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6

There’s two main parts to Sukkos: the “Yom Tov,” on which most acts which are forbidden on the Sabbath are also forbidden (the main exception being many things that are involved in food preparation), and “Chol HaMoed,” on which some acts forbidden on Yom Tov are also forbidden, but which is generally more lenient. This year, the “Yom Tov” part of Sukkos ...


5

The לוח דבר בעיתו explains (regarding Rosh Chodesh Iyar 5769) that the reason we don't announce בה"ב on Rosh Chodesh is that: אין מברכים את המתענים בה"ב בחדש ניסן או בשבת ר"ח, השבת הקרובה, כמו שנאמר (קהלת ז, יד) "בְּיוֹם טוֹבָה - הֱיֵה בְטוֹב", ומברכים בשבת שלאחריה.‏ I.e. In a time of good fortune, enjoy the good fortune (Koheles 7:14) - so we don't ...


3

The Chasam Sofer in his Torah commentary and Responsa (O.C. 185) explains that the army left the camp in order to wage war and was thus no longer surrounded by the Clouds of Glory. The Sukkah commemorates entering the land of Israel, which commenced with these battles fought by soldiers who needed the shelter of physical booths. See the commentary for a ...


3

A possible answer is as follows: (Largely based on R. Yaakov Ettlinger in Bikkurei Yaakov 639:39 with a bit of my own twist.) It seems that the question is predicated on the fact that the Mishnah in Taanit refers to the rain as a siman klalah. If R. Yehoshua's objection is that rain is a siman klalah for the entirety of Sukkot, then indeed one can wonder ...


3

Rav Eliyashiv held that it is permissible since its k'ein taduru (like what people do in their own home). So it isn't a disgrace to the sukkah. From Vayishma Moshe chelek 5.


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Five conditions of a hiddur esrog according to the Tiferes Yisrael Sukkah 3:37 from most to least important. That it should be completely clean,and especially by the chotem (when the middle starts to bend in) there shouldn't even be pin drop of something unclean. The esrog should have many bumps and not be smooth skinned. The ukatz (bottom stem of esrog) ...


2

Based on Shulchan Arukh OC 568:1-2, if someone forgot and ate on a fast day with a fixed date, he doesn't have to fast a different day instead, and the communal Bahab in Iyar and Marcheshvan is considered a fast day with a fixed date (as opposed to accepting on yourself to arbitrarily fast a personal Bahab some other time, where if you missed a day you could ...


2

Rabbi Naftali Tzvi Yehuda Berlin in his work Ha'amek Davar (Leviticus 22,26) writes the following: This section is next to the holiday section and is read on the holidays. There is no doubt that there is an oral tradition dating back to Moses our Master that on the holidays the Torah reading begins with "When a bullock, or a sheep...". He then goes ...


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While I can understand the emotional issue one may have with paying dirt-cheap prices for a mitzva, I do not see the connection between ואנווהו which literally means to glorify, which is done through the beautification of the mitzva-object as stated in the Talmud (Shabbat 133b), and the price spent on the mitzva. Do you have a source that the ואנווהו ...


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I can't see how this make sense. According to this logic, it's preferable to pay the seller more then he asks... A person that owns Etrog (citron) tree, that gives the best looking Etrog in town, can't accomplish ואנווהו because he gets it for free?


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I think that many of your assumptions are incorrect. It's hard for me to offer the most appropriate reaction without knowing where you live and what you have experienced. But, I have lived in about 5 different communities and I have spent Succot in Israel. I can tell you from personal observance that Succot has far from lost its status and a big deal is made ...


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There are 2 types of "Meals" that should be eaten in a Succah (see below what doesn't need to be eaten in a Succah): 1. A meal which requires the Brocha of Leishev BaSuccah to be eaten in the Succah, This includes: Bread (made of the 5 grains) with the volume slightly larger than an egg (Shulchan Aruch OC 639,2 explained by Magen Avraham) even if eaten as ...


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The Shulchan Aruch OC 639:2 answers your question We eat and drink and sleep in the Sukkah all seven days, both day and night, and we do not sleep outside of the Sukkah, even a very short sleep. But one may eat an insubstantial meal outside of the Sukkah. And how much is an insubstantial meal? Approximately an egg's worth of a loaf of bread. And ...


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