26

Thank you for your sensitivity in asking this question. As pointed out in comments, you are actually Jewish (whether you follow Judaism or not). But as you say in your question, you've been raised with Christianity and it doesn't appear that you've rejected that. You see Judaism as part of your cultural background, if I'm reading you correctly, the way ...


11

The only thing that would be offensive is if you posed as accepting the Jewish faith and then went around telling everyone that they have to believe in Jesus.


7

A star of David necklace is not a ritual object (just pretty jewelry), and I've never seen anybody take offense at one being given by a non-Jew. This is, in fact, one of the safest Jewish items you can buy; were you to try to select books or ritual objects, you would quickly run into matters of differences in tradition and would risk getting the "wrong" ...


5

The synagogue was designed by Ludwig Förster in the Moorish Revival style. So was, around the same time, the Leopoldstädter Tempel, which also has eight-cornered stars. The Yenidze factory, designed half a century later and by someone else but in the same style, also has eight-cornered stars. Eight-cornered stars seem to have been the style: nothing Jewish ...


3

Wearing the Star of David, if you are not Jewish, is not considered rude or disrespectful. Although it is certainly confusing to others because it identifies you as a Jew, the same way that wearing a skullcap identifies a man as a Jew, there are many Christians who do wear the Star of David to show their love of Judaism.


3

The eight pointed star, Rub el Hizb is a symbol of Islam and was used as part of the Moorish Revival architecture. This style of architecture was included in many synagogues in Europe and the United States. The architect appears not to have been aware of the religious significance of the eight pointed star and just used it as part of the style they were ...


2

I would find it offensive. First of all, because tattoos are forbidden in Judaism and so putting a Star of David on a tattoo seems ironic at best. Additionally, I dislike having crosses and Stars of David together - sure Christians and Jews have their similarities but we have some big differences that cannot be reconciled, no matter how much missionaries and ...


1

No one should be offended by you choosing to wear a necklace. It's hard to say who will be offended by what as t here is always some fool that's looking to be offended by something. That being said the star of David is not a religious symbol but a relatively new cultural symbol.


1

Rav Ari Enkin describes From the days of the Arizal, people had the custom of making and wearing amulets with a Magen David. It was recommended that pregnant women wear a Magen David as a segula for an easy childbirth. There are also those who contend that the Magen David was actually the seal of King Solomon which he used in order to control ...


1

I wrote some of this in comments to someone's answer, but it should probably be an answer in itself. In a way, I would say that you need to believe and live out what you think God wants from you, in front of Him alone, rather than worrying about what offends other people. This is a very important thing in all of our lives. But for a few reasons I'm not ...


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