gregorian shift to keep us busy... Real Answer The Gemara (Taanis 10a) says that in Bavel we start saying V'sein Tal Umatar on the 60th day ...


25

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. (Some places use electric "candles"; others use wax. I prefer the wax, though it is a bit more dangerous, smelly, and messy.) It has nothing to do with ...


21

The "Modim anachnu lach" in davening is a quotation from Divrei Hayamim I 29:13. "L'cha" becomes "lach" because of the etnachta, which is a pause in the pasuk.


19

The Shulchan Aruch rules (OC 124:3) קהל שהתפללו וכולם בקיאים בתפלה, אעפ"כ ירד ש"צ וחוזר להתפלל, כדי לקיים תקנת חכמים A congregation which prayed and all of them were adept at praying, even so the leader goes back and repeats the prayer [aloud] in order to fulfill the enactment of the sages. So the Halacha is clear; the question is why? ShmuelBrin ...


19

As Dov F has noted, the argument over praying in a mosque is now split between R. Ovadia Yosef and the Tzitz Eliezer. Please see the update below regarding the original Rambam responsa that is referred to by R. Ovadia. The Tzitz Eliezer writes against praying in a mosque in his responsa Volume 14, #91: ולמדנו מכאן שהקדשים של כותים וגם המשוגע של ...


19

I'm not widely traveled, but I've been to a bunch of different synagogues of all the major flavors, often as one-offs, including C and MO, so I'm answering on the basis of that experience. First visit You can just show up. Many of the factors that affect you are the same between Conservative and Modern Orthodox synagogues. The Conservative synagogue you'...


19

The Gemara in Berachos 10a says that (at the advice of his wife Beruriah) Rebbi Meir prayed for neighbors of his to become religious, and the Gemara seems to approve of this. This is also implied by Sotah 14a, where Moshe is said to daven for the wicked to return, as well as in Taanis 23b, where Abba Chilkiyah says that his wife is more righteous because she ...


19

In Lma'an Yishme'u #267 (page 2) Rabbi Chaim Hillel Raskin says that it is a Halachic obligation to quiet or turn off a cell phone before starting to Daven. If he did not, and his cell phone rings, he is allowed to quiet or turn off the phone to ensure that no one will be disturbed further. Although he doesn't specifically address a situation where it hasn'...


18

OC 101 (2) and MB s.k.5 and especially 6. MB: One reason not to raise the voice is not to disturb others. Other reasons are to be like the prayer of Channa; to avoid being one of those of little faith who do not believe that HaShem hears prayers uttered quietly and to avoid being like the false prophets who cry out loud to false gods. But the important ...


18

The oldest reference to this tradition that I am aware of is the Taz ("Turei Zahav"), by David haLevi Segal, 17th c. הלוחש על המכה או על החולה ורוקק ואחר כך קורא פסוק מן התורה אין לו חלק לעוה"ב One who whispers over a wound or over a sick person and who spits, and who then recites a verse from the Torah has no portion in the world to come. ...


18

Moreshet.co.il reports: אך האריז"ל הנהיג להוסיף שלשה פסוקים ראשונים ממזמור צ"ה, "לכו נרננה" וכו', כדי לא לסיים בפורענות - "יצמיתם ה' אלקינו", כעין מה שאמרו חז"ל לגבי הפסקה בקריאת התורה: "ואין מפסיקין בקללות", וכן נוהגים בסיום הקריאה של מגילת איכה, שאחרי הפסוק האחרון "כי אם מאס מאתנו" וכו', חוזרים על הפסוק שלפניו: "השיבנו ה' אליך" וכוו, כדי לא ...


16

סידור אוצר התפילות writes: וכן כתב של"ה שירת הים צריך לאמרה מעומד ובשמחה רבה כאלו אותה שעה יצא ממצרים, ובכוונה ובנגון הטעמים And so writes the Shaloh, Shiras Hayam must be said standing, and with great joy as if at that moment he one was leaving mitzrayim, with kavana, and with the tune of the ta'amim. סידור שפה ברורה (a German siddur) says: שירת ...


15

You can come early and get a head start, this way you are holding with the Tzibbur when Shemona Esrei starts. Another option would be to slowly educate them to the beauty of Tefila, and thereby get the speed decreased.


15

Yes. The Jerusalem Talmud (Tractate Megillah) quotes Rav Imi telling his assistant that if a scholar should visit and need to sleep in the Synagogue, he should let him, and allow him to bring his donkey and other objects in as well. This opinion is codified in the Ran in Tractate Megillah. Rav Moshe Feinstein in his Responsa writes, ...


