26

Thank you for your sensitivity in asking this question. As pointed out in comments, you are actually Jewish (whether you follow Judaism or not). But as you say in your question, you've been raised with Christianity and it doesn't appear that you've rejected that. You see Judaism as part of your cultural background, if I'm reading you correctly, the way ...


20

Likely, it is an acronym for קְהִילָה קְדוֹשָה k'hila k'dosha (lit: holy congregation), a title for Jewish communities whose use dates back to the Talmud (Tamid 27b).


17

Per Rabbi David Sperling it is not problematic to own or use a Swiss gear bag. The use of the cross - which is of course a Christian symbol - is widely discussed in halacha. When the cross is one that people bow to, or use in their worship, then there are serious halachic problems with owning such an item. However, when the cross is clearly not for ...


14

There is a Jewish practice to tear one's clothes when in mourning. In recent times, it has become common for non-Orthodox Jews to tear a black ribbon pinned to their clothes rather than the clothes themselves in order to avoid damaging an article of clothing. I am not sure whether using the ribbon satisfactorily fulfills the obligation according to the ...


12

Kashrut.com lists that symbol as belonging to Rabbi Mordechai Kaplinsky, in Brooklyn, NY. See there for contact information.


12

The Atlanta Kashrus Agency does not recommend the KORC. The AKC does not recommend the KORC certification. Lettuce products with this certification have been found to have have insects and require additional washing and checking.


11

The only thing that would be offensive is if you posed as accepting the Jewish faith and then went around telling everyone that they have to believe in Jesus.


11

That's the symbol of the Vaad Hoeir of St. Louis.


11

Most of the poskim deem the cross as something that Christians remember Jesus by, but not as an actual tool of worshipping. Therefore most agree that you are allowed to use it for pleasure, etc. Thus say: Terumat HaDeshen in Ra'avyah's name, the Rama, the Ritva, Rabbi Ovadia Yosef. This was taken from the following source (daily halacha based on Rabbi ...


10

Considering the opacity around the acceptability of different kashruth certification organizations in America, I don't think many people will be able to accurately answer this question. That being said, KORC appears on neither the cRc nor KosherQuest (Rabbi Eidlitz, based in California) lists of reliable hashgachot (although they of course have disclaimers ...


9

While this isn't exactly what you're looking for, it's close: the Rama's Toras Ha'Olah, which does go through just about every mitzvah/halakha in Seder Kodshim and explains the reasoning for their details in a super-cool-scientific-mystical way. It's not an encyclopedia in that it isn't in alphabetical order, but it is ordered systematically, by topic. ...


9

Rav Mirsky in his first volume of Hegyonei Halacha has an interesting article on Ameilah shel Torah and includes the virtues of a bear. In speaking about how important 'toil' in learning is (rather than rote learning) he brings a Radak on Hosea (13:8): .אֶפְגְּשֵׁם כְּדֹב שַׁכּוּל, וְאֶקְרַע סְגוֹר לִבָּם; וְאֹכְלֵם שָׁם כְּלָבִיא, חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה ...


8

Need to look up exact source of the tshuvah, but paraphrasing the Ben Ish Hai: crosses in churches (and those found inbas-relief on antique "expensive" vessels, bowls etc) are to be considered as idols and used in idol-worship. He says however crosses worn on necklaces nowadays (in his day) are not considered such and are merely decorative. He also ...


7

According to Alexander Beider's Handbook of Ashkenazic Given Names, Dov didn't become a name in "the vernacular life" until the 20th century. "Jews called Dov in Hebrew sources were actually named Ber in their everyday life." Ber, on the other hand, comes form the German Bero which has been known since the 8th century among non-Jews. Beider's theory is ...


7

Freemasonry is considered by some to be Luciferian (1). When witchcraft was legalized in the U.K., see here, Wicca copied the rituals of Freemasonry as their own magick rituals. It's based on Illuminism, the belief in self-deification with Lucifer as their archetypical example to imitate. Their monotheistic "one God" is mankind itself. Its origins are all ...


7

Deuteronomy 33:22: וּלְדָ֣ן אָמַ֔ר דָּ֖ן גּ֣וּר אַרְיֵ֑ה יְזַנֵּ֖ק מִן־הַבָּשָֽׁן׃ And of Dan he said: Dan is a lion’s whelp That leaps forth from Bashan. Rabbeinu Bachya writes in his commentary to that pasuk: דן גור אריה. ע"ד הפשט, המשילו בגבורה לגור אריה כאשר הוא מדלג מהר בשן . דן גור אריה, וע"ד הקבלה נקרא דן כנגד מדת הדין, כי כן אמרה ...


