11

Rav Ovadia Yosef has a teshuva (Yabia Omer OC 7:54) on the former question (making up for a missed N'ila) dated 11 Tishrei 5748. He quotes Tosfot (Brachot 26a sv Iba'y) who gives two reasons that there is no tashlumin for a missed Musaf: because you can't say the verses related to the korbanot on the wrong day, and because Musaf was only established to take ...


6

The basic rule by tashlumin is that for all make-up prayers, the first prayer is the current one and the make-up is said afterwards. If this order is switched, the first prayer is invalid (S.A. O.C. 108:1-2). 108:2 טעה ולא התפלל מנחה מתפלל ערבית שתים הראשונה ערבית והשניה לתשלומין. 108:1 ואם היפך לא יצא ידי תפלה שהיא תשלומין וצריך לחזור ולהתפלל אותה ...


4

Incorporating some ideas that were mentioned in @IsaacMoses's and @DoubleAA's good answers, this question was asked of R' Ephraim Greenblatt and he printed the answer, YES, in a collection of short piskei halacha (legal decisions) called Riv'vos V'yovalos. Paragraph 73 there says that although the P'ri M'gadim in Mishb'tzos Zahav (108:5) doesn't give a ...


4

According to Shulchan Aruch (OC 89:1) one who did not daven shacharis until after the time for shacharis (four halachic hours) and davens after that time, until midday, still gets the reward for praying (although not for praying in its time). Rema adds that it is forbidden to daven shacharis after midday. Taz (ibid. 1) disagrees and says one may daven ...


3

Tashlumin always has to be after an ordinary obligatory prayer, so in your case in order to say the Tashlumin she would have to Daven Maariv first and then say the Tashlumin. (Halichot Shelomo Tefillah chapter 13 footnote יא‏) While the above is I believe the more commonly held position, I note that Rabbi Dr. Nahum Rabinovitch rules (Siach Nachum OC 10) ...


2

The sefer "Shegiyos Mi Yavin" (a compilation of the laws of mistakes in davening and brochos) writes (Chapter 14 Seif 4) - my own translation: If one made a mistake in Shomei Esrei that requires repeating (for example omitting "Vesen Tal U'matar" or Ya'ale Veyavo) and did not know that he was required to repeat it until after the time of davening ...


2

Essentially, yes you should still pray Tashlumin if you would have had to go back and pray at the time. However, this is only true if you would make up for your mistake. However, if you forget Yaaleh veYavo at Mincha on the last day of Rosh Chodesh then saying two Maarivs wouldn't solve anything because you don't make up the missed Yaaleh veYavo. You can ...


2

If someone woke up very late and missed davening Shacharit he may not eat until he davens mincha. [Mayan Omer v. 1 p. 157] (Source) I would imagine that the same applies in a case where there was a different reason as to why one missed Shacharit.


2

Rabbi Rachamum Mazuz quoting Yalkut Yosef 1:78 in a case where one missed Shacharus and Musaf on Rosh Chodesh says that first he should put on Tefilin and remove them, then Daven Mincha, then Daven Musaf, and then do Tashlumim for Shacharis. קודם כל יניח תפלין בברכה ויוריד אותו, ואח"כ יתפלל מנחה, ואחריה תפלת מוסף, ואח"כ תשלומין של שחרית The way I ...


2

I think you misunderstand the Gemara on 9a. We’re not learning Sukkos from Pesach, but rather Pesach from Sukkos. The translation that follows is how I understood the Gemara. נאמר עצרת בשביעי של פסח ונאמר עצרת בשמיני של חג מה להלן לתשלומין אף כאן לתשלומין It says “Atzeres” by the seventh day of Pesach, and it says “Atzeres” by the eighth day of ...


1

The basic scheme seems to be that Teffilos are רחמי and לואי שיתפלל כלל היום כולו, if only people would spend their entire day praying. Therefore a missed Teffila is not considered having passed it's time constraints. This is in stark contrast to a Teffila which was set up specially in place of a Korban such as Musaf. Once the proper time for that Tefilla ...


1

Mishna Berura 263:10:43 regarding a lady who lit Shabbos candles, says can not Daven Mincha any more. If there is no time then it is better for her to Daven twice Maariv. This clearly indicates that there is Tashlumin for a woman.


1

There's a bit of vagueness in your question. I assume that the worker gets a lunch break. I also assume that the break is either flexible, or if it must be taken at a fixed time, it's probably at the time of the earliest permissible time for mincha, even for b'di'eved. If so, that solves the time problem. As for "inappropriate place", if you can specify what ...


1

I've done the following (though now I cannot recall who advised me to do so): Daven the regular Tefillah (silent Shemoneh 'Esreh) with the Minyan, and then do Tashlumin during the repetition.(Point 1) This follows from the idea that there are two requirements of Tefillah/Tzibbur - one is Tefillah BETZIBUR (praying WITH the congregation), which is fulfilled ...


1

On the one hand, davening with a Minyan is always a good thing. It is a fairly recent innovation that you can get a Minyan at all hours. In earlier times (and in some places even today) you can't really do that (even if there are enough people living there to support it). On the other hand, Tashlumin has to be specifically connected to a time of obligatory ...


1

This article by Rabbis Aviad Bartov and Noam Malchi suggests three possible conceptual understandings of tefillat tashlumin. As an opportunity to ‘fix’ the omission of the previous prayer. As a fine for having missed the previous prayer. As the actual prayer that was missed, being prayed at a non-ideal time.


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