15

Mishna Berura on SA OC 104 sk 2: ‏ (ב) בתפלתו ואפילו במקום הפסד ממון אין לו להפסיק. כתב הח"א כלל כ"ה סעיף ט' העומד בתפלה ונסתפק באיזה דין איך יתפלל כגון ששכח איזה דבר בתפלה מותר לילך ממקומו למקום מיוחד ולעיין שם בספר ואם מותר לשאול הדין צ"ע ונ"ל ‏דמותר (עד כאן לשונו של החיי אדם):‏ The Chaye Adam wrote (klal 25, paragraph 9): One who ...


15

Christianity and Islam say they worship the same god that we do, but that does not make it so. Christianity is the bigger problem. They say that a human being was part of God, which is shituf (think of it as heresy). That means it is forbidden for a Jew to participate in their prayers. On top of that, the trinity concept adds confusion. I am aware that ...


15

The Mishnah Berurah there (s.k. 28) explicitly addresses your question. ואפילו לאותן המניחין תפילין בחוה"מ בלי ברכה או המניחין תפלין דר"ת אחר שחלץ תפלין דרש"י או שחלץ תפלין ע"מ להחזירן דהרמ"א בסי"ב פסק דא"צ לחזור ולברך כשמניחן אח"כ אפ"ה עבירה היא להסיח ביניהן דלכתחילה בעינן שיהיו סמוכין ותכופין זה לזה דכתיב והיה לך לאות על ידך ולזכרון בין עיניך שיהא הוייה ...


14

If I daven for parnassah, probably not. However, for someone righteous enough, maybe, but it can come with a catch. Ta'anis 25a relates this story אמרה ליה דביתהו עד אימת ניזיל ונצטער כולי האי אמר לה מאי נעביד בעי רחמי דניתבו לך מידי בעא רחמי יצתה כמין פיסת יד ויהבו ליה חד כרעא דפתורא דדהבא (חזאי) בחלמא עתידי צדיקי דאכלי אפתורא דדהבא דאית ליה תלת כרעי (...


14

Chanoch and Ariel K are correct in their answer, but one can answer at greater length and detail. The letters beged kefet, בגד כפת are distinguished from other Hebrew letters in taking a dagesh kal, a 'weak' dagesh, at the start of words or after a shva nach. The function of this dagesh kal is to distinguish between the plosive and fricative versions of the ...


14

I'm not sure this completly answers your question but it is mentioned in Talmud, Soferim 20:6. http://www.virtualjerusalem.com/holidays/chanukah/maozhan.htm


14

The original siddur did not include a version for women. Changes to the format for women began later on. R. Jacob Emden (in his siddur commentary) suggested emending the morning blessings for women, but didn't recommend it. Chid"a (Avodat haKodesh 2 5 22) allowed the changes, along with Eshel Avraham (the Buchacher, OC 46 4) and Rivvos Efraim (1 37 2) ...


14

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


14

Assuming the question means why do we shockel/shuckle in davening, I found the following article by Rabbi Yaakov Salomon who quotes Rabbi Shimon Schwab ztz"l. He says that our relationship with HaShem in davenning is motivated by love (swaying forward) and fear (moving away). There are those who are against shockeling in davening, see for example here under "...


14

The Rema 139:11 says To say Chazak from the passuk in Yehoshua that says Chazak vametz .The passuk before it says that Torah should not leave your mouth and it will be a blessing for you. So there are those who say Chazak u'baruch and others answer Chazak vametz. The Kaf Hachaim 139:56 brings down the minhag to say Chazak U'baruch from this Rema.


14

Saadia Gaon didn't innovate it. It is based on Berachot 60a: ת"ר הנכנס לבית המרחץ אומר יהי רצון מלפניך יי' אלהי שתצילני מזה ומכיוצא בו ואל יארע בי דבר קלקלה ועון ואם יארע בי דבר קלקלה ועון תהא מיתתי כפרה לכל עונותי אמר אביי לא לימא אינש הכי דלא לפתח פומיה לשטן Our Rabbis taught: On entering a bath-house one should say: 'May it be Thy will O Lord, my ...


14

The Gra writes (Shenot Eliyahu to Brachot 1:1) that you have to read Shema yourself and you cannot fulfill your obligation by listening to another. (This is not universally agreed to, but see the next point.) As for the blessings, the whole point of having a Chazzan starting from (just before) Barchu is for him to recite the blessings of Keriat Shema out ...


14

The beginning of each stanza spells the name of the author שלמה הלוי. I surmise that the author wanted to spell his name and therefore reversed the order.


13

This is a piyut (liturgical poem) that was composed a few hundred years ago in Tzfat. The chorus does not contain the name of God, nor is this a davar shbikedusha (a prayer that can only be recited in the presence of a minyan - 10 men). There is no problem with repeating the chorus.


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