6

R. Hayyim Joseph David Azulai tangentially discusses this in his diary. In the entry for April 18, 1774 he writes: ומה אספר ורבו כמו רבו הענינים ופרטים בפרט וכלל רק את זה אומר שלילה א' אחר חצות כשהלכתי למטה והיה וילון פרוש ננדה כמשפטם ראיתי והנה אדם א' נכנס אצלי ונשתוממתי וא"ל אני משה בן הקאייד אומר לך אבי שיש בכאן קצת ליגורגיזים שהם מכת פראנק מאסון אם ...


6

I heard in a recording of R' Akiva Tatz that it is a nice incorporation of a verse in Mishlei (3:3): כתבם על לוח לבך Write them on the tablet of your heart The curved top luchos are an interpolation of a heart onto the luchos.


6

This info is on Kashrut.com : Orthodox Rabbinical Council of San Francisco 1851 Noriega Street, P.O. Box 22491, San Francisco, CA 94122 415-564-5665, Fax: 415-665-0394 Rabbi Jacob Traub, Chairman Email: orcsf@aol.com I could not find any info on any kashrut site regarding its reliability. As a matter of fact, various web forums debate its kashrut, with ...


6

Many numbers are used symbolically in Judaism - check out the our series of 338 (and growing) number-meaning questions. The only number we use in reference to Gcd is ONE! The most important Jewish declaration is the Shma: Hear O Israel... Gcd is ONE. Your missionaries' 3 examples of 3 are rather pathetic, to be candid: the waving over the Shabbat candles ...


6

Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan was among many things a painter. He mentioned this in his book Jewish Meditation. This [questionably sourced] article mentions: His dining room was adorned with a series of bizarre oil paintings. At some point, with no training as an artist, Kaplan decided to refrain from study for a year and devote himself to painting. After the year ...


5

According to Devarim 11:13-14 it is a reward from god: יג. וְהָיָה אִם שָׁמֹעַ תִּשְׁמְעוּ אֶל מִצְו‍ֹתַי אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוֶּה אֶתְכֶם הַיּוֹם לְאַהֲבָה אֶת יְהֹוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם וּלְעָבְדוֹ בְּכָל לְבַבְכֶם וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁכֶם: יד. וְנָתַתִּי מְטַר אַרְצְכֶם בְּעִתּוֹ יוֹרֶה וּמַלְקוֹשׁ וְאָסַפְתָּ דְגָנֶךָ וְתִירשְׁךָ וְיִצְהָרֶךָ: (Artscroll) translation: ...


5

Rav Avigdor Nevenzahl Shlit"a told me that he forbids buying Swiss products which feature the cross symbol lechatchila, however once it was bought he requires that the cross to be either covered, scratched out or removed completely.


5

I think it's the bayis, rather than the retzuah. Here are some reasons why: Rashi writes (Devarim 6:8): וקשרתם לאות על ידך: אלו תפילין שבזרוע And you shall tie them for a sign on your hand: these are the tefillin of the forearm It sounds like the part of the תפילין של יד that is the sign is the part that goes on the forearm; however, I'm not sure ...


5

The synagogue was designed by Ludwig Förster in the Moorish Revival style. So was, around the same time, the Leopoldstädter Tempel, which also has eight-cornered stars. The Yenidze factory, designed half a century later and by someone else but in the same style, also has eight-cornered stars. Eight-cornered stars seem to have been the style: nothing Jewish ...


5

They are two different (although similar-sounding) words. 1. מִלָּה meaning 'word' is attested to in Tehillim 139:4: כִּ֤י אֵ֣ין מִ֭לָּה בִּלְשׁוֹנִ֑י הֵ֥ן יְ֝הוָ֗ה יָדַ֥עְתָּ כֻלָּֽהּ׃‏ There is not a word on my tongue but that You, O LORD, know it well. Note the lack of a yod after the initial mem, and the dagesh in the lamed. This word is ...


4

BS"D, Hakham Eli Mansour makes this connection 'al pi HaRav Shimon Schwab in his shi'ur on Parashat Ki Tisa 5774 (link, see 17:15-28:00). HaRav Mansour explains HaRav Schwab by starting with the fact that it was the men who gave the gold from their earrings to Aharon after their wives refused to hand over their jewelry for the purposes of 'Avodah Zarah (for ...


4

According to the Jewish Encyclopedia: (a) It has been generally assumed that at times colors are used in the Bible symbolically, either in the ritual, as in the construction of the Tabernacle and in the priestly raiments; or apocalyptically, as in the visions of Zechariah and of Daniel; or, as a literary device, in poetical diction. Philo ("De Vita ...


4

The Seforno on Bereishis 9:17 understands the double rainbow as a wakeup call for Noach and his family “to [spiritually] wake up on seeing it, and to awaken the people of the generation to repent, to be wise, and to do good.” The Sages in several places caution against staring at the rainbow, based on a mystical understanding of the rainbow's ...